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David

How often do You Re-string?

When did you last replace your strings?  

2 members have voted

  1. 1. When did you last replace your strings?

    • Today
    • Within the last couple of days
    • Within the last couple of weeks
    • A few months ago
    • Last year
    • Can't remember


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I had heard that to take them all off at once is bad for the guitar ... too much relief from the tension ... and that it's best to change them one at a time.

Does anyone have proof, or a story where the guitar was damaged because of taking ALL the strings off at one time? :dunno:

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Not wanting to take chances, I usually de-tune all of the strings gradually, going around the loop a few times until they're all loose, then unstring them all at once. As someone said earlier, it makes cleaning the axe a lot easier. Likewise, when re-stringing, I go around gradually, bringing them up close to their final tune. Finally, I manually "stretch" each string sideways a quarter inch or so several times before final rounds of tuning, which brings them fairly close to where they'll end up. This works well on my Peavy and Samick electrics and on my Washburn acoustic, but don't know how a classical would react.

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I change when it starts to sound flat. Right now it is very humid which is flattening the sound anyhow so I will not restring. Besides, I'm getting a Breedlove AD20/SM soon so I'm saving every penny. :claping:

Wayne

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I usually change mine every six weeks or so. Often around the time my son has a haircut as the music shop is next door - it`s a good reminder!

I`m not too keen on the sound of new strings - I find them over bright and squeaky - for me they are at their best a few days after the evil deed.

Never had any problems taking the whole lot off at once, though on occasion, if I`m not bothering with cleaning the guitar, I`ll leave the low E on until all the other strings are replaced - using it to get the initial tuning about right.

Will

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Thanks for the tip, allthumbs. I'll keep that in mind for the next restring.

i heared if you are going to put a guitar away for a long time you should back off the pressure of the strings because its not good to leave then set for a long time under pressure:dunno: Is this true?

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What do you use to clean your guitar? I clean twice a year. I use a Jim Dunlop guitar polish for the main body, fast fret followed by some lemon oil for the fretboard(you would be amased how much dirt comes off) and for the fiddly bits ie, bridge, pickups, tuners, I use an electrical airbrush. I allways use a lint free cloth(an old t/shirt).:smilinguitar:

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i heared if you are going to put a guitar away for a long time you should back off the pressure of the strings because its not good to leave then set for a long time under pressure:dunno: Is this true?

I don't have facts on this but think about it. If you play your guitar every day for years, your not going to loosen the strings at any point. Would you damage the guitar as a result of this? Nope.

I would think loosening the strings for storage would CAUSE damage because the guitar is designed to have that tension on it, without it for an extended amount of time could cause problems when you introduce the tension again.

Just my observation. :yes:

Wayne

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I don't have facts on this but think about it. If you play your guitar every day for years, your not going to loosen the strings at any point. Would you damage the guitar as a result of this? Nope.

I would think loosening the strings for storage would CAUSE damage because the guitar is designed to have that tension on it, without it for an extended amount of time could cause problems when you introduce the tension again.

Just my observation. :yes:

Wayne

Hmm. It has been my first hand experience as well as hearing countless stories, that leaving a guitar unplayed under tension for long periods of time can cause the bridge to lift towards the neck which eventually will raise the string height till it is unplayable. If caught soon enough, the bridge can be shaved down. If not , it is firewood or a lap slide guitar. I am just talking acoustics and hollow bodies, not solid slabs of wood.

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Hmm. It has been my first hand experience as well as hearing countless stories, that leaving a guitar unplayed under tension for long periods of time can cause the bridge to lift towards the neck which eventually will raise the string height till it is unplayable. If caught soon enough, the bridge can be shaved down. If not , it is firewood or a lap slide guitar. I am just talking acoustics and hollow bodies, not solid slabs of wood.

But think about it, what's the difference? Playing it every day or once a week, or having it just sit there. The tension is still constant. Actually, worse if you are playing it with bends and just the act of fretting.

I think a guitar that goes to pot just sitting there was heading that way anyhow and maybe you would not notice the degredation if you are playing every day.

Wayne

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But think about it, what's the difference? Playing it every day or once a week, or having it just sit there. The tension is still constant. Actually, worse if you are playing it with bends and just the act of fretting.

I think a guitar that goes to pot just sitting there was heading that way anyhow and maybe you would not notice the degredation if you are playing every day.

Wayne

The actual playing of the guitar changes the tension of the strings, I am not sure why but, it breaks the constant tension on the guitar. I am talking 3 to six months and over, Just go to any guitar shop and ask them. It only takes 20 minutes of playing a guitar every couple of months to prevent it. Leave a guitar tuned in a closet for 3 years and the odds are the bridge will be pulled up and you will have a hump in your guitar.

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The actual playing of the guitar changes the tension of the strings, I am not sure why but, it breaks the constant tension on the guitar. I am talking 3 to six months and over, Just go to any guitar shop and ask them. It only takes 20 minutes of playing a guitar every couple of months to prevent it. Leave a guitar tuned in a closet for 3 years and the odds are the bridge will be pulled up and you will have a hump in your guitar.

i just bought a gretsch 5989 dorado and there is a hump behind the bridge, the ladie i bought it from said it hadn't been played in a long time and it was under pressure when i bought it. i didn't pay much for the 3/4 sized guitar but it sure does have a nice sound. so i think you are right about not leaveing a guitar sit with pressure on the bridge (for a long time). the bridge is starting to lift up a little. can the hump be removed and reglue the bridge down?

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i just bought a gretsch 5989 dorado and there is a hump behind the bridge, the ladie i bought it from said it hadn't been played in a long time and it was under pressure when i bought it. i didn't pay much for the 3/4 sized guitar but it sure does have a nice sound. so i think you are right about not leaveing a guitar sit with pressure on the bridge (for a long time). the bridge is starting to lift up a little. can the hump be removed and reglue the bridge down?

No. What is usually done is the bridge is shaved down to lower the string height back to where it should be. It might be possible to get the hump out but, it would be very expensive and I have never heard of it being done.

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thank you for the info, the guitar isn't worth very much so it wouldn't be worth fixing. i will give the guitar to my grand childern so hopefully they will take up an interest in this wonderfull hobby. thanks again

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thank you for the info, the guitar isn't worth very much so it wouldn't be worth fixing. i will give the guitar to my grand childern so hopefully they will take up an interest in this wonderfull hobby. thanks again

Keep it for a lap slide guitar. The last thing you want to do is give a guitar that is all but unplayable to someone. It will discourage them from playing. If your grand kids are just toddlers than that would be fine but, if they are old enough to consider guitar as a hobby they may draw the wrong conclusions if that is the only guitar they have to go by.

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they are four and six and the guitars really sounds good and it stays in tune.

Should be ok then. The problem is with the bridge bending towards the neck, the strings are getting further away from the fretboard which will make it difficult to fret. If it hasn't reached that point yet then you could keep it for yourself .

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Should be ok then. The problem is with the bridge bending towards the neck, the strings are getting further away from the fretboard which will make it difficult to fret. If it hasn't reached that point yet then you could keep it for yourself .

this guitar has an adjustable bridge, so i could lower the strings (a nice feature ). i do appreciate all your comments. it sure is nice to have this site available. :claping:

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I remember Tommy Emmanuel changing strings every day! Once in a studio, I watched him changing his strings and he took them all off in one go, something I have always avoided because I had heard that to take them all off at once is bad for the guitar ... too much relief from the tension ... and that it's best to change them one at a time. I told Tommy this ... you should have seen the look he gave me!

Hoh, this reminds me of my old guitar teacher... the dude was a freaking nightmare. I'd NEVER let him change strings on my guitar. I take off all strings about every 4th or 5th time I change strings, to clean the fretboard, but of course I loose the tension on them before I do that. My teacher did not. He just took cutting pliers and snapped them all of, in full tension..... I can't imagine the health of his guitars.

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I have to change them at least monthly, you can tell what songs I have been learning by the rust patches on the strings. I have some super sweat that if I could harness would rot a ship in seconds.

I hate the sound of new strings on my acoustics, to bright! I love it when they mellow out a bit for a great warm tone.

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