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When You Wish Upon A Star

Guitar Lesson by Kirk Lorange


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For a mere $4.95, you can download the Guitar Pro file and a printable PDF of the tab/notation of this lesson. The fee helps me to pay for the hosting and running of this site and allows me to create more of these lessons. Click here to order it. Thanks!

The Lesson explained


Who doesn't know this wonderful piece of music? It was written by Leigh Harline and Ned Washington written way back in 1940 for the movie Pinocchio and went on to become the theme to Walt Disney's TV shows, which is probably where most of us grew to love it. I just read that "The Library Of Congress deemed the song "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" and preserved it into the National Recording Registry in 2009". Cool.

My arrangement is in our favorite key, G, and our (or at least my) favorite tuning, Dropped D. If you've been learning my lessons over the past few years you have no doubt become very familiar with Dropped D.

Everyone seems to have a different idea of the chord progression for this. I listened to many versions, tried them all out and settled on this one. A lot of the time I'm just playing double stops --- melody line and bass line -- so don't be confused by the chord names I use. Also, most of the chords are 'slash chords' -- chords that use bass notes other than the root -- so that may also make you wonder.

I particularly like the way the melody line turns the underlying chords in new, momentary, flavors. For example, the E7 of the verses starts out as a Eaug for one beat (the C note of the melody line over the E chord) quickly followed by the Am which starts out as a AmMaj7 for one beat (the G# note of the melody line over the Am chord). I believe these are called 'approach notes', notes that lead your ear to the main note (the chord tone) of the melody line. There's another example in bar 8, the G. The melody uses a flat 5 there to get to the 5 of the G chord. In the middle 8 section there are a couple more examples of this: the G diminished chord at bar 24 becomes an 'approach chord', if there is a such thing, as does the A9b5 at bar 26. Very cool stuff.

Apart from that uncomfortable stretch at bars 8, 14 and 32 (it gets easier after a couple of run-throughs), there's nothing too difficult about playing this. I hope you enjoy learning this one. It's a good one to play to your kids or grandkids. :-)


For a mere $4.95, you can download the Guitar Pro file and a printable PDF of the tab/notation of this lesson. The fee helps me to pay for the hosting and running of this site and allows me to create more of these lessons. Click here to order it. Thanks!