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Eric Clapton's "Layla"

Which version of Eric Clapton's "LAYLA" do you like/prefer?  

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  1. 1. Which version of Eric Clapton's "LAYLA" do you like/prefer?

    • Faster ELECTRIC version
      26
    • Slower ACOUSTIC version
      13


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I prefer the electric version but I have to switch off when it gets to the interminable instrumental ending section.

I thought the instrumental part is one of the most beutaful slide work in rock, but any ways I like the faster one. I'm not much of a fan of eric but he puts his dang soul into that song, and the fast tempo fits the feel of the lyrics of the song to if you know what I mean.

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Ok

I'll go on record as saying EC is one of my favourite players and biggest influences, and the original recording is one of the greatest rock guitar songs ever - including the instrumental section at the end. Duane and EC both play their hearts out on this one.

I am not a fan of the unplugged version because he took THE riff out, and it has none of the passion that made the original such a statement of unrequited love.

I include Layla in my set lists at times, including the outro - and I must say it can go down rather well, and is a great piece to play over.

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I'd have to call myself a "middle of the road" Clapton fan - I respect him for his talents and like some of his music, but he's never been one of my favorites. That said, I much prefer the electric version - probably one of the catchiest, most recognizable riffs in the music world.

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I never thought eric was that "amazing" of a guitar player. He did came up with some catchy riffs, but many rock guitarist of the 60s and 70s did.

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I think one way to determine the quality of a player is by looking at those who claim to be influenced by that player - and when the likes of Eddie Van Halen, Eric Johnson, Joe Satriani, Jimi Hendrix, Robben Ford, Steve Vai and Kirk Hammet (amongst others) see Clapton as a phenomenal guitarist, that says an awful to me as to how good he actually is.

EC's pop side can be disappointing, but when he goes for it live (playing the blues)it is a thing if beauty that few can match.

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Dead right Scotty. EC the Pop singer never really did much for me either but when I hear him play the blues, (Pentatonic though they may be) I just gotta listen.

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I think one way to determine the quality of a player is by looking at those who claim to be influenced by that player - and when the likes of Eddie Van Halen, Eric Johnson, Joe Satriani, Jimi Hendrix, Robben Ford, Steve Vai and Kirk Hammet (amongst others) see Clapton as a phenomenal guitarist, that says an awful to me as to how good he actually is.

EC's pop side can be disappointing, but when he goes for it live (playing the blues)it is a thing if beauty that few can match.

Alright scotty, I think I can agree with that, good point:winkthumb:

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I kinda take both versions as two different songs.

It's really hard to beat the combination of Slowhand and Skydog feeding off of each other! I also really like Jim Gordons piano in the breakdown.

But I also really like the way Eric treats the acoustic version, the simplicity of the playing and the acoustic lead is moving to me.

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had to say the fast electric version man. they both rock, but i cant tell you how many years i tried to play the elec way like ec. the guy is awsome

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Few people know that killer riff was actually the work of Duanne Allman, he was a session guitarist at the time in the studio and was brought in by the owner of the studio to help out, Clapton and friends were stumped and couldn't quite get the feel they wanted on "Layla", if you listen close you will realize that slide sound shows up later in all the Allman Brothers albums, that bottle neck slide is unmistakenable.

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Actually, Duane was probably the only guitar player around who even had a chance to hang with Eric! After jamming with him, Eric invited him to play, by the way, both Skydog and Eric play slide on this tune!:winkthumb:

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ok, bringin out the facts are we? well, did you know that Jimmy Page was the only guitarist there on the day that "you really got me" was written. Dave Davies hadn't turned up!! sorry, for that bit of useless info, but i thought if truths were being told... all of the should be told. later guys :thumbup1:

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I prefer the original version, but admire the acoustic version for the creativity. Kinda like the Hotel California versions. They are both good but the harder, rockier versions are preferred.

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Actually, Duane was probably the only guitar player around who even had a chance to hang with Eric! After jamming with him, Eric invited him to play, by the way, both Skydog and Eric play slide on this tune!:winkthumb:

Dude, George Harrison shared licks (Badge, While My Guitar) & women (Patti Harrison/Boyd) with slowhand. If you meant "hang" like being able to match licks, well quiet George was pretty good there as well.

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Dude, George Harrison shared licks (Badge, While My Guitar) & women (Patti Harrison/Boyd) with slowhand. If you meant "hang" like being able to match licks, well quiet George was pretty good there as well.

George didn't actually play any licks on either of those songs - he played rhythm only. The reason EC ended up on 'While My Guitar' was because George knew he did not possess the ability to play the solo he envisaged for the tune.

George was a great writer/musician, but I don't think he could 'hang' with a lot of improvising players. I heard some of George playing with EC's band in the early 90's, and he took a few solos. George sounded amateurish compared to what EC pulled out at those gigs.

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George didn't actually play any licks on either of those songs - he played rhythm only. The reason EC ended up on 'While My Guitar' was because George knew he did not possess the ability to play the solo he envisaged for the tune.

George was a great writer/musician, but I don't think he could 'hang' with a lot of improvising players. I heard some of George playing with EC's band in the early 90's, and he took a few solos. George sounded amateurish compared to what EC pulled out at those gigs.

Your opinion, thanks.

As far as While My Guitar, George invited EC to play mainly because of the tension in the studio between the Beatles. He invited EC to play to get his song recorded. Although, I could have done w/o Yoko caterwauling.

Do yourself a favor & watch/listen George's guitar work on Till There Was You, For You Blue, Taxman, etc........ EC performed in a different genre of music. George was just the lead guitarist for the most sucessful band of all time!

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I am familiar with all Beatles tunes - I own all the albums and know them all pretty well to say the least. George was great in the context of the Beatles (as was Ringo for that matter), and I am not going to knock them as a band because they were awesome. No other band comes close to achieving what the Beatles did in rock/pop.

But George as a player, had a lot of great ideas, but I don't think was all that great technically. This is all subjective of course, but to me George never really made the instrument 'sing' the way a great player can. I always look at a player's vibrato, or lack thereof, as in my opinion, that really shows of the quality of a player. I can't even think of what George's vibrato was like, but I can always recall the vibrato stylings of EC, SRV, BB King, David Gilmour, Brian May, Joe Satriani, Steve Vai.

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I respect your opinion, I do not agree however.

I enjoy EC, King, Gilmour, May. But Satriani & Vai are (IMHO) just guys that play fast but have no soul.

Sometimes less is more.

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