Jump to content
Kirk Lorange

New lesson: Happy Birthday

Recommended Posts

Hi Kirk

Love the lessons and the whole site.

I have a question though & forgive me for my ignorance: helpsmili .

Both me & my partner are learning to play and at times we kinda interupt each other when practising, so i thought it'd be a good idea on some of your lessons that one plays the lesson & the other the chords. That we we could practice both chords & fingerpicking together. Anyway i've kinda gone off the subject :oops: The question is in your hapy birthday lesson which version of the chord F are you using? You say it's neutral what does that mean? I've tried looking it up, but i can only find 3 versions and they are all barre chords HELP!!!! :blush::rockon:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same as the six string bar chord minus Root note .

E----1(F)-----

B----1©-----

G----2(A)-----

D----3(F)-----

A----3©-----Optional

E----1(F)-----optional

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The question is in your hapy birthday lesson which version of the chord F are you using? You say it's neutral what does that mean? I've tried looking it up, but i can only find 3 versions and they are all barre chords HELP!!!! :blush::rockon:

I'm not using a chord, 67mark, I'm just playing notes from the chord. If I were to flesh it out into a proper chord, it would be the F barre on the first fret.

When I say it's neutral, I mean that IV chords are 'neutral' (not a musical term) in that they don't herald any subsequent chord change. In the key of C, F is the IV, so I wasn't referring to F really ... I was referring to the function of a IV chord within a key. V chords demand that you return to the I ... IV chords don't care where you go next.

This is all stuff that you needn't worry about if you're just starting out or just wanting to twang away ... it's just for those who are curious about the context of it all. Music is the epitome of context, so it's interesting to some ... I think! :unsure: ... interesting to me, anyway.

Next week's lesson will shed of bit of light onto this whole subject of chord functions within a key.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if i want to duet with my mrs, i better start getting down the barre chord F on the first fret then Kirk? :salute: Sorry if my ramblings confused you, but you do mention in the lesson that these chords are the ones that you would be playing if you were accompanying on rhythum guitar. :clap::guitardude::laughingg:

Keep those lessons coming :clap:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So if i want to duet with my mrs, i better start getting down the barre chord F on the first fret then Kirk? :salute: Sorry if my ramblings confused you, but you do mention in the lesson that these chords are the ones that you would be playing if you were accompanying on rhythum guitar. :clap::guitardude::laughingg:

Keep those lessons coming :clap:

Any old F chord will do the job, 67mark, which ever you find easiest to play. Plain old chords are just three notes that are played together, and on a guitar they can found in many locations and configurations. When you play a big six-string barre F chord, you're doubling up on one of those notes (the 5), tripling up on another (the 1, or root) and there's a 3 in there as well. As long as you get one of each -- 1-3-5 -- you're playing a major chord.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×