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CStanton

What scales do you know?

What do you know?  

1 member has voted

  1. 1. What do you know?

    • Minor Pentatonic
    • Major Pentatonic
    • Both Pentatonics
    • Major Scale
    • Minor Scale
    • Both Major and Minor Scales
    • Both Major and Minor and Pentatonic scales
    • Maj, min, Penta, and others (dorian, etc.)


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Ledhead V-2    0
Nothing wrong with learning scales "in context". What I mean is as Nelsonite says think of scales as embedded in a matrix of notes rather than as linear movement. The players who use scales melodically can do so because they are also playing notes that surround the scale.

You play what you practice so if you spend all your time running up and down scales,that is what you will play. When learning scales,in my opinion, you should put equal time into the notes surrounding the scales so that you have more freedom of tonal movement and don't get locked into fixed patterns.

I think I gotcha...

In other words, if you're going to bother to learn scales in the first place, you should feel free to experiment with them...kind of let your fingers have some loose and free play?!

Bob

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allthumbs    8

Exactly. Think your way through what you want to say musicly rather than ripping through a fixed pattern using muscle memory. Nothing worse, to my ear, than listening to a shreder ripping through pure scales for a couple of minutes.

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Kirk Lorange    128
Off the top of my head I think I could find a G major and maybe a C major scale. I don't know scales. I play geometry.

That's a great way of putting RB ... playing geometry. I love it.

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MontanaSlim    0

I know Minor Pent and the Blues scale. I've played those in all five positions as well

as a couple of patterns running up the fretboard.

I have little or no idea how to improvise or play a solo with them or create a decent blues lick with them in spite of running through those scales 1000 times. :(

I'm planning on changing that. :unsure:

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Ledhead V-2    0
I know Minor Pent and the Blues scale. I've played those in all five positions as well

as a couple of patterns running up the fretboard.

I have little or no idea how to improvise or play a solo with them or create a decent blues lick with them in spite of running through those scales 1000 times. :(

I'm planning on changing that. :unsure:

Speaking of soloing and scales, "Guitar World" included a chart of "essential chords and scales -- without any crap thrown in" (their words) in the latest issue.

They list only five scales (A minor pentatonic, A major pentatonic, A blues, A major scale, and A natural minor) and this is what they have to say about them:

"There are thousands of scales! GW has stripped away all of the advanced (and sometimes unnecessary) scales to leave you with a handful of truly useful examples. These scales have seen the most famous guitarists safely through their careers. Zakk Wylde, Slash, and Jimmy Page use just the first three as the basis of most of their solos."

Interesting, eh?

Led

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:oops: Playing guitar for me is kinda' like having sex. I might be doing it wrong, but nobody ever said anything. I figure I may as well have fun during the process and learn what works for me as I go along. Theory is better suited for pros, I'll check it out from time to time, but for me it's really about getting down and dirty as often as possible.

As far as the guitar goes, I gained lead prowess once I mastered the five boxes of the minor pentatonic blues scale and then went about "owning the neck" in a number of my favorite keys. I named the notes as I played them and then, with hours (years) of practice, the neck became more of a fluid being to me, not five seperate boxes. This worked for me. I love the "blues scale" and while some may find it limiting, I can usually express my feelings and best play what I hear in my head within its finite context.

I've got a long way to go until I'm a "good" guitarist. I'm currently in the midst of the CAGED system which I'm learning via Fretboard Logic. The mystery surrounding our host's comic book scared me away a bit, and Fretboard Logic was right there on the rack at Guitar Center, but I'm planning on checking out Plane Talk once I've internalized what Fretboard Logic has to offer. I'm sure Plane Talk must be a strong program, judging from the stellar reviews here. I'm looking forward to grabbing it for summer vacation. So many resources, so little time. :thumbup1:

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allthumbs    8
:oops: Playing guitar for me is kinda' like having sex. I might be doing it wrong, but nobody ever said anything. I figure I may as well have fun during the process and learn what works for me as I go along. Theory is better suited for pros, I'll check it out from time to time, but for me it's really about getting down and dirty as often as possible.

As far as the guitar goes, I gained lead prowess once I mastered the five boxes of the minor pentatonic blues scale and then went about "owning the neck" in a number of my favorite keys. I named the notes as I played them and then, with hours (years) of practice, the neck became more of a fluid being to me, not five seperate boxes. This worked for me. I love the "blues scale" and while some may find it limiting, I can usually express my feelings and best play what I hear in my head within its finite context.

I've got a long way to go until I'm a "good" guitarist. I'm currently in the midst of the CAGED system which I'm learning via Fretboard Logic. The mystery surrounding our host's comic book scared me away a bit, and Fretboard Logic was right there on the rack at Guitar Center, but I'm planning on checking out Plane Talk once I've internalized what Fretboard Logic has to offer. I'm sure Plane Talk must be a strong program, judging from the stellar reviews here. I'm looking forward to grabbing it for summer vacation. So many resources, so little time. :thumbup1:

We don't mean to be mysterious about P.T. The system is just so incredibly simple on the surface that it is easy to accidentally give the whole thing away. It is also easy to miss the endless depth and complexity of P.T. without having the full information.

Some of the members on the P.T. forum have tried Fretboard Logic too. I tried it for a while but, it was way too complex for me. P.T. is the simplest learning system I have ever found. I am sure you will discover the same thing. See you on the P.T. forum in the summer.

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Cedric01    0

Chromatic Scale, Whole Tone Scale, Diminished Scales, Augmented Scale, Modes Generated By The Major Scale, Pentatonic Scales, Harmonic Minor Scales, Modes Generated By The Harmonic Minor Scale, The Bop Scale, The Blues Scale, Ascending Melodic Minor Scale And Modes Generated By The Ascending Melodic Minor Scale........... I love scales!:clap:

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