Jump to content
6string

E Phrygian or Other?

Recommended Posts

I've been doing some slow noodling with E,F & G lately in a spanish sounding way.

The notes that seem to work are the C major scale. I've looked that up and it's called E phrygian except the chords don't match.
Is it e phrygian or some other name?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6string,

Phrygian is the third mode in the diatonic key. In the key of C major, playing the diatonic scale from E to E will give you the Phrygian sound. It's often said the Phrygian sound has a Spanish flavor to the scale. Play this mode over an Em7 and you will hear the Phrygia sound.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6string,

Yes, all seven modes can be played in the key of C major. With the Phrygian mode you are technically playing an Em scale (E to E) in the key of C major.

Ionian - Cmaj (I Chord C-E-G - Scale C to C)

Dorian - Dm (ii chord D-F-A - Scale D to D)

Phrygian - Em (iii Chord E-G-B - Scale E to E)

Lydian - Fmaj (IV Chord F-A-C - Scale F to F)

Mixolydian - G7 (V7 Chord G-B-D-F - Scale G to G)

Aeolian - Am (vi Chord A-C-E - Scale A to A)

Locrian - B dim (vii Chord B-D-F - Scale B to B)

All the modes in the key of C major have one thing in common. They all have notes from the C major scale.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many say E is served best straight from the Phyrigian.

Especially when its the main ingredent of a beverage :callbeer:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the first chord E major or E minor? If it's E major (which I'm inclined to believe it is given the fact that you mentioned "spanish"), it's actually the phrygian dominant scale. It's a very spanish sounding scale. It's a mode of the harmonic minor scale. It's also used heavily in metal.

It's important to not mistake the mode with its parent scale, because that's where the tonic is being defined in your solo. All the notes might be the same but how they interact with one another is different. For example, E phrygian dominant is a mode from the parent A harmonic minor. However, if you playing A harmonic minor, the G# has a strong pull toward the A, being the leading tone. If you are playing E phrygian, the G# is very stable where it is, as it's considered a guide tone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×