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Which System For Recording  

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  1. 1. Which System For Recording

    • Recording on PC
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    • Recording on Mac
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    • Recording on Stand Alone
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Always happy to help. :winkthumb: I'm having a blast with this thing!

BTW, I fleshed out that song today, just posted it over in the "Members' Recordings" forum if anybody wants to give it a listen and offer any tips...

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And yes you can connect the mixer to the line in as well. Glad to see you're finally getting the equipment to do justice to your musical talent Tom.

Loved your song Stratrat. Ya made me jealous.

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Thanks fly, but how am i gonna blame my playing on bad recording equipment now hmmm;) anyway the next few things may be with the old way, or i can plug in now so a combo. I saved that mixer site you recommened

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I use a PC running Guitar Tracks Pro and an RP150 as my interface. I can either plug into the RP150 directly or mic my amp or acoustic with an SM57. If I go the mic route, I push it through a Tube MP before the RP150 to warm it up a little.

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I record Eddie

I use Kristal to make my noise save it as a wave file then upload it to audacity and save as a MP3 .

I have Leaf Drums now ( so look out) :)

Iplug my guitar into a 12 channel mixer which is plaugged into my PC which acts like a pre amp .

Maybe I should post short cuts to the free down loads like Audacity and Kristal and Leaf Drums ..

They cost nothing and recording your work helps you learn I have found ..

Trev..)

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Hey hilch, I use a great free program called Switch to convert to mp3, plus a lot of other formats. It is quick, small, easy to use, and free. On this site they also have a program called Wavepad that is pretty cool also, and does a good job at editing. They both are "demos" that will keep running after 30 days, but the only thing that times out on switch after 30 days is the Batch Convert. (I have bought it because it is such a cool program IMHO!)

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Hi thanks for putting this on Eddiez152.

I really want to record something but I need to get the cash together to upgrade my computer. At the moment I'm limited as I'm using a Dell Latitude laptop which has Windows XP but only has a Pentium II processor, I have Broadband so that's good. Could any of you guys suggest what recording setup I could put together with this, it's just to start me off, I'm planning to set up a home studio in the future but at the moment I just want to reach first base, any help you can give me would be much appreciated.

Thanks

Chris

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Hey, Chris- check out some of the other threads in this sub-forum. There are a few ways you can go about getting your feet wet recording with what you have. The most basic setup, and the cheapest, is to use a freeware recording software such as Krsytal or Audacity. Both are fairly easy to use, but somewhat limited vs. a pay product. You can easily find both of those programs by doing a google search. If you want a very good program for the money that will rival programs that cost hundreds of dollars, then check out PowerTracks ProAudio- I posted a thread called "One-stop solution" (or something like that). That's the program I use and I really like it- powerful and very easy to use.

As far as hardware goes- you can hook directly into the soundcard of your laptop- not the best solution, but you can get recording (it's the way I've had to do things. My house eats all my money- leaves nothing left for music :( ). You will need to get a 1/8" jack available at your local electronics place to put on the end of your guitar chord. For vocals or if you don't have a pickup for your acoustic, you can get mics that run on USB, or some of your cheaper mics will have a 1/4" jack like your guitar chord. Again, use the adapter on that.

When you get plugged in and ready to go, you'll need to open your software, find where you are able to monitor recording levels, and adjust the microphone settings in Windows. Then you just go ahead and hit the "record" button!

You can find a ton more info in here to help you along. Check it out, get what you need, and come back and ask more questions...

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Hi Cshude, this threads been really good, I'll have to make a list of the equipment, lack of spare cash and an older computer are a bit frustrating, thanks for pointing me in the right direction, I will pop out tomorrow and get the adapters, I've got an electro-acoustic and I can get a mic for the Acoustic so I should be able to get organized, I think I'll download Audacity as x4string has kindly done a tutorial on it. Hope I can get sorted and that you can hear me soon, Thanks again. :thumbup1:

Cheers

Chris

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Looking forward to hearing the results- there can be quite a learning curve to recording. While you're out and about, you may want to get yourself a really good set of headphones- you'll likely need to go to a music instruments retailer to find a good set. You want the kind that are studio headphones. They're not as good as having monitors, but you can do pretty good for mixing. Also, you'll have to have a set of headphones to do multi-track recording if you'll be using a microphone (otherwise you'll get an echo effect). Oh, one other thing- you want to have headphones that are closed (a solid back) that fit snug around the ears. You don't want sound leaking out of the headphones that can get picked up by the mic. You can end up having "chipmunk sounds" in your recording otherwise.

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Looking forward to hearing the results- there can be quite a learning curve to recording. While you're out and about, you may want to get yourself a really good set of headphones- you'll likely need to go to a music instruments retailer to find a good set. You want the kind that are studio headphones. They're not as good as having monitors, but you can do pretty good for mixing. Also, you'll have to have a set of headphones to do multi-track recording if you'll be using a microphone (otherwise you'll get an echo effect). Oh, one other thing- you want to have headphones that are closed (a solid back) that fit snug around the ears. You don't want sound leaking out of the headphones that can get picked up by the mic. You can end up having "chipmunk sounds" in your recording otherwise.

Thanks Cshude, my shopping list is growing, we have a good music store near us, I bought my daughters drum kit there, they should be able to sort me out with headphones, while I'm there I might as well try a few guitars out and make a day of it sounds like a cool idea to me, I'll probably walk out with a guitar and no headphones, I must be strong:thumbup:

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I'll second what Chris said about the headphones. Mine don't seal well around my ears, and on one of my recordings I noticed some "sound leakage". I was listening to a click track in the headphones as I played/recorded my acoustic guitar (mic'ed), and when I listened to the finished recording I could hear the click track in the background. It had been "leaking" out of the headphones, and the mic I was using for my acoustic guitar picked it up. I'll definitely be picking up some better headphones soon.

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I have a set of AKG240's that I love, but they stink for tracking because they are a "semi-open back" type of phone. But these things are comfotable!

I grabed a cheap set of closed backed Koss phones from a dept. store for $8, and they work OK for tracking, tho they sound like dog doo. I am looking at a set of the Audio-Technica ATH-M40fs headphones. I tried out about 10 pairs over a few weeks and thought that these sounded a little flater than my AGK's, plus they are closed backed and cost about $30 less than my AKG's did. Plus most reviews say that these are relly flat, no hype.

Just tossing some thoughts out there.....

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I've got several different kind of headphones, but the phones I always go back to are the Sony MDR series. I buy a new paiar when those wear out. Comfy, closed back and great sound. I used them for tracking and mixing. If anything, they lack bass. They're great over-all balanced sound other than that and are a great mixing tool along with other monitors.

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I've got a pair of Audio-Technica ATH-M30 cans. Very flat response, which is what you want when mixing- most headphones you get through consumer electronics channels are designed to make anything sound better. When recording/mixing, you want to hear how things really sound.

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I've got a pair of Audio-Technica ATH-M30 cans. Very flat response, which is what you want when mixing- most headphones you get through consumer electronics channels are designed to make anything sound better. When recording/mixing, you want to hear how things really sound.

Very true. I'd love to hear them. But mixing with only cans can be a problem. It's good to have several speaker systems to listen to, including cans, when mixing and understand the weaknesses within each system. Even taking it out to the car. Everyone's system has different frequency responses so getting a good cross reference from several systems is good.

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Very true. I'd love to hear them. But mixing with only cans can be a problem. It's good to have several speaker systems to listen to, including cans, when mixing and understand the weaknesses within each system. Even taking it out to the car. Everyone's system has different frequency responses so getting a good cross reference from several systems is good.

Thats a great tip Steve, I burn any important{to me} tunes to cd and run around the house and my neighbors trying it in anything that will play it. Very surprising at the difference the overall sound can be. I mix with my monitors usually first, then use the headphones to try and catch anything I may have missed the first time around. Yes definitly better to mix on a variety.

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Thats a great tip Steve, I burn any important{to me} tunes to cd and run around the house and my neighbors trying it in anything that will play it. Very surprising at the difference the overall sound can be. I mix with my monitors usually first, then use the headphones to try and catch anything I may have missed the first time around. Yes definitly better to mix on a variety.

Thanks for the headphone tips most of those are in my price range, would it be best to get a set of monitors as well, I won't be able to spend as much on them, while I'm here, I was looking at a shure microphone would that do the job, any other recommendations welcome, I can't burn on to CD but I suppose putting stuff on my mp3 would do the trick. I have read the other threads but I'm suffering from a bit of information overload, I think once I've got the kit together things will get into gear. Thanks again :winkthumb:

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Monitors are a good investment, but a quality set of headphones will do just fine for now. Microphones are not me, better let the other more experienced handle that. Info overload can be quite easy to come down with. Just take your time and keep researching like you have been and you'll be fine.

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Very true. I'd love to hear them. But mixing with only cans can be a problem. It's good to have several speaker systems to listen to, including cans, when mixing and understand the weaknesses within each system. Even taking it out to the car. Everyone's system has different frequency responses so getting a good cross reference from several systems is good.

Very good points and right on the money- I look forward to the day when I can get some monitors.... and a mixer..... and real mics..... and the list goes on. In the meantime, the headphones are the first step, then it gets a listen on the desktop speakers, then it goes out to the car....

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Very good points and right on the money- I look forward to the day when I can get some monitors.... and a mixer..... and real mics..... and the list goes on. In the meantime, the headphones are the first step, then it gets a listen on the desktop speakers, then it goes out to the car....

Yep, ya gotta work with what you have!

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Thats a great tip Steve, I burn any important{to me} tunes to cd and run around the house and my neighbors trying it in anything that will play it. Very surprising at the difference the overall sound can be. I mix with my monitors usually first, then use the headphones to try and catch anything I may have missed the first time around. Yes definitly better to mix on a variety.

Mixing is such a game. The bottom line is that great mixing is another one of those holy grail things where to get a mix that sounds good on most systems, it takes listening on specific systems for specific frequency ranges.

I was so surprised when I first started recording and mixing stuff. I thought I had done a great job at making the tunes sound great listening to my headphones only. I was dissapointed when I'd pop in a tape at a friend's house. The tunes really lacked low end and any punch at all! I finally put a home stereo system in my little studio so I could hear what it might sound like on a 3-way speaker system with a 12" woof. That helped identify where it was weak for bass, but I found that my mixes still lacked punch and tightness in the low end and often clarity in the midrange.

So I finally got a decent pair of near field studio monitors (Tannoy Reveals). These dudes have pretty good flat response. They offer good clarity of all frequencies, except the low freq's I found out. My mixes started to become more clear in the midranges. Of course, now that things were clearing up I found that it was important to sound treat the mixing environment (sigh). The good news is that it doesn't cost a lot to start out, but you can get carried away with it.

So with some studio foam in place acting as absorbers and diffusers, and after getting some LERND bass traps for the corners, I was moving on up! And you guessed it, all I was doing was opening up a new can of worms! GAS can strike in the mixing department, too!

I needed to get clarity in the high midrange, so I picked up a pair of Yamaha NS10 near field monitors off of ebay. These are the white coned studio monitors. Nice. Mixing was becoming a good thing across systems. I eventually picked up a pair of their predecessors, Yamaha NS10T's. The knock on the t's is that they have an annoying high range. I modified the crossover of the t's so they could take more power and deliver more low end to alleviate some of the annoyance. They are still really annoying on the high end, but at least I can stand listending to them now!! So now I can check out mixes for any annoying or over-done equalizing in most all frequencies.

Adding punch to mixes is another story involving the use of compression and other mastering techniques like normalizing and specific EQ'ing of parts, but good mixing is has got to come first!! Headphones are also great for placing tracks across the stereo pan field. This is another way to alleviate a crowded mix.

Steve

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Thanks Steve for your insight and sharing your knowledge with us wannabee's. I really enjoy trying to better myself in the recording aspect and gathering know-how and tips from "you all" sure makes it a little easier.

I bought a pair of Event B.A.S. 20/20 monitors used 3 or 4 years ago and it was the best investment I've made to my set-up. They were expensive even used but well worth it. I listen to store bought cd's on it to help compare my recordings, and although I'm no professional audiophile it has helped with picking up on the small things that I used to miss.

I too also put a small home stereo in my room just for the comparison/convenience.

Now if I could just use my ears more in my playing I would be a happy camper.

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One other point to throw in the mix is that it is important to do some "training" when you are getting into mixing. When you find music that you like and has the kind of sound you would like to emulate, listen to it very carefully on whatever you are using to mix with, whether it be headphones, desktop speakers, etc. It really helps if you have a decent spectrum analyzer (basically a real time equalizer readout) to get a picture of what the sound "looks" like. If you mix it to sound fantastic on your headphones and then put it in the car, it may sound terrible. However, something that sounds great on your car stereo may sound thin on your headphones.

Also, in order to build clarity, you have to start targeting certain frequency ranges for certain instruments. For example, your solo guitar part in the song is likely to be played in a higher range- so, cut the low end of the spectrum out. This reduces "muddiness" in the overall mix. This tip alone has improved the sound of my mixes dramatically from when i first started.

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