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solidwalnut

Barre Chords for Beginners and Beyond

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Cactus    0
The numbers represent the frets your fingering. BTW, your B chord is actually a C chord. A B chord would be your index across the 2fret and your other fingers or finger covering the 2,3,4 string.

I realize i put the B chord in the wrong place on the diagram, sorry.

But, embrassed as i am, ha, man i do not get it yet!

For example. I know how to Barre a F/G/A, etc. It is the "(numbers and diagram)" I cannot get a grip on.....Sorry. I need a pic or something, but I am not catching the meaning of the numbers here.

Best i can explain it.

Cactus

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Fretsource    3

I think I'm beginning to see the source of your confusion.

The problem is NOT that you put B in the wrong place on the diagram (It's just the chord name and it could go anywhere).

The problem is that the original diagram, posted by TheDamon is wrong. As SolidWalnut pointed out in the post following that original diagram being posted, the chord shown is NOT B major, it's C major. - If you saw the diagram but missed the correction that followed, then no wonder you're confused.

Here's how to read the simple open E major chord using that numbering system

6 numbers are arranged vertically, like this:

0

0

1

2

2

0

Those six positions are the six strings of the guitar, with the thick E string at the bottom, and the thin E string at the top.

The bottom number is 0 in this case. That means that the low 6th string is to be played open.

The next number above that is 2. That means you have to play string 5 at fret 2

Above that is another 2, so string 4 is also played at fret 2.

Above that is 1 so that string (string 3) is played at fret 1

Above that are two more zeros meaning the 1st and 2nd strings are to be played open.

Put them all together and you have an E major chord.

The 5 string B major chord, barred at fret 2 will look like this:

2

4

4

4

2

X

The X at the bottom means don't play string 6, in this particular shape.

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Cactus    0

Well, i tell ya, you cleared things up like crystal on the E chord diagram, thanks for a really great letter of explaination ! Plus, i "got it,".... till i can to the B diagram, and i got so frustrated i laid it down, it just don't click. Guys, I think i am hopless on this...

Ihave my fingers in a knot, and cannot figure out the B diagram, or i am just plain dumb, i don't know which. ;)

I'm not dumb, so that puts me back to just plain don't get it. I know e-a-d-g-b-e, and where stiring 1-6 are, and in what order. As in yor E chord explaination... Excellent ! But then, the B has me stumped to the max as to finger placement.

You worked long and hard on a wonderful post (above) and did a great job, again..Thanks. But man I am lost on the B explaination.. Sorry.

Cactus

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allthumbs    8

The index finger goes across the second fret. The top 3 middle strings can be hard to get at first. Think of it like this. Play an A chord on the second fret with your pinky, third and second finger leaving the index finger free. Then slide the A chord up to the fourth fret. Lay your index finger across the second fret and you have a B barre chord. An easy way to do it is to just mini barre with your third finger across the 3 strings in the middle. Does that help.

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thedamon    0

The "B" chord has always been difficult for me. You can play it several ways, none are easy. My examples below will show position on the frets, not fingering.

2

4

4

4

2

X

Very hard to master above chord and get a clean sound on all notes. The rock version would be:

X

X

4

4

2

X

and can be walked like below.

X X X X X

X X X X X

4 6 7 6 4

4 6 7 6 4

2 2 2 2 2

X X X X X

Another version of the above "B" chord is:

2

4

4

X

X

X

or

7

4

4

4

X

X

The only other practical ways to play a "B" chord are versions of below barre chords:

7

7

8

9

9

7

or

11

12

11

13

14

14

I know this won't help much, but maybe it will give you some ideas that you can use.

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Cactus    0
The index finger goes across the second fret. The top 3 middle strings can be hard to get at first. Think of it like this. Play an A chord on the second fret with your pinky, third and second finger leaving the index finger free. Then slide the A chord up to the fourth fret. Lay your index finger across the second fret and you have a B barre chord. An easy way to do it is to just mini barre with your third finger across the 3 strings in the middle. Does that help.

GOT YA! (finally) . :winkthumb:

I sure do apreciate your patients, and help, and work. Very much!

Cactus

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Cactus    0

Thedamon,

Yes sir it does/will help, the more a get the grip of things, which I am strating to do. Thanks for the info.

Thanks again to all you guys.

Cactus

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too2tall    0

Steve,

I am getting decent at my open chords but still having some difficulty with the barre chords. My problem is that the crease between the tip of my finger and the middle segment is high enough that the string is not properly depressed. If I move it to where it is not under that crease then the crease under my middle knuckle is the culprit. Any suggestions?

Too2tall:dunno:

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solidwalnut    5
Steve,

I am getting decent at my open chords but still having some difficulty with the barre chords. My problem is that the crease between the tip of my finger and the middle segment is high enough that the string is not properly depressed. If I move it to where it is not under that crease then the crease under my middle knuckle is the culprit. Any suggestions?

Too2tall:dunno:

Yes, I think this is similar to what alot of people experience. Try rolling your index finger so you're barreing with more of the side of your finger. If this simply doesn't work, consider learning and using partial barre chords.

All the best,

Steve

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Fat Eddie    0

Excellent lesson Steve, and great informative discussion too. Can anyone recommend any well known chord progressions or songs which include a few barre chords to give a bit more structure to barre chord practice?

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Cactus    0
Yes, I think this is similar to what alot of people experience. Try rolling your index finger so you're barreing with more of the side of your finger. If this simply doesn't work, consider learning and using partial barre chords.

All the best,

Steve

Steve,

Where can I/we get a veiw of the "partial barre chords." This sounds likejust the ticket for me as well, due to swollen knuckle joints, and wrist stuff. Perhaps this would make playing less complicated in this respect.

Thanks

Cactus

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solidwalnut    5
Excellent lesson Steve, and great informative discussion too. Can anyone recommend any well known chord progressions or songs which include a few barre chords to give a bit more structure to barre chord practice?

Hi Eddie--

Well, there's good songs like Hotel California that get you to switch between E form and A form barre chords--good stuff.

There's an old one that I learned that helped me play continuous E form barres. It would work just as well for the A form barres.

Freedom (by Bread)

G, Bb, C, F, F#

All using the E form barre.

Change the key and use the A form barres for the song.

C, Eb, F, Bb, B

Steve

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starsailor    20

Excellent thread Steve, I do struggle with Barre chords as a horse broke my ring finger decades ago and it didn't heal properly so it isn't straight, it's not a big deal but it makes the whole process a little bit harder. These lessons are brilliant.

Cheers

Chris

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solidwalnut    5
Steve,

Where can I/we get a veiw of the "partial barre chords." This sounds likejust the ticket for me as well, due to swollen knuckle joints, and wrist stuff. Perhaps this would make playing less complicated in this respect.

Thanks

Cactus

Yeah, good question. I've been wanting to post something about these, and I don't think there is anything here on that yet (somebody jump in).

Basically, partial barre chords are playing only 3 or 4 strings at a time. For example for a partial E form barre chord, you might play the top three strings only.

For example, if an F chord is:

133211

Then you might play a

xxx211 instead.

The same formation as the Dm7 chord without playing the open D string. Or not. Up to you. It's not so much about rules is it is about making the sounds you want.

You can take that partial barre form (barre the high E and B strings with your index finger in the first fret while playing the G string in the second fret with your middle finger) and move it up the neck.

xxx433

and you're playing a G chord.

See the connection?

How about taking the A form. Play an A chord on the top three strings, xxx220, using your pinky and ring fingers in the second fret on the G and B strings. Now take that formation up the neck to

xxx553

Use your index finger for the high E strings and your pinky and ring fingers for the 5th fret strings. You're now playing a C chord.

See the connection? Partial barres and 'partial' chords are just selected strings from the larger barre formations.

Steve

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solidwalnut    5
Excellent thread Steve, I do struggle with Barre chords as a horse broke my ring finger decades ago and it didn't heal properly so it isn't straight, it's not a big deal but it makes the whole process a little bit harder. These lessons are brilliant.

Cheers

Chris

Thanks Chris.

Yep, life gave you some lemons, so it looks like you have to make some lemonaid:yes: :winkthumb::smilinguitar:

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starsailor    20
Thanks Chris.

Yep, life gave you some lemons, so it looks like you have to make some lemonaid:yes: :winkthumb::smilinguitar:

That's the way I look at it Steve, Django played with 3 fingers, so it would be a poor show if I didn't make an effort to play with one crooked one.:winkthumb:

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thedamon    0

partial barre chords

Lets take any three chord song with D G A as your chords. Use only the high four strings.

D 2324 first finger barres the second fret.

this is the same D chord you learned, but with your ring finger on a F# bass instead of an open D bass.

G 3345 first finger barres the third fret.

just like an F chord, just slid up 2 frets.

A 5222 first finger barres the second fret.

you could still play the A bass note. 52220X

Switching between these chords is not hard.

Now the advantage of this comes with when you have a three chord song in, say G C D.

G 7879

C 88910

D 10777 pinky on the 10th fret

Practice.

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Cactus    0

Thanks Steve,

I think I will try and draw some diagrams for my self, ad simply practice. This may be the answer to some of my playing situations, as to relive some pain from the knuckles/joints. Again, I appreciate all your work and time man!

Thanks !

thedamon

Thanks to you as well..... You always give out some good stuff.

starsailor

Yes sir, I can assure you I know what you mean about the horse injuries. Like getting bucked off, you get back on. Same with everything in life, the way I see it. Get up 'and do' what everyone tells you (including yourself), that you cannot do ! :winkthumb:

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starsailor    20
Thanks Steve,

I think I will try and draw some diagrams for my self, ad simply practice. This may be the answer to some of my playing situations, as to relive some pain from the knuckles/joints. Again, I appreciate all your work and time man!

Thanks !

thedamon

Thanks to you as well..... You always give out some good stuff.

starsailor

Yes sir, I can assure you I know what you mean about the horse injuries. Like getting bucked off, you get back on. Same with everything in life, the way I see it. Get up 'and do' what everyone tells you (including yourself), that you cannot do ! :winkthumb:

I've got a few injuries, nothing major, just some that cause discomfort now I'm getting older but there are so many people out there who manage to overcome major disabilities and they make me realise that mine are pretty trivial in comparison, life is for living so we should go for it.

Good luck with your playing and the barre chords Cactus, think you'll get on fine you have a good outlook on life.

Best Wishes

Chris

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Cactus    0
I've got a few injuries, nothing major, just some that cause discomfort now I'm getting older but there are so many people out there who manage to overcome major disabilities and they make me realise that mine are pretty trivial in comparison, life is for living so we should go for it.Good luck with your playing and the barre chords Cactus, think you'll get on fine you have a good outlook on life.

Best Wishes

Chris

Thanks!

We just get back on, and ride.

All the Best to you as well !

Cactus

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Fat Eddie    0
Hotel California is a good one.

Bm F# A E G D Em F#

Hi Eddie--

Well, there's good songs like Hotel California that get you to switch between E form and A form barre chords--good stuff.

There's an old one that I learned that helped me play continuous E form barres. It would work just as well for the A form barres.

Freedom (by Bread)

G, Bb, C, F, F#

All using the E form barre.

Change the key and use the A form barres for the song.

C, Eb, F, Bb, B

Steve

Cheers to both of you. I rather stupidly didn't think of playing the much used chords like G as a barre chord. Now that I know I can do that I can experiment with lots of progressions and songs. I've been doing Kirk's Pachelbel lesson which has a couple of different shaped Barres and my speed of chord change is definitely improving, although I keep reminding myself that accuracy is King and the speed will progressively improve with every hour of practice, practice, practice! all the best Ed

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solidwalnut    5
...I've been doing Kirk's Pachelbel lesson which has a couple of different shaped Barres and my speed of chord change is definitely improving, although I keep reminding myself that accuracy is King and the speed will progressively improve with every hour of practice, practice, practice! all the best Ed

Can I get an 'amen' from the guitar choir??:claping:

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