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Don't Get Around Much Anymore

Guitar Lesson by Kirk Lorange

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For a mere $4.95, you can download the Guitar Pro file and a printable PDF of the tab/notation of this lesson. The fee helps me to pay for the hosting and running of this site and allows me to create more of these lessons. Click here to order it. Thanks!

The Lesson explained


My attention was caught the other day at YouTube by a thumbnail image of a young Harry Connick Jr sitting at his piano. I've always admired Harry, he seems to be good at everything -- singing, acting, playing piano -- the title of the tune was 'Don't Get Around Much Anymore' which I remembered as a Duke Ellington tune my dad used to listen to. So I watched Harry perform it with his big band. MAN he was good. His playing and vocal were impeccable, his feel and delivery to die for and when the big band kicked in ... look out! I'm not a huge fan of that kind of jazz, but I do love watching and listening to the best, no matter what the genre. If you want to see a consummate master at work, watch it.

Anyway, I decided to put a arrangement together of the great tune for you and here it is. I left my guitar in dropped D and played in the key of G. G is a good key for dropped D because when you get to the V chord -- all tunes have them -- you get a nice low bass note for the root, something that's very satisfying to my ear. 

Musically, it's pretty straight forward. It sticks to the main related chords but there's that E7 in there -- what I call a a majorized minor -- to give it that jazzy vibe. I also stole that F7b5 chord from Harry's version. Such a neat sounding chord to herald the E7. Apart from that, very predictable changes. The main recurring riff is very ear-catching. I love the way it ends on the major third of the G chord the first time through, and then the fifth of the E chord the second. Very cool.

You may notice that the version in the video is a little ... how can I put it? ... sloppier than usual. I do make an effort in these lessons to keep everything as pristine, clean and rattle-free as possible. They are, after all, lessons, not performances. But there was something about this take that I really liked, it has a certain 'je ne sais quoi' about it. You'll hear it especially in the middle-eight section where I imply the changes more that actually play them. For example, the momentary Cm is implied just by one note, the same for the A7/C#.

Less is more, as they say.

Playing wise, nothing too demanding. The main riff will require a bit of practice only because of the wide intervals; also that bit at bars 13, 21 and 37 might need some attention. Descending melody lines played over ascending bass lines are always a little counter intuitive I find.

The main thing to try and nail is the FEEL. It's got that jazzy shuffle-y vibe about it with the odd triplet here and there. Definitely a case of letting your fingers dance across the fretboard.

Hope you like it!

Kirk


For a mere $4.95, you can download the Guitar Pro file and a printable PDF of the tab/notation of this lesson. The fee helps me to pay for the hosting and running of this site and allows me to create more of these lessons. Click here to order it. Thanks!