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In My Life - A Fingerstyle Guitar Lesson.

Guitar Lesson by Kirk Lorange

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For a mere $4.95, you can download the Guitar Pro file and a printable PDF of the tab/notation of this lesson. The fee helps me to pay for the hosting and running of this site and allows me to create more of these lessons. Click here to order it. Thanks!


Here is another gem from the Lennon/McCartney team, an early one too. It was released in 1965 when they were both in their early 20s. Unbelievable.

I've done this in -- you guessed it -- the key of G. As always, it proved to be the best. The original is in A but I'm pretty sure that they would have played it in G with a capo on the second fret.

It's got that iconic intro riff that recurs throughout the tune. I added a momentary D11 ... sacrilege, I know, but I felt I need to play something there and that seemed the most appropriate.

Like all Beatles songs, this one has a few little oddities. The first is the bass line in the intro. My instinct was to move up to the D bass note via A-B and C. When I listened the Paul, he just played B and C. Small detail, I guess, but it did surprise me. The next one is the F bass note Paul plays in the bass under the G7 chord at bars 6, 10 and the repeats in the other verses. It's unusual to play the flat 7 of a dominant chord in the bass. And not only did he decide to play it rather than the root, he pushes it ... he makes it an anticipation. So cool. I gave it a little push myself.

Another oddity is the harmony they sin in the 'chorus', when it goes to the Em. When I picked it apart I realized that they two main harmony lines are a fifth apart, not the usual third. It's quite unusual to hear that , most harmonies are a third apart, but I listened and listened and I can't hear a third in there. It's as if they skipped over it and used the third above it, which is the fifth. I tried it in the second chorus but it just sounded too weird on guitar so I inverted it. When you invert a fifth above, it becomes a fourth below. That's what you hear in bars 31 and 35. I thought it was worth mentioning.

The last oddity is the harpsichord solo that was apparently played by their producer, George Martin. I didn't even try to turn it into an acoustic guitar part so I made up my own solo. It follows the same progression as the verse and it's a fun thing to play once you get your fingers around it. Watch out for those open strings!

I had a lot of trouble getting this one recorded for some reason. There were buzzes and dead notes and stiff fingers and plain old mistakes aplenty before I finally got this take down. I'm not entirely please with it but at least I made it to the end. I'm telling you this in case you also find it a challenging piece. You'll notice that I curl my thumb over the edge of the fingerboard to grab that F bass note over the F7 chord. I did try it with my fingers but settled on the thumb. You can do either, of course, whatever is easiest. I shy away from the thumb-curl. Years ago I did a long stretch of session work where I used the thumb-curl so much it injured the tendons and I could hardly play at all, so ... beware! If it hurts, don't do it.

I hope you can find the time to learn this one. It's a wonderful composition, such an interesting chord progression. The Beatle often used the 'minorized' IV chord (the Cm in this tune) and the 'majorized' ii chord (the A in this tune) and that F7 is sublime.

All the best, until next time.

For a mere $4.95, you can download the Guitar Pro file and a printable PDF of the tab/notation of this lesson. The fee helps me to pay for the hosting and running of this site and allows me to create more of these lessons. Click here to order it. Thanks!