Jump to content
Slidewinder

Scale on scales

Recommended Posts

On a scale of 1 - 10 how important is it to you personally to learn/master the minor pentatonic scale? Seems as though whenever I run into the subject online emphasis enough cannot be placed on learning this "alphabet." So the real question is: Am I just spinning my wheels, wasting precious time, memorizing the five patterns and practicing speed build-up? Should I move on, or continue to pluck away at this boring stuff?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Learning scales could be of great help.  I don't know because I never learned any.  Over a long period of time I just learned notes that I like.  They are most probably based on at least one scale, and perhaps more than one.  I  just tried to learn songs.  The song forced me to learn new things.  Over time I learned a lot of new things.

 

Even if you work on scales, you can still work on learning songs.

 

On your scale you only have two choices so I'll go with 1.

 

There are 10 kinds of people in the world.  Those that understand binary and those who don't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slidewinder,

 

A lot of Blues is based on the minor and major pentatonic scales. It probably is not a total waste of time. If you think it is boring, it sounds like you are just running up and down scales. Try putting what you're learning into something productive. As Rockerbob said learn tunes. 

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try to play scales with some backing tracks. It will help you more exciting on practice and play music. 

When you play with a backing track you will notice how the scales react with chords.

And practice everyday with scales, be patience and your hand will move on scales naturally one day

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"On a scale of 1 - 10 how important is it to you personally to learn/master the minor pentatonic scale? Seems as though whenever I run into the subject online emphasis enough cannot be placed on learning this "alphabet." So the real question is: Am I just spinning my wheels, wasting precious time, memorizing the five patterns and practicing speed build-up? Should I move on, or continue to pluck away at this boring stuff?"

 

 

I don't know, what other boring stuff would you be learning?  Learning how a scale - or specifically the Major scale - has been constructed and how the scale should sound are the backbone of practical music theory.  I really can't think of a reason why you shouldn't have at least the basics of music theory in your head if you want to play music.  You can play well without knowing a lot of theory, but if you try to create music, it just comes easier when you have at least the basics of how everyone else has done it in your head.

 

If you are only learning the pentatonic patterns and ignoring all other scales - particularly the Major scale, yeah, you're wasting your time.  If you are only learning patterns and not learning the sound of the scale - the sound of landing on the root and the distance between the root and, say, the third and why hearing that in your head is important - and experimenting with turning scales into music, yeah, you're wasting your time.  

 

How many patterns should you know?  How many do you think you might use?  Depending on the genre of music you choose to play, you may not use any.  That doesn't mean you shouldn't know the sound of the scale and how to apply it to music.  Because the pentatonic is heavily used in many genres, there are more ways of teaching and learning the pentatonic than any other issue of practical guitar theory.  You may be wasting your time just learning boxes if you can get away with using just the "frying pan" pattern or the "toothbrush" pattern.

 

It sounds as though you are self teaching yourself the pentatonics.  One of the most common problems of self teaching is the teacher doesn't know what the student needs to learn next.  So both the teacher and the student waste a lot of time.  

 

Speed build up?  Again, how fast do you need to play?  

 

Basically, if you can't take theory and skills and turn them into some form of music, yeah, you're wasting your time.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite important...as already said by others. Good thing is, if you learn minor pentatonic, you already learn relative major (just need to pay attention to root notes)

Step to major/minor scale form this is quite small one....and you cover a lot of rock music by this. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×