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  1. Today
  2. Hello, Just for your interest, I notice that you are displaying some tension in both hands - and in particular, to the right hand pinky. When a neophyte is watching your playing, they may also adapt to the actual positions of the hands. Other the other hand, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmqR93Us4SI
  3. rickyc

    Mini-lesson for beginners (chord comping)

    I want to come back to this
  4. Easy to say, hard to do for this old timer new player:-)
  5. rickyc

    Nylon strings

    Do the top 3 nylon strings on a nylon guitar age and need changing like the steel ones do? I'm thinking of buying Elixir coated for the metal ones because can't find coated ones in a nylon set. Is there a steel (Elixir) coated set the same size as the sera nylon bottom strings? I just inherited a nylon guitar and hate changing strings.
  6. Last week
  7. AmandsyPenner

    New Member - Introduction

    Hello, Dell! Welcome to the forum!
  8. AmandsyPenner

    Guitar for 11 year old?

    Was about to ask the same thing. Thanks for the tips!
  9. AmandsyPenner

    Hello, everyone!

    Thank you very much, everyone! Thank you all for the warm welcome! As a traveler and a photographer by heart, I'm a beginner when it comes to playing the guitar. Would definitely love to learn more from the experts in the forum.
  10. 6string

    Q&A: Musicality and Giftedness

    perhaps the "gift" is the drive & focus
  11. Rockerbob

    Q&A: Musicality and Giftedness

    I find it hard to reconcile labels. I defer my opinion on language and word usage to my son, an English major. I think the "gifted" are people who practice, or play 8 to 10 hours everyday. Then they become gifted. There is an old saying that I will paraphrase; "A good player has to practice 2 hours a day, but it only takes a virtuoso 8 to 12 hours a day." This is all just about semantics anyway. Words can be used to enlighten, cheat, confuse, steal, and many other uses. English has so many synonyms and homonyms it's surprising we can understand anything at all
  12. paul7926

    Q&A: Musicality and Giftedness

    Well I'll answer from my point of view: It really depends what you mean by those terms. I understand them to simply mean that a person has a natural talent by which they find it easier to process the information or perform the task. So to me a musical person would be someone who could listen to music and without much effort understand exactly what they are hearing and be able to repeat or extend it without necessarily understand the musical theory behind it. Gifted may mean the exact same thing in musical terms or it might relate to someone who, for example, has the natural motor skills and memory such that they never pick the wrong sting or miss finger a chord. So, for my definition anyway, I believe they are both applicable terms but it's just a way of short cutting towards something that other people would achieve with study and practice. To give you a non musical example. Going through school and college I always got good maths grades. I never had to work at them as for some reason I could understand what was being taught and apply it without needing to really 'study' at all. I wasn't the best in the class but I certainly did the least amount of work to achieve the grades I got. In contrast I'm sat here typing this and despite now being 50 years old I still can't spell worth a damn and have to rely on auto correct to help me out. Sure I could put in the time to learn but for me it takes a huge amount of effort to get where others just are naturally. I think that even if you look at the very top of any profession or pastime those people may have gained a leg-up by being gifted at whatever it is but they are so good because they took that gift and then applied the hundreds of hours of study and practice on top.
  13. Hello, Four questions: Q1: Are the terms "musical" and "gifted" valid or even applicable terms? R1: Q2: If not, why not? R2: Q3: If "musical" is a valid or applicable term, what does it mean to be "musical"? R3: Q4: If "gifted" is a valid or applicable term, what does it mean to be "gifted"? R4: I look forward to your responses?
  14. Earlier
  15. I tend to learn the guitar part so it can run on autopilot while I give attention to singing. You can also try to learn in short segments or phrases.
  16. ronnie

    string gauge

  17. HarryJS, Along with Ray Bergeron's suggestion, take a simple song and then use a "word-then-chord" approach beginning with larger-to-smaller intervals of time between the word and the chord. Begin with the first line of the song. I hope this makes sense? For example, word - 2 seconds - chord, word - 2 seconds - chord. Repeat this pattern a few times. Then try, word - 1 second - chord, word - 1 second - chords. Using a metronome to help you with the timing can be of help as you can begin with 60bpm then progress to 72bpm and so on.
  18. JanVigne

    string gauge

    If you just want a string retailer's name, don't take anyone's advice on strings. Try several out and decide for yourself. Strings are cheap and most everyone goes through the process of finding the strings they prefer. Keep a log of what you buy, when you install them and what you think of them when you take them off. That way, there's no confusion about what you've heard, what you like and what you don't and you can return to any set with ease. I use Ernie Ball Slinky's and Martin Retros but I can see a lot of people preferring different strings. Pearse makes great stuff but his products are difficult to find in a shop. I had used Pearse strings for years until I switched to the Retros. "tone in your hands , 🙄" The more you learn and the more you accomplish, the more that will make sense. Basically, don't get caught up in buying gear. A good player sounds like a good player because they understand how to play well, not how to buy gear.
  19. JanVigne

    Guitar for 11 year old?

    Talk to the instructor. They may have some ideas they wish to explore with the student and they might ask you to look at a more specific model of instrument. Otherwise, I would say begin with an acoustic guitar. Some people prefer to begin with an electric though I find the additional noise picked up by the electronics to be a distraction and, possibly, a reason for a new student to avoid playing if they always hear their fingers scraping on the strings. IMO good electric players use their picking hand to mute out these extraneous sounds. That makes for a lot of learning and a lot of hand coordination for an 11 year old to master. Try a shop that handles some smaller bodied guitar but not 3/4 or 1/2 sized guitars. Take a slow weekday afternoon to go in and explain to the shop what you want. Ask for the manager and ask who their best salesperson is for student level guitars. Don't shop on a busy weekend or holiday unless you want to feel rushed into buying something. A "parlor guitar" or a "travel guitar" should be well suited to an 11 year old's hands and their ability to hold an acoustic guitar. A parlor guitar was a standard size guitar for many years though as the demands of an orchestra grew, so too did the body of an acoustic guitar. Dreadnoughts are "full size" guitars and they are what you will see dominating the walls of most shops. Call ahead and ask about the shop's supply of smaller bodied guitars for an 11 year old. Eventually, electronics were added to the guitar and amplification made any guitar loud. Therefore, the actual size of the guitar a student plays is just a matter of what fits and not what can play the loudest. Technically, a "short scale length" has slightly less string tension than does a long scale length guitar. Shorter scale lengths go with smaller guitars in many cases. There's no need to pay several hundred dollars for a guitar but you do get what you pay for when you buy a guitar; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Dtct1Xdfgk There should be enough money invested to buy a guitar that is relatively easy to play. Don't buy a guitar that is going to need technical adjustments to make it playable. While there are several lines of guitars built overseas which IMO are standard issue recommendations for a student level instrument, there are also guitars built by American companies which are worth looking at. Yamaha owns the student level guitar market though they don't really build a parlor sized guitar. They prefer to call their small bodied guitars the 3/4 and 7/8 size. Several other lines to consider would be Fender, Gretsch and Alvarez, all of whom build actual parlor sized guitars. The Gretsch Jim Dandy parlor has a very short 24 " scale length and is probably the easiest to play guitar I've come across. It sells for $169 or so and can be found in numerous retailers' demo rooms. It has a bit of a funky sound compared to, say, a Yamaha but it's a sound I tend to like for many styles of music. Taylor sells several small bodied "travel guitars" what would be slightly higher priced but, if you consider many students grow to dislike their cheap first guitar, Taylor is a name brand guitar that has a certain Mojo to it. It is also a guitar that, should the student not continue with their studies, will return you some money on your purchase as a resale item. Or, possibly, the student who doesn't continue today will see their rather nice Taylor guitar sitting there and get back into the swing of things at a later date. There's a lot to be said for the value of a name brand guitar at this point. Martin builds a line of travel guitars that also share the Mojo of the Martin name. Ed Sheerhan plays a small Martin and is quite popular with younger listeners. Their "Little Martin" (https://www.samash.com/martin-lxm-little-martin-acoustic-guitar-mlxmxxxxx) is an even shorter scale length than the Jim Dandy making it an ideal student level guitar for a younger student IMO. Built with what Martin calls their HPL materials, the guitar is rugged and can withstand the occasional knock or being left outside on a hot/cold day and not suffer any damage. Both the Taylor and the Martin have been favorites of the US military when they are deployed. That should give you ample opportunities to look for a pre-owned instrument. If you are buying from a quality manufacturer, I wouldn't hesitate to buy a used guitar. Buy from a reputable retailer and ask them to check the guitar out for any problems before you buy. No matter what you buy or where you buy it, always understand the return policies before handing over your cash. Most shops are very generous but you don't want to find yourself with a damaged guitar two weeks in and not have a dealership standing behind you. I would mostly tell you to go with a fairly well known name in guitars to have something worth having. Buying a pre-owned guitar gets you lots more for lots less. If you go electric, IMO buy a Fender Squier and look at the pre-owned market. In either case, buy a digital tuner, a capo and a new set of strings to keep on hand in case a string breaks. Have to shop demonstrate how to use the tuner. But discuss this with the student's instructor first to make sure you don't show up with a guitar they hadn't planned on teaching.
  20. sms_guitar

    Guitar for 11 year old?

    Hello, Without getting into a whole lot of detail, I would recommend that you consider the Yamaha C40, and then to rent it from a location that provides a rent-to-own option. Please do not be at all concerned with it being a nylon-strung guitar or that it has a wide neck. The C40 is a great instrument for the beginning guitarist. I hope that this information is of assistance to you.
  21. ronnie

    string gauge

    tone in your hands , 🙄
  22. ronnie

    string gauge

    thanks Rockerbob, an answer that is informative. 👍 Ronnie
  23. TripleB

    Guitar for 11 year old?

    My 11 year old 6th grader has come home extremely excited over the past couple months because his music teacher is teaching them how to play guitar. This week they were using the A, D, and E chords to play 'Wild Thing'. I played saxophone for 7 years when I was in school and owned an electric guitar for a month many years ago...that is the extent of my musical knowledge. I'm looking for some advice on how to encourage his new found love for the guitar without putting a great deal of money into it in case his love for the guitar doesn't continue (and because I've got a 21 year old I'm helping put through college). Do I go acoustic (that's what he is using in school) or do I go electric (easier for the fingers so I'm told)? Do I go full size, 3/4, 7/8, etc (he's 5'2")? How much should I be willing to spend? I see a 7/8 size and a full size acoustic guitar with great reviews for $50; an electric guitar with great reviews for $80...but that seems incredibly cheap (which from what I've read may lead to frustration due to sub par parts and becoming out of tune often). Are there specific guitars you can recommend? I'd appreciate any advice you can give! TripleB
  24. Rockerbob

    string gauge

    Brand, type, gauge? On a Gibson ES335 I would use the same strings I use for every electric guitar. I use Elixir nanoweb 10 to 46. On acoustic it depends on the guitar. I have a dreadnaught and I use Phosphor Bronze 13 - 56 on it. On my OM, a smaller guitar, I use 12 - 54. My favorite acoustic strings brand is John Pearse.
  25. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repeat_sign
  26. :Ii <--- is a repeat sign. you go back to the other repeat sign --> ll: and repeat the section once. The initial time thru you play the bar with the 1 under the line but skip that bar the 2nd time thru and continue at the part with the 2 under the line.
  27. Hi I’ve been practicing this tabs but I wonder what’s the highlighted items. Thanks
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