Toggle Menu
Read the Reviews

The video with un-blurred virtual fretboard can be downloaded from a link on the TAB

For a mere $4.95, you can download the Guitar Pro, a printable PDF of the tab/notation of this lesson and the full video in the usual format with animated fretboard. The fee helps me to pay for the hosting and running of this site and allows me to create more of these lessons. Click here to order it. Thanks!


This is a beautiful tune, written by John Lennon. I've done it in the same key as his: C. The chord progression is very simple and there's only one 'outside' chord in it: the E7, which is the 'three chord', meaning the chord built on the third degree of the scale (C is the first, D is the second, E is the third). If you know your keys, you'll know that the three chord (iii) in the key of C is Em (see this if you're wondering what I mean). I'm sure John had a listen to the Em and decided 'no, that's not what I want there', and then tried out E7 and thought 'yes'. I call these chords 'majorized minors', for obvious reasons, but there is a more correct term for them which I'll let you look up. You can 'majorize' any or all of the minor chords from a key (make them dominant 7th chords). So the iii in this tune became the III7.

You'll hear that beautiful 'add9' chord in the verse. Add 9 means, logically enough, that you add a 9 to the chord. What's a 9? It's the second note of the scale, but in the next octave above. Since there are 7 notes in the scale, the 2 becomes a 9. There is such a thing as a 'sus2' chord, it also uses the 2, but it replaces the 3. In an add9 chord, the 3 remains. (this theory stuff all sounds much more complicated than it is.)

I do like the little chromatic run up to the Cadd9 chord, that caught my ear the first time I heard the song. You'll see that the first note of the run is the 3 of the F chord, the second is a semitone slide-up, the third is the open B string. It's fun little thing to insert.

The chorus is pretty straight-ahead, nothing too difficult although the little slidey phrase that introduces the chorus might need a bit of practice. You'll see I keep my pinkie anchored to the D note of the G chord at bar 12. It becomes the first note of that phrase. So I slide up to the E, play the G note on the first string, then slide back down to the D ... all with the pinkie.

This is one of those tunes where I use my thumb of my left hand to grab the root of the F chord. It's considered by some to be bad technique but sometimes it's the best grip. I did give myself some sort of tendinitis years ago from overdoing the thumb curl, and had stop doing it for a long while due to the pain, but I'm okay with it now.

There are a couple of little hammer-on/pull-off twiddly bit in the chorus -- you'll hear them -- they're pretty standard guitar moves and they're well indicated in the tab.

That's about it ... the tune is just repeats of the verses and choruses.

If you're wondering why I indicate the names of the chords in my videos, there are a couple of reasons. First, you, or a friend may just want to strum out a rhythm part and sing the song. Second, and the more important reason, it's always good to know what the 'chord of the moment' is. Whatever chord is in play right now calling the shots. All melody and harmony are built into it in some logical way and so knowing what chord is in play gives to a sort of mental canvass to work on. My PlaneTalk course teaches a very succinct way of seeing the whole fretboard as the 'chord of the moment' The course is now 100% online with instant access. It's a game changer of a lesson, or so my students tell me. Here is the order page ... nudge nudge, wink wink.

See you next time, I've got a very challenging one coming up soon, a piece I alluded to a couple of lessons ago.

Kirk



For a mere $4.95, you can download the Guitar Pro, a printable PDF of the tab/notation of this lesson and the full video in the usual format with animated fretboard. The fee helps me to pay for the hosting and running of this site and allows me to create more of these lessons. Click here to order it. Thanks!