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Solid Spruce Vs. Solid Cedar

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WTouch    0

this must of been discusssed for ages. im trying to find the difference if i should get a solid cedar top with rosewood sides or a solid spruce with rosewood or mohogany. i know that spruce will get better as it ages. and cedar sounds great dont need to age to have a awsome sweet tone. but my question i guess is if in the long run solid spruce will sound better than the cedar. for example spruce's peak will it out beat a cedar?

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Keidon    0

In my experience I have found that Solid Spruce is the better. Cedar is a nice sound, quite warm, but it seems to lack the brightness of Spruce even over years of ageing.

It is a personal thing though. I would like to think that because the greater majority of acoustic Guitars (& other things) come standard in Spruce by all sorts of Luthiers that this is also a major preference of the buying Public. (I know some of them wouldn't know)

Worth a look around this site - and you can ask Questions of Luthiers.

Cheers, KB ......... :thumbup1::smilinguitar::thumbup1:

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coldethyl    0
It is a very subjective thing, and therefore hard to quantify.

One person will love cedar, and the other spruce.

Very true!

It all comes down to personal taste.:yes:

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WTouch    0

i see thanks alot. but this raises another question. when the spruce is properly aged and played hard by strumming will it have a nice warm sound like cedar?

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coldethyl    0

Just been having a chat about this very topic with a local luthier, and this is roughly what he had to say about it.......

A cedar soundboard gives a mellower, less clear tone than spruce. A spruce soundboard is said to sound quite harsh when new, mellowing with age, whilst a cedar soundboard sounds good as soon as the instrument is made. However, whilst a spruce soundboard may continue to improve for decades, a cedar one will tend to deteriorate sooner.

But many guitarists use cedar top guitars and are quite impressed with their warm tone. You just have to be more gentle with them than the Spruce tops.

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lorispencer    0

i've found that they both do well. The oldest spruce top that i have is 40 years old and the oldest cedar is 28 years old. they both are classical guitars and both still sound great. The oldest acoustic that I have is 30 years old and it is solid spruce. my cedar top acoustic is only 2 years old so hard to tell but classical guitars seem to both hold tone. Some may find the cedar top too mellow depending on the type of music

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Keidon    0

Worth a look around this site - and you can ask Questions of Luthiers.

Cheers, KB ......... :thumbup1::smilinguitar::thumbup1:

Worth a look around this site

Oopps, I forgot to put in the site: http://www.santacruzguitar.com/woods/acousticguitarwoods.html#indian

or this one: http://www.guitarnotes.com/links/guitars/

And this is what he said;

sitka spruce

Sitka accentuates the warm round aspects of the guitar's tone. It is the most frequent choice in acoustic steel string guitars.

german spruce

This increasingly rare wood has a higher weight to strength ratio than Sitka and correspondingly complements the brightness and clarity of the guitars.

cedar

We use Cedar specifically for our fingerstyle instruments as it responds quickly and with good volume to a light attack. It is also very well suited to open or lowered tension tunings as they require the same qualities for good separation and definition. Cedar does lose tonal integrity when over driven, making it a poor choice for versatility but an excellent top wood for showcasing finger styles.

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Bill E    0

I have two guitars both about mid to late '70s one is a Martin D28 other is an Ovation mid bowl Balladeer both without electrics both Spruce top, Both lovely guitars despite what the so called "Purists" say about Ovation - Most wouldn't know difference if you smacked them around the ears with one or the other, other than what they read in pamphlets and bulletin boards.

Different guitars, different strings, different style of playing = different sound.

Go to a store play a few, go with your heart and your ear, don't listen to others because they may not know as much as you/they think they do.

I play both of mine (Not That well because I'm self taught) and they are both beautiful in their own right.

My son who is a proffessional loves them both, he has a handfull of Strats from various builders both top end Japanese and american and only desciminates on how he feels on the night.

Good luck.

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Bill E    0

My 29 year old Ovation opened a bit because the glue failed on one of the interior braces otherwise no other signs of opening up - It has been repaired.

My 30 year old Martin D28 has a small ding that had been repaired by a previous owner other than that there are no signs of opening up.

The D28 had not been well looked after by previous owner/s surface is a bit crazed appears to have been left in the sun (Probably in a car) and there is a slight bow in the neck which I intend to have repaired when/if I can find a competent luthier with a good reputation for quality repairs.

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Keidon    0
I have two guitars both about mid to late '70s one is a Martin D28 other is an Ovation mid bowl Balladeer both without electrics both Spruce top .

Sorry to be in any way picky BILL E. But I think the subject of the question is about CEDAR Vs Spruce is it not? I am finding it hard to follow your comments on tops, when your first thread announced that you in fact have TWO (2) SPRUCE top guitars.

Then - WTouch - asked this, "correct me if im wrong. but i heard that solid cedar also opens up after a while?"

You then tell us what cracks may have appeared on your SPRUCE tops over the years. I'm not sure I follow. The question is clearly aksing about CEDAR.

It is said by Luthiers and players alike that CEDAR is softer timber and therefore more Mellow in Tone, also more proned to both Dings and over time Deterioration.

I was interested in a CEDAR top Takemine at one point, but a friend of mine (the salesman) talked me out of it. He thought it would not perform the way I would like over time.

Not to say that it's not good timber, just to say that they are quite different to each other in their properties.

All the best to you WTouch! I hope you find what you're looking for.

"Don't be like U2 - 'cause they still haven't what their looking for"

Regards Keith.

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Justapicker    0
yes, correct me if im wrong. but i heard that sold cedar also opens up after a while?

Yes it will. The "opening up" is actually a loosening up of the cellular structure of the wood. The softer woods, like cedar, tend to open up and reach their "mature" tone more quickly than harder woods like spruce. Sometimes the change can seem dramatic, sometimes it's subtle.

It's also likely that familiarity with playing a particular guitar over time actually teaches you how to wring the best tone out of it.

Buy a guitar because it speaks to you when you play it now, not in anticipation of what it might sound like down the road. Because no two pieces of wood, even those taken from the same tree, are exactly alike, there is no real quantifiable way to determine that a particular guitar will mature in a specific way.

Don't rule out mahogany tops either. I have an all mahogany Martin 000-15 that sounds wonderful.

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jokeboy    0

I went through the whole "Ceader Vs. Spruce" thing when I was shopping for my guitar. Ultimately, as has been stated before, it came down to the one that sounded and felt best to me. It happened to be a ceadar top Seagull. The one critisism I keep hearing is that the softer wood is prone to ding easily. Well, I guess if you' re not careful and don't treat the guitar with love, care and respect, then you'll probably get some dings. I understand that accidents happen, but you can minimize the likelyhood by being vigilent about how you treat your instrument. After all, it's a guitar not a cricket bat!!

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coldethyl    0
Well, I guess if you' re not careful and don't treat the guitar with love, care and respect, then you'll probably get some dings. I understand that accidents happen, but you can minimize the likelyhood by being vigilent about how you treat your instrument. After all, it's a guitar not a cricket bat!!

That's a fact!:yes:

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D-Dawn    0

It's also likely that familiarity with playing a particular guitar over time actually teaches you how to wring the best tone out of it.

.

I have personally found this to be very true. The longer I have owned and play my Yamaha, the nicer it feels and sounds to me!

The Takamine ,that I do not play near as much, just lacks that extra "something". It is as if I do not know the Tak well enough yet! ;)

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WTouch    0

hmm i guess is also the attachment? yea i shouldnt be thinking of the future. if the cedar feels and sounds good in a particular model i bought then it must be destiny =)

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Bill E    0

Keith

I interpreted the question as comparing or opinions on Cedar - Spruce and I was giving my experience with my guitar.

I guess what I was trying to get across was that the D28 has had a bit of a hard life and appeared to have been left in a hot car or the sun by a previous owner, I'm sure you agree this would be one hell of a test for any solid top and may have assisted WTouch in making an informed choice.

Sorry you couldn't follow.

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