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David

How often do You Re-string?

When did you last replace your strings?  

2 members have voted

  1. 1. When did you last replace your strings?

    • Today
    • Within the last couple of days
    • Within the last couple of weeks
    • A few months ago
    • Last year
    • Can't remember


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David    0

I'm always amazed at how much I love the sound of my guitar when I put some fresh strings on. For a while I was using those pricey coated strings for longer life, lately I have been changing more frequently with el-cheapo strings.

Just for fun, when was the last time you changed your stings?

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Andy S    9

I practice almost every day, but I don't play at church as frequently as I used to. For some reason, I sweat more when I'm playing at church practice and on Sunday morning service. I will say this, I have been a lot better at washing my hands recently before touching any of the guitars. So, I think the strings are lasting a bit longer that they used to.

Years ago, When I played 6 nights a week, I changed strings each week if not twice a week. Yeh! The tone is really sweet when they're new. I tried some of the coated strings a few years ago and wasn't really impressed. I have heard that the newer versions are much improved, but for now I'll stick with my D'Adderio strings.

Just my 2 cents worth

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Kirk Lorange    128

I change them as rarely as possible, only because I loathe the process. I'm fortunate in that my body chemistry is kind to strings -- I don't sweat acid like some people -- so I really only need to change them when they start flattening out at the frets. But, you're right, there's nothing like the sound of a re-strung guitar.

I remember Tommy Emmanuel changing strings every day! Once in a studio, I watched him changing his strings and he took them all off in one go, something I have always avoided because I had heard that to take them all off at once is bad for the guitar ... too much relief from the tension ... and that it's best to change them one at a time. I told Tommy this ... you should have seen the look he gave me!

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Andy S    9

"something I have always avoided because I had heard that to take them all off at once is bad for the guitar ... too much relief from the tension ... and that it's best to change them one at a time."

Similar to what I was taught. I was told it was ok once in a while, as when you would be making adjustments to the neck or something, but not when you change strings. I have read some stuff about Tommy E. and can only imagine his reaction!

Oh, by the way, I should be receiving the DVD & book any day!! I CANNOT wait! I'll dive into it and then let you know!

Thanks!

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Jean    0
"something I have always avoided because I had heard that to take them all off at once is bad for the guitar ... too much relief from the tension ... and that it's best to change them one at a time."

Similar to what I was taught. I was told it was ok once in a while, as when you would be making adjustments to the neck or something, but not when you change strings. I have read some stuff about Tommy E. and can only imagine his reaction!

Oh, by the way, I should be receiving the DVD & book any day!! I CANNOT wait! I'll dive into it and then let you know!

Thanks!

I am convinced that the Plane Talk book and DVD are great, it sounds like you put heaps of work into it Kirk, As soon as I save up some (all my money is going into my soon to be three year old Thoroughbred or StandardBred at the moment) Or convince my dad to get it for me, I will buy it! Kirk, how much better could I play, after learning all that info?

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Kirk Lorange    128
Similar to what I was taught. I was told it was ok once in a while, as when you would be making adjustments to the neck or something, but not when you change strings. I have read some stuff about Tommy E. and can only imagine his reaction!

Oh, by the way, I should be receiving the DVD & book any day!! I CANNOT wait! I'll dive into it and then let you know!

Thanks!

It can't be far away Andrew, although things slow down a bit before Christmas. Let me know when it arrives.

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Kirk Lorange    128
Was it the look of :eek: or :mad: or :rolleyes: ?

None of those ... I looked, but none are dark enough.

(Sorry Jean ... I seem to have done something to the full message you posted ... too many check boxes ...)

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Stephen    0

I took all of my strings off innumerable times before I knew you weren't supposed to, because it makes cleaning and polishing easier. Nothing untoward ever happened, and I suspect it won't unless you leave the strings off and put the guitar outside on the verandah. On the other hand, a guitar that is already having a neck problem might just get tipped over the edge if all the tension comes off suddenly, so I'm a little more careful these days.

If I'm doing a gig (only about once or twice a year) I like to put new strings on a few days before (no later than a few hours before a performance). Very new strings are way too bright for me, virtually unplayable.

If I'm not doing a gig I can usually get two or three months out of a set of steel strings and a year out of a set of nylons.

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Andy S    9

Kirk,

Got home from work today and THERE IT WAS!! Really cool format with the conversation and the drawings. Some stuff (so far) is a refresher, but the way you put it...makes more sense AND, since it's in a visual presentation, so much easier to remember! I'm doing as you suggested in the beginning, read it through, then go through it again going for the details and really getting into it.

So far, so good. Only problem is I have to resist the urge to stay up late going through it. Gotta work a day gig! Gotta get the rest!

I'll let you know in a day or two of the progress made!

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papadog65    0

I'm kind of a cheapskate. I haven't played outside of my practice sessions and lessons at all, so my strings can get pretty dented over around four month's time. When I change strings I usuallly put on some Ernie Ball 10s and clean the axe throughly with a damp cloth and a vacuum cleaner. I've thought about putting on a heavier string to see if the sustain improves. I have an electric Peavy guitar.

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For my gigging acoustics I'll change them out about every 3 gigs and that equals about 12 hours of playing. I've let some sets stay on guitars for years, especially electrics. You can do so much to process the tone of an electric guitar that string life can have very little to do with the final tone in the long run. There's also a part of me that enjoys playing 'dead' strings on electrics too.

My fingers are also very acidic. I'll post a pic later today of how black my fingers can get while playing guitar.

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mcknett    1

I asked the good folks at Martin about replacing strings one at a time or all at once...they said remove them all and then replace. I'm comfortable with that.

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coldethyl    0
I remember Tommy Emmanuel changing strings every day! Once in a studio, I watched him changing his strings and he took them all off in one go, something I have always avoided because I had heard that to take them all off at once is bad for the guitar ... too much relief from the tension ... and that it's best to change them one at a time. I told Tommy this ... you should have seen the look he gave me!

He must of taken your advice Kirk, because on Tommy Emmanuel's Guitar Talk DVD he shows and explains how he replaces the strings on a guitar and he recommends doing it one string at a time.

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WernHalen    0

I've found a wonderfull product by Dunlop I think it is Dunlop 65. It is a light oil that you rub over your strings after every practice session. It cleans the strings, prevents rust feeds and cleans the fret board and makes the strings smoother. I've found that playing faster gets easier on smoother strings. I actually put the stuff on before I play as well. It does however tend to make the bass strings sqeek more... My strings last Longer this way... Another product is FastFret, but I dont like it that much it tends to clogg the grooves in the strings with cotton and that can kill the tone...

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paSia    0

so how often shud you re-string guitar? i have a classical guitar for 2 months now.. i play everyday & have not re-string,shud i re-string??

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allthumbs    8
so how often shud you re-string guitar? i have a classical guitar for 2 months now.. i play everyday & have not re-string,shud i re-string??

Have you read this thread? It gives you different opinions on when to change strings. Ball park, every 6 to 8 weeks.

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Lcjones    8

or as often as you can afford it ... :)

When learning I wouldn't worry too much about string changes. Once you get to a point where you can "hear" the difference between new and two week old strings, then you need to be on top and change strings at your whim or as required.

And in the "do as I say, not as I do" department, always record with fresh strings.

lc

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