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solidwalnut

Barre Chords for Beginners and Beyond

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si16    10

Get your index as close to the fret as possible but not actually on top of it.

Here's two 6 string barre chord versions of C :-

e 8

B 8

G 9

D 10

A 10

E 8

e 8

B 5

G 5

D 5

A 7

E 8

The first version is quite common, the second version is much more difficult.

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si16    10

I know of the 6 string C that uses four fingers:

|0|-|-|

|1|-|-|

|0|-|-|

|2|-|-|

|3|-|-|

|3|-|-|

Another C barre chord (probably the easiest one) is the 'A' form:

E|3

B|5

G|5

D|5

A|3

E|3

If we're absolutely strict about it both of these chords are C/G. It's only a slight difference though.

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Fretsource    3
Just noticed when I barre The G string gets caught in the crease of my index finger (no pun intended)... any ideas how to fix this without gorilla gripping the neck?

Move your barre finger up or down a fraction.

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Bluesyzep    0

I've been having the same problem. I haven't come to a full barre lesson yet but try to full barre the first fret just to see if I can do it. The second and third strings really give me hell. Not a lesson I'm looking forward.:brickwall: I got the F chord bar down finally but that's a big difference from a full barre.

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stanleyp    0

Thanks for this thread ... have enjoyed it very much. Am presently in my 7th month playing guitar, and am working on barre chords too ... so all the hints help. I find changing from the Open chords to barre chords is tougher than just using all barres (where the song will allow).

For instance, it is easier to go from a Bm barre (of course) to a G barre and back again; than to an open chord G and back.

I'm sure this is just practice practice practice ... but I still feel pretty good when I can nail a few barrechords in a row this way!

Stan

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solidwalnut    5
Thanks for this thread ... have enjoyed it very much. Am presently in my 7th month playing guitar, and am working on barre chords too ... so all the hints help. I find changing from the Open chords to barre chords is tougher than just using all barres (where the song will allow).

For instance, it is easier to go from a Bm barre (of course) to a G barre and back again; than to an open chord G and back.

I'm sure this is just practice practice practice ... but I still feel pretty good when I can nail a few barrechords in a row this way!

Stan

Cool. I'm glad it working out for you. You were saying it's easier to go from a Bm barre to a G barre and back. It certainly is. But I like to keep my hand loose and switch back and forth between open and barres whenever I can. It's hell getting old! But keeping the hand loose is a good thing for the future.

Steve

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tomg123    0

I rarely use barre chords and should spend more time with em. I can go from F barre to open C but any song i do is smoother with just open chords. And i actually find full barres to be easier then partials for me, except when its just the high e and b strings i'm barreing

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solidwalnut    5
I rarely use barre chords and should spend more time with em. I can go from F barre to open C but any song i do is smoother with just open chords. And i actually find full barres to be easier then partials for me, except when its just the high e and b strings i'm barreing

No rules, that's for certain. I guess another way of looking at useing full barres is that just because you barre all of the strings doesn't mean you have to play them all...

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tomg123    0

Thanks solid, of course the other problem is using those 3 end fingers when i've really only worked with the first three for most chords, then the added stress of how many strings to cover with the first finger. So one full barre does it guess. There's really only one answer after all the advice and that is practice:)

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solidwalnut    5
There's really only one answer after all the advice and that is practice:)

Isn't that the truth. Whenever you want to give it a go, learn all the CAGED chords with the small fingers. You'll be glad you did.

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AX7221    0

I've heard guitarists who prefer freting say an E major form bar chord by putting their thumb on the low e string, then using thier ring finger on A, pinky on D, middle finger G then index finger on B and E. Or say an A minor form bar chord with thier thumb on E and A, then thier pinky, ring finger and middle finger on D, G, B, then thier index finger on high E. I tired to find a picture of it but couldn't. My hands are too small to play it, but I've heard people say it's much more versitle, meaning more bar chord fingerings to choose from, meaning they could never go back to the old way. Like I said I haven't been able to manage them but I'd figure I'd bring it up for completenes' sake and someone who actaully can play it can go into it.

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solidwalnut    5
I've heard guitarists who prefer freting say an E major form bar chord by putting their thumb on the low e string, then using thier ring finger on A, pinky on D, middle finger G then index finger on B and E. Or say an A minor form bar chord with thier thumb on E and A, then thier pinky, ring finger and middle finger on D, G, B, then thier index finger on high E. I tired to find a picture of it but couldn't. My hands are too small to play it, but I've heard people say it's much more versitle, meaning more bar chord fingerings to choose from, meaning they could never go back to the old way. Like I said I haven't been able to manage them but I'd figure I'd bring it up for completenes' sake and someone who actaully can play it can go into it.

Sure, why not? More tools in the tool bag. I use it ocassionally. It's not my default, but I'll use it depending on where I'm going with it or where I've been in certain progressions. It's not so natural for my hand, but then again it doesn't feel too bad. It's just not what I'm used to, and it feels like more of an unnatural stretch for me.

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solidwalnut    5
Hello!

What does small "m" and number "7" stand for.

Thanks!

Gm7

G7

Gm

The small "m" is for minor, the number stands for the flavor of the chord, in this case a 7th.

Here's how you play these three chords using the E formation barre:

Gm7 = 353333, G7 = 353433, Gm = 355333

Steve

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distrust    0

Hi I'm new here. ^^

Your lesson about barre chords is nice and complete. I'm a 21 year old guy who happened to be a guitarist in our church, here in our small village, and i've been giving lessons and tips to the young kids in our church, and i say this will be very helpful. honestly, for the past few years, i didn't even know it was called "barre chords" XD.

anyway, i just wanna share my experience with barre chords. at first, i had trouble shifting from C to F, or D to Bm. i practiced first on F, what i did is, i placed my middle finger first on 2nd fret-G string followed by the ring finger on 3rd fret-A string, pinky finger on the 3rd fret-D string then i flatten my index finger on the 1st fret. i practiced this moving from one chord to another starting with my middle finger (ex: from F - A, A-G), and i gradually developed my speed when changing from one chord to another.

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solidwalnut    5
Hi I'm new here. ^^

Your lesson about barre chords is nice and complete. I'm a 21 year old guy who happened to be a guitarist in our church, here in our small village, and i've been giving lessons and tips to the young kids in our church, and i say this will be very helpful. honestly, for the past few years, i didn't even know it was called "barre chords" XD.

anyway, i just wanna share my experience with barre chords. at first, i had trouble shifting from C to F, or D to Bm. i practiced first on F, what i did is, i placed my middle finger first on 2nd fret-G string followed by the ring finger on 3rd fret-A string, pinky finger on the 3rd fret-D string then i flatten my index finger on the 1st fret. i practiced this moving from one chord to another starting with my middle finger (ex: from F - A, A-G), and i gradually developed my speed when changing from one chord to another.

Thanks for the kind words. And thanks for sharing your experience on your method of learning.

I want to pass along the method I learned for switching between chords, and this also includes barre chords. It's a method described in my lesson, Form Chords and Switch Between them Quickly.

The method described there is a method I call Chord Planting. In a nutshell, I learned to form chords in the air over the strings and then plant my fingers on the fretboard in that formation. I repeated this for all of the chords. What I would do is to choose two or three chords at a time and switch between them in this fashion without regard to any rhythm. Then, I wouldn't strum until the chord was firmly planted on the fretboard. If I had any fretbuzz, it was a do-over.

The result is that I learned to switch between chords so cleanly and quickly that I could follow any rhythm with ease and confidence. An added bonus is that when I make chord mistakes, I can very quickly switch to the correct chord. A) people don't realize the mistake and B) this is the beginning of instilling confidence where you don't stop in the middle of playing just because you made a mistake.

Steve

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Cactus    0
barre chords are also very versatile. Let us look at the different chords you can make by just staying at the third fret.

3

3

4 This would be a G chord

5

5

3

3

3

3 This would make a Gm chord

5

5

3

3

3

4 Here is a G7 chord

3

5

3

3

3

3 And a Gm7 barre chord

3

5

3

3

5

5 Here is a B barre chord

5

3

X

3

4

5 This is one I use often, a Bm chord

5

3

X

3

5

3 Here's a B7 chord

5

3

X

3

4

3 And finally a Bm7 chord

5

3

X

The numbers show which fret to put your fingers on. Notice how the index finger covers the entire third fret on all of the above examples. Slide the hand up or down the neck to get to the chord you want.

I hope this helps those people who are beginning to use Barre chords. This is my first post, so I guess this would be a good time to say, "Love the site."

thedamon

Hey, New guy here.....

Got major confussion.

Quoting you here:

The numbers show which fret to put your fingers on. Notice how the index finger covers the entire third fret on all of the above examples. Slide the hand up or down the neck to get to the chord you want.

End quote)

OK, take the "B" here for example.

I am not getting how to understand these numbers e.g.

3

5

5

5 here is the B chord

3

X

I am blind as to what these numbers are, and how to read this. Can you give me the real elementary explaination please sir?

Thank you very much!

Cactus

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allthumbs    8

The numbers represent the frets your fingering. BTW, your B chord is actually a C chord. A B chord would be your index across the 2fret and your other fingers or finger covering the 2,3,4 string.

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