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Cleaning your fretboard/fingerboard

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I've got a maple board. Can I still use lemon oil?

Denatured alcohol? Acetone, you mean? Please use layman's language. I'm a commerce student. Lack knowledge in sciency stuff :P

No lemon oil is for raw fretboards such as rosewood, ebony pau ferro (like that wood), maple is always finished and does not require oiling. Use the same cleaner as you do for the guitar body.

Acetone is NOT alcohol - it is used to STRIP nail polish dont use it on a guitar.

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The easiest safest cleaner is lighter fluid! I clean fretboards all day long with it, and a coarse paper towel. But the real secret is Fret Doctor fret board oil. Designed for expensive clarinets, it contains a dozen exotic plant oils and nourishes the wood. I can basically recondition a fretboard in 5 to 10 minutes with these two.

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On 3/30/2006 at 9:40 AM, bluesguy said:

:lol: But what if you are playing blues at a BBQ joint? You gotta eat some ribs!?! :lol:

Possibly consider washing your hands in the Ladie's Room. Or club soda is pretty good.

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Are there lemon oils I should avoid, coz I'm fixin to buy some now, since somebody told me my chopping block Mineral Oil wasn't safe enough. It's past string-n-clean time. Plus it will be NGD in a couple weeks !!

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12 hours ago, texred said:

Are there lemon oils I should avoid, coz I'm fixin to buy some now, since somebody told me my chopping block Mineral Oil wasn't safe enough. It's past string-n-clean time. Plus it will be NGD in a couple weeks !!

 

Lemon oil or boiled linseed oil are both fine.  Look to see if there are other ingredients.  If there are, look further.  Neither oil is for cleaning the fingerboard.  They are to keep it from drying out.  Oiling the fingerboard might be OK once a year, but you don't want oil gunking up the surface.  Your fingerboard is most likely not thirsty.  Oil finishes can last for decades, For cleaning, the same as the rest of the guitar.  Soft, damp cloth.  Fingerboards build up gunk faster than the rest of the guitar.  For deep cleaning I use 0000 steel wool.  Followed by a damp cloth to remove the dust and residue.

 

On a finished fingerboard, like Fender's maple fingerboards, treat it like the rest of the guitar.  It has the same finish so the same care is appropriate.

 

Anyway, this is my opinion.  I believe  many people use too many "products" on their guitars.  Your mileage may vary.

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Thank you, as always. What concerns me is these guitars have been in the desert for a year, 5% humidity, and many days when the temperature varies 60 degrees in one day, altho I keep them in my bedroom, which is of course, the most elementally safe place. But still. And now I've got fret sprouts. After a year.

 

And what about crap like Fender guitar cleaner and preserver or whatever the hell it says? BS? Thought so. I'll stick with water, thank you. possibly a toothbrush?

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Many guitars have necks that shrink in a dry climate.  Its an extremely easy problem to fix.  You just need a straight metal file.  File the edges only until you don't feel them.  You can file at a slight angel towards the fingerboard.  I live in Denver.  Our humidity indoors runs 10 to 15%.  I have a large humidifier in my guitar room in the basement.  I keep the relative humidity between 40% and 50%.  The basement doesn't change temperature as fast as other areas, and slow temp changes usually don't cause lots of trouble.  But I was the repair guy at a guitar shop for about 4 years and filed the frets ends on many guitars.  I still have the tools, but I haven't had to change anything on any of my current guitars for decade.

 

Guitar polish is completely unnecessary at best and harmful at worst.  Soft cloth damp with water.  If, after playing for a while, the place where your arm rests gets dull and won't shine.  When that happens I use Novus plastic polish #4.

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23 minutes ago, Rockerbob said:

Many guitars have necks that shrink in a dry climate.  Its an extremely easy problem to fix.  You just need a straight metal file.  File the edges only until you don't feel them.  You can file at a slight angel towards the fingerboard.  I live in Denver.  Our humidity indoors runs 10 to 15%.  I have a large humidifier in my guitar room in the basement.  I keep the relative humidity between 40% and 50%.  The basement doesn't change temperature as fast as other areas, and slow temp changes usually don't cause lots of trouble.  But I was the repair guy at a guitar shop for about 4 years and filed the frets ends on many guitars.  I still have the tools, but I haven't had to change anything on any of my current guitars for decade.

 

Guitar polish is completely unnecessary at best and harmful at worst.  Soft cloth damp with water.  If, after playing for a while, the place where your arm rests gets dull and won't shine.  When that happens I use Novus plastic polish #4.

OK, I gotcha. But I still have to figure out a solution for this house. I could turn the studio into a guitar humidor, but dang, I'm in the desert for a reason!  I hate humidity!! I can't even breathe above 30%. I wonder if they made leetle ones that fit inside a HSC. . . we could get rich. . .I saw somebody had stacks and stacks of rectangular (plastic?) boxes of guitars that fit all nicely on top of each other. I could SMELL that was out of my budget.

I know we've been through this before, but you know new questions or attitudes or opinions or whatever are encountered. I know you understand.

Are you ready for another issue? I asked someone else coz I didn't want to keep bugging you. With untrained fingers, I want to explore finger picking, regular, bending, and slide. I have a 2006 Squier, SE, Epi LP Special I P90s, and if the creek don't rise, Agile AL2000. Yes, now I will stop buying (does everybody say that?) and start playing. But for the shape my shape is in, I'm am very fortunate to have a single coil, P90s, and humbuckers. I feel complete, for now. Anyway, the gentleman to which I am referring to says he has 11s (yes, string question) set to med high action so he can play slide whatever and whenever he is playing. Sounds reasonable, but we're talking and extremely seasoned vet as opposed to me. And I haven't even stopped to understand string gauges yet. I can only afford strings and lemon oil (Agile) this month, so I'll worry about setup next month. Maybe you'll have more faith in me then, or less !! I am pretty impatient when things don't go right, but I'm a bulldog.

Thanks, RocketMan :P

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32 minutes ago, texred said:

OK, I gotcha. But I still have to figure out a solution for this house. I could turn the studio into a guitar humidor, but dang, I'm in the desert for a reason!  I hate humidity!! I can't even breathe above 30%. I wonder if they made leetle ones that fit inside a HSC. . . we could get rich. . .I saw somebody had stacks and stacks of rectangular (plastic?) boxes of guitars that fit all nicely on top of each other. I could SMELL that was out of my budget.

I know we've been through this before, but you know new questions or attitudes or opinions or whatever are encountered. I know you understand.

Are you ready for another issue? I asked someone else coz I didn't want to keep bugging you. With untrained fingers, I want to explore finger picking, regular, bending, and slide. I have a 2006 Squier, SE, Epi LP Special I P90s, and if the creek don't rise, Agile AL2000. Yes, now I will stop buying (does everybody say that?) and start playing. But for the shape my shape is in, I'm am very fortunate to have a single coil, P90s, and humbuckers. I feel complete, for now. Anyway, the gentleman to which I am referring to says he has 11s (yes, string question) set to med high action so he can play slide whatever and whenever he is playing. Sounds reasonable, but we're talking and extremely seasoned vet as opposed to me. And I haven't even stopped to understand string gauges yet. I can only afford strings and lemon oil (Agile) this month, so I'll worry about setup next month. Maybe you'll have more faith in me then, or less !! I am pretty impatient when things don't go right, but I'm a bulldog.

Thanks, RocketMan :P

OK, Elvis has NOT left the room. I read this, and I got a headache. http://www.guitaranswerguy.com/12-lemon-oil-debate/

Apparently, you want purity, but not purity. My brain hurts.

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I've got food grade mineral oil with vitamin E for butcher blocks, which I'm about to use to mince some guitar into the chile so I will get the mojo and be able to play.

My first thought was: put some essential oil in the mineral oil, until I realized I have no idea what I'm doing. Second: I am going to cut an orange in half, and give the whole guitar a bath, from nut to assend. Whatever that's called. IF I didn't need a new chain, I'd go out a cut some wood. Just coz I never did it before doesn't mean I wouldn't. Hey, it's MY chainsaw.

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On 2/24/2018 at 4:29 PM, Rockerbob said:

Many guitars have necks that shrink in a dry climate.  Its an extremely easy problem to fix.  You just need a straight metal file.  File the edges only until you don't feel them.  You can file at a slight angel towards the fingerboard.  I live in Denver.  Our humidity indoors runs 10 to 15%.  I have a large humidifier in my guitar room in the basement.  I keep the relative humidity between 40% and 50%.  The basement doesn't change temperature as fast as other areas, and slow temp changes usually don't cause lots of trouble.  But I was the repair guy at a guitar shop for about 4 years and filed the frets ends on many guitars.  I still have the tools, but I haven't had to change anything on any of my current guitars for decade.

 

Guitar polish is completely unnecessary at best and harmful at worst.  Soft cloth damp with water.  If, after playing for a while, the place where your arm rests gets dull and won't shine.  When that happens I use Novus plastic polish #4.

 

On 2/24/2018 at 6:06 PM, texred said:

I've got food grade mineral oil with vitamin E for butcher blocks, which I'm about to use to mince some guitar into the chile so I will get the mojo and be able to play.

My first thought was: put some essential oil in the mineral oil, until I realized I have no idea what I'm doing. Second: I am going to cut an orange in half, and give the whole guitar a bath, from nut to assend. Whatever that's called. IF I didn't need a new chain, I'd go out a cut some wood. Just coz I never did it before doesn't mean I wouldn't. Hey, it's MY chainsaw.

 

On 2/24/2018 at 4:29 PM, Rockerbob said:

Many guitars have necks that shrink in a dry climate.  Its an extremely easy problem to fix.  You just need a straight metal file.  File the edges only until you don't feel them.  You can file at a slight angel towards the fingerboard.  I live in Denver.  Our humidity indoors runs 10 to 15%.  I have a large humidifier in my guitar room in the basement.  I keep the relative humidity between 40% and 50%.  The basement doesn't change temperature as fast as other areas, and slow temp changes usually don't cause lots of trouble.  But I was the repair guy at a guitar shop for about 4 years and filed the frets ends on many guitars.  I still have the tools, but I haven't had to change anything on any of my current guitars for decade.

 

Guitar polish is completely unnecessary at best and harmful at worst.  Soft cloth damp with water.  If, after playing for a while, the place where your arm rests gets dull and won't shine.  When that happens I use Novus plastic polish #4.

Hey RocketMan, how are you? My roof still don't leak (not that it actually rains), but I always put that at the top of the list for things to be grateful for. I might have been known to sometimes make a simple thing into a hard one . . . https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&ei=EnSUWoznC-SMjwSd4bLoAg&q=lemon+oil+for+guitars&oq=lemon+oil+for+guitars&gs_l=psy-ab.3...3136.10793.0.11565.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0..0.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..0.0.0....0.L0zFy-zZDM8

I would think a D'Addario product would be ok, but it doesn't look ok to me................

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On 2/24/2018 at 10:45 AM, Rockerbob said:

 

Lemon oil or boiled linseed oil are both fine.  Look to see if there are other ingredients.  If there are, look further.  Neither oil is for cleaning the fingerboard.  They are to keep it from drying out.  Oiling the fingerboard might be OK once a year, but you don't want oil gunking up the surface.  Your fingerboard is most likely not thirsty.  Oil finishes can last for decades, For cleaning, the same as the rest of the guitar.  Soft, damp cloth.  Fingerboards build up gunk faster than the rest of the guitar.  For deep cleaning I use 0000 steel wool.  Followed by a damp cloth to remove the dust and residue.

 

On a finished fingerboard, like Fender's maple fingerboards, treat it like the rest of the guitar.  It has the same finish so the same care is appropriate.

 

Anyway, this is my opinion.  I believe  many people use too many "products" on their guitars.  Your mileage may vary.

Tell you what. Just tell me what you use and I'll quit with this obsession of a product being too acidic. I really have apent awhile trying to learn, but you know google.

Just tell me what you use and you can close this threat. How about that??

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19 minutes ago, texred said:

Tell you what. Just tell me what you use and I'll quit with this obsession of a product being too acidic. I really have apent awhile trying to learn, but you know google.

Just tell me what you use and you can close this threat. How about that??

 

This is what I use.  Notice the bottle is still mostly full.  Not much is needed and not very often.

lemon oil - 1.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Rockerbob said:

I get lemon oil at the hardware store.  Its usually less expensive there.

 

In this not-quite-a-town, it'll be a miracle without additives. I looked up making my own, then all these sites started crap about acidity, and guitarist about additives blah blah blah

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3 minutes ago, Rockerbob said:

 

This is what I use.  Notice the bottle is still mostly full.  Not much is needed and not very often.imageproxy.php?img=&key=aa2028430e430fbc

lemon oil - 1.jpg

Thank you, and I gotcha. Water is my friend. Fixing to order strings, so that's why this was driving me nuts. More xanax please. Thank you, again.

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5 minutes ago, texred said:

Thank you, and I gotcha. Water is my friend. Fixing to order strings, so that's why this was driving me nuts. More xanax please. Thank you, again.

If I already have some, I'm not telling. Probably. And what's this "Fender hump". I had to go examine my strat. I am turning into a hypoguitarondriach.

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On 2/26/2018 at 4:22 PM, texred said:

Thank you, and I gotcha. Water is my friend. Fixing to order strings, so that's why this was driving me nuts. More xanax please. Thank you, again.

Anybody wanna buy 3 pints of lemon oil???

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On 2/26/2018 at 4:22 PM, texred said:

Thank you, and I gotcha. Water is my friend. Fixing to order strings, so that's why this was driving me nuts. More xanax please. Thank you, again.

Part of what I was gonna ask: decided on D's 10s, phosphor bronze. Now, what diff would it make to me if they were 10-46 or 10-53 or . . . ?

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29 minutes ago, texred said:

Anybody wanna buy 3 pints of lemon oil???

Three pints is a lifetime supply for over 100 guitars.

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23 minutes ago, texred said:

Part of what I was gonna ask: decided on D's 10s, phosphor bronze. Now, what diff would it make to me if they were 10-46 or 10-53 or . . . ?

.010 high E sets are to light.  At least go to an .011.  Better would be .012.  

 

What .010 high E sets are good for is electric guitars string bending.  Phosphor bronze is NOT for electric guitars, only acoustic.  Bronze, a copper alloy, is a nonferrous metal and doesn't work well at all with magnetic pickups on electric guitars.

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1 hour ago, Rockerbob said:

.010 high E sets are to light.  At least go to an .011.  Better would be .012.  

 

What .010 high E sets are good for is electric guitars string bending.  Phosphor bronze is NOT for electric guitars, only acoustic.  Bronze, a copper alloy, is a nonferrous metal and doesn't work well at all with magnetic pickups on electric guitars.

What a friggin idiot told me to get those. Wait'll I find that squinty eyed troll mf.

Thanks. What about the 46 v 53 or whatever?

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2 hours ago, Rockerbob said:

Three pints is a lifetime supply for over 100 guitars.

I guess I was supposed to use it on the other furniture. Or the floor. Hardwood in every single room, and it's true guitars and ceramics don't bounce well. As soon as somebody cleans the floors, I can put down all these rugs I'm finding.

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25 minutes ago, texred said:

...... all these rugs I'm finding.

 

Is one of them white with a slight perm & two holes near the front?

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