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D-Dawn

Can I fix it?

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Well here's some rather large photo's of the classical my FIL gave me at Christmas...I took it to the local shop and they don't do this type of work and would have to send it off to fix...my problem is they want way too much $$ for what little the guitar is worth monetarily...is it possible to fix at home?

The only problem I forsee running into is finding something to clamp it with after figuring out the right type of glue! I would like it to be playable one day...any suggestions?

I've included detail shots so you can see how much of the wood is left stuck to the back of the bridge and how much is left on the body...I didn't think it was too bad, but still have to figure out the right way of going about this project.

I included a pic of the tuning keys as I thought they were quite unique :) Not too bad for almost 30 years old!!

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Well here's some rather large photo's of the classical my FIL gave me at Christmas...I took it to the local shop and they don't do this type of work and would have to send it off to fix...my problem is they want way too much $$ for what little the guitar is worth monetarily...is it possible to fix at home?

The only problem I forsee running into is finding something to clamp it with after figuring out the right type of glue! I would like it to be playable one day...any suggestions?

I've included detail shots so you can see how much of the wood is left stuck to the back of the bridge and how much is left on the body...I didn't think it was too bad, but still have to figure out the right way of going about this project.

I included a pic of the tuning keys as I thought they were quite unique :) Not too bad for almost 30 years old!!

It looks fixable to me. What I'd do is try and find a luthier or even a violin repair guy in the area and let them do it.

If you want to do it yourself, some wood glue or horsehide glue and some C clamps should do the job. Just make certain you have it placed exactly in the right spot or it'll never intonate properly.

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It looks like a fun project - you are right about the biggest challange, the clamps. When I was working on my $2 twelve string, I had a welder friend make something for me. It did the job, but hindsight...I would go to stewmac.com and buy some soundhole clamps. It would have made those moments when the glue starts to set less harrowing. (the 5" ones are 12.95 each - with a $2.00 each discount if you buy three)

Check out frets.com for a "how to" lesson (thanks to Les..aka LCJones for that tip!)

Good luck and keep us informed!!!

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LoL my husband is a welder....maybe he'll make me some! Thanks all! As I said before this will be a DIY project as the guitar isn't really worth much $$...I just happened to marry the original owner so even if it ends up as wall art (*gasp*) it'll still be special to me ;)

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Payment terms sound agreeable on the clamp :winkthumb:

You can show him the modified "eagle beak" on my thread - I'd suggest the ability swivel the clamp heads back and forth or allow them to fit snuggly in some sort of caul. It would allow the full surface of the clamp to contact the bridge and top. I found mine tended to sit on an edge which made for an uneven application. (I took the bridge back off and glued it a second time allowing for the distribution)

I'm rambling...but I had fun and learned some valuable lessons for the next time.

Just have fun!

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You could drill two small holes in the bridge and top. Glue the bridge to the top and use machine screws and nuts to bolt it togeather. After it's all dried take out the screws and fill the holes with matching wood filler.

BTW, I just bought a Yamaha Classical from Guitar Center a couple weeks ago. I absolutely love playing it. The nylon strings have a very sweet tone and are easy on the fingers.

Oh yeah, if you are concerned that the glue may not hold, then use some countersunk screws and leave them in. Although I think the nylon wouldn't stress the glue too much, and should work with the screws removed. Don't forget to use washers too!

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I was wondering about that as well, fly...Seeing as it isn't a top o the line guitar, I thought about screwing the bridge down as well...but if you don't think nylon would stress it much I think I'll avoid putting any holes in it.

I've had my eye on a few classicals lately, but this was a nice suprise freebie! The best kind in my book!

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Look for an identical bridge on the net unless you want the old bridge back on for sentimental reasons. Easier to fill in and sand down where the old bridge was that trying to fit the old one back on like a jigsaw puzzle piece.

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Look for an identical bridge on the net unless you want the old bridge back on for sentimental reasons. Easier to fill in and sand down where the old bridge was that trying to fit the old one back on like a jigsaw puzzle piece.

The old one seems to fit nicely now that all of those tiny pieces of wood are gone from it...its a much harder wood than the body and cleaned up nicely without changing the shape or thickness of it in anyway.

What I need to find is a new saddle...this one is in 2 pieces and chipped in many places...anyone want to tell me how I measure to order one of those???

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You should probably be able to pick up a saddle blank at almost any guitar shop. Use feeler gauges to measure the width, and a ruler to measure the length. You want it to fit snugly but not so tightly you can't remove it.

Don't worry about the height yet.

After you shape it to fit (sandpaper and/or files!) put it in and string the guitar. If the action is higher than you want, loosen the strings and sand it down. You want the bottom to be as close to perfectly flat as possible, so put sandpaper on a flat surface and sand the bottom until you remove the desired amount of material. Don't try and remove a whole bunch at once, you might overshoot your mark. Check action with saddle in place again and repeat if necessary.

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Our friend at frets.com has a great guide for fitting the saddle. For the twelve string I got a TUSQ saddle which only required a tiny bit of sanding to fit the bridge. You could measure the pieces to get width and height - length if you have all the pieces.

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Ugh...Still haven't fixed this yet..got too busy with moving!

But I got this little guitar back out today to go for it...wish me luck!!

:unsure:

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UPDATE: Ok so I FINALLLLLY have this thing fixed!! :yeahhh: but it won't seem to stay in tune for very long. I suppose I'll see what its like in a few days after the strings have stretched out.

Dan glued the bridge back on for me and did a very nice job for a guy who doesn't know what he's doing lol.

The saddle blank (bone) I got (after waiting on back order for 3 weeks) didn't need much sanding. It was much easier than I thought! Although I did break on of the tuning keys (just the plastic part of the key...I can still turn it with pliers) And after watching Kirks little classical re-stringing tutorial I am good to go! (I hope it sounds better soon :dunno: ) Its a whole "nother" ballgame getting used to this WIDE fretboard :D Maybe I'll get better at it with *gasp* practice!

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I always get a good feeling when someone brings a musical instrument back to life. Thanks Dawn for your feedback. I have a project of my own, a kid size guitar which has had the neck broken off. Body is so badly marked it looks like junk. Sister (school teacher) brought it home from school where it had ended(?) its days. Still has the sticker inside ... Kapok brand. I know this is total garbage, and no-one will want it no matter how well it's repaired, but I'm going to do the job properly. Sometimes I wonder about myself .....

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...I have a project of my own, a kid size guitar which has had the neck broken off. Body is so badly marked it looks like junk. Sister (school teacher) brought it home from school where it had ended(?) its days. Still has the sticker inside ... Kapok brand. I know this is total garbage, and no-one will want it no matter how well it's repaired, but I'm going to do the job properly. Sometimes I wonder about myself .....

Karcey - it sounds like a good project to practice your repair skills on. It's kinda nice to have a guitar that you've invested basically nothing in - if it turns out good, you've got a playable guitar. If not, you've gotten valuable experience out of it and the loss was minimal.

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Wow this is an OLD :wheelchai thread, but I wanted to ask if anyone knows where I might be able to find just the tuner buttons (butterfly just like is on it...pics still above) for this poor little classical guitar. The bridge is still holding fine btw...just hard to tune with the peg missing!

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A couple of solutions spring to mind.

If you still have all the bits of plastic from the original key you could glue them back together with epoxy. No?... too easy or too late ... you've already dismissed that as not possible.

OK then, since a lot of modern keys look similar you could just replace the broken one. The small black screw holds the cog in place and when it's off the key comes out easily. The thread has to be the same to mesh with the cog (and most are the same anyway.)

Can't match it easily? Then how about you replace all the keys with six new ones. They aren't expensive and will keep the vintage appearance of your originals. Many cheaper guitars that I've seen have the same carved style keys that you have so it should be easy to get a set.

Let us know how you go.

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Nah I chucked the old pieces because they were to brittle to fix, but I wouldn't mind replacing all 6! I just like the white butterfly buttons and can't find a source for purchasing them (yet!) Thanks karcey!

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You'll probably buy the whole set complete with capstans and frames. You can then replace only the parts you choose. Sounds easy; always sounds easier than it really is! It's a fiddly exercise but certainly possible. Your local guitar shop, if you had one, would have everything you need.

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I think you will find plenty of detailed instructions at frets.com. You will still have the problem of clamping - stewmac.com can help with whatever tools your husband doesn't make for you :-)

You have the advantage of actually having the bridge.

Good luck and have fun with it (btw - Acoustic Guitar magazine has an article on hide glue in the March 09 issue "Available on newstands now")

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