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Chaotic Kittie

Weird G-string?

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Well, my G-string sounds slightly (VERY little, but enough to annoy you if you linger on a G-string note) out of tune... and here's the mystery... ONLY to the B and high E string! If I play from EAD-strings and then go to a G-string note and linger on it, it sounds fine. When I go from the BE-strings and stay on a G-string note, it sounds out of tune.

I've checked the intonation 3 times, and that's not the problem. I've made sure the strings are in tune.

Never had this problem before, it started just a week ago or so.

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scotty_b    16

Perhaps put a new set of strings on the guitar and re-evaluate then. As strings age they can become very inconsistent with intonation.

The other thing to consider (if you are playing electric guitar) is that the odd and even harmonics are altered by distortion, and the type of distortion - this can play havoc with the G string more than the others.

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WernHalen    0

I have found this on an old classical guitar before, I thought it might have been because of the neck that was warpped. I think it lay in the sun too long... Not my guitar though. If I remeber correctly it was the D string that went all funny on that guitar.

It would be interresting to see if anybody really knows what would cause such a problem...

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I've changed strings etc and discovered another thing: it's not a tuning problem. Things sound clean if I end them on the same note on the B-string instead. I compared the note on the G-string with the same note on the B-string; they're exactly the same.

Seems like the G-string has a different clang to it that clashes with the BE-strings.

Weird, still. Now that I listen, I also now hear that it is not out of tune; it's something else, it's the 'vibe' or whatever you should call it.

Well, while we're still on the subject, I'm gonna ask, WHAT IS IT WITH G-STRINGS?

On ALL guitars I've played, there's ALWAYS something with the G-string that differs it from the others. I've found that on guitars that detune, it's nearly always something with the G-string causing it. I'm not friendly with G-strings any more. :(

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Cedric01    0
I've changed strings etc and discovered another thing: it's not a tuning problem. Things sound clean if I end them on the same note on the B-string instead. I compared the note on the G-string with the same note on the B-string; they're exactly the same.

Seems like the G-string has a different clang to it that clashes with the BE-strings.

Weird, still. Now that I listen, I also now hear that it is not out of tune; it's something else, it's the 'vibe' or whatever you should call it.

Well, while we're still on the subject, I'm gonna ask, WHAT IS IT WITH G-STRINGS?

On ALL guitars I've played, there's ALWAYS something with the G-string that differs it from the others. I've found that on guitars that detune, it's nearly always something with the G-string causing it. I'm not friendly with G-strings any more. :(

What brand of strings do you use on your guitar?

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What brand of strings do you use on your guitar?

A cheaper brand that costs me about $8 for 3 sets. But they've always been good, and I've never had this problem before; and it did not happen after a string change, nor did a string change alter it. So I doubt the strings are the problem, but I'll try another brand when I can afford one, just to make sure.

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Cedric01    0

Those cheap sets will cause tuning instability. Sometimes even the expensive sets will also give trouble with tuning. GHS, D'Addario and Darco (from Martin strings) acoustic guitar strings. These strings are of good quality and I have good luck with them. They tend to last a long time and they are priced reasonably, here in my country.

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ShogaNinja    0

I just bought a brand new Cordoba C-5 4 days ago and immediately had a luthier restring the guitar with D'Addario Pro Arte Normal Tension strings ( about $9/pack at Guitar Center.

The G string has a bad vibe that I did not notice in the store or until I had played the thing a couple days and went back to GC to see if I had indeed made the right choice. While I was there I noticed an Electric Cutaway Classical by Ibanez and I tried it out. The D string on that guitar had the bad vibe. This is where I first heard the god awful sound. I tried other guitars than the one I bought, thought I had made a decent decision, and went home to try mine again while the others were still fresh in my mind. It was then that I noticed that almost my entire G string has this same bad vibe. It's terrible and now I want to take my brand new guitar back but I don't want to because I kind of like it already. Maybe I can get an exchange for the same model and it won't have the vibe.

It does not appear to be fret buzz and on a brand new guitar with brand new high quality strings on it I find it hard to believe that strings are the issue here.

Can someone who knows what they are talking about please respond and solve this mystery for us all please?

The only conclusion that I can draw is that each object in this world has a frequency when you vibrate it. Flick a glass to get an example. A guitar however is made up of different woods, bookmatch sawn, glued together all made up of pieces of wood with their own frequencies. When you put the entire thing together and then run waves thru it, you are bound to be going thru pieces of woods of different frequencies. Somewhere in this guitar I believe there is a design flaw that is unsympathetic to these frequencies provided by the G string ( or the Mid-Range of a guitar). This is my theory as to why this happens.

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i have the SAME problem on my japanese jackson dk2 dinky. the fluctuating sound on distortion is there enough only on the g string and only on 4-5 frets above the 12th on the g string.

shoganinja, i do not think its a wood frequency problem because if i play those same notes on other stirngs it dosent happen. (how will the wood know which string is playing that note?)

chaotic kittie, did u try a wound g string? ill try that next. my friends GB&A strat copy china guitar dosent have this problem and that costs 1/5th of this.

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maybeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee its a litle bit more when i pick up, but that may be my imagination.

there r 2 single coils and bridge humbkr. all pickups selected indipendently (pos 1,3,5) and together(selector position 2,4) give this. all 3 cant indipendently have faulty 3rd pickups.

i pulled the wire and played those notes one by one and put my ear to the body of the guitar. that fluctuating overtone was there, though very much in the background. so this is mostly an acoustic problem. i changed the g string to a 8 gauge, problem still there on same frets(4-5 frets centered arnd 17th).

then i realized even in clean the sound is there while plugged in, albeit very much in the background. the distortion amplifies this i think.

ill try changing string brand and then use a wound string hope ne1 of these works. right now i have ernie ball slinky.

also where i pick makes a diff in the magnitude of this fluctuating nasally overtone but dosent eliminate it.

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karcey    42

All my acoustic guitars have odd sounding G strings. The more I listen the worse it gets. And that's both nylon and steel. They tune OK, and the strings can be either old or new... makes no difference.

When I'm playing a tune there's no discord, but if I'm trying to string a few chords together, it drives me mad. No, it used to drive me mad. Now I just live with it.

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carol m    64

My old guitar teacher told me that the G string is particularly problematic - something to do with the frequency and harmonics of that frequency - can't remember the details. On my classical guitar, the g string sits on a slight extension on the bridge to try and change the length of string between nut and bridge to try to overcome the potential problem.

My Takamine acoustic has a split bridge - 2 separate bridges both set at an angle. One bridge carries the top 2 strings (e shorter distance/string length than B), and the lower bridge carries the bottom 4 strings. The g string has the shortest distance between bridge and nut, I assume for the same reason.

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hb    0

I started a thread about this quite some time ago. My problem was on an electric and what cured the problem was buying electric guitar strings with a "wound" G string.

dunno

hb

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