Jump to content
Kirk Lorange

The power of chord tones 1

Recommended Posts

eskoven    0

Hi Kirk,

Really like the chord tones lessons. It would really be nice to know the picking pattern you use for the chord progressions in both of the videos. Do you cover this kind of material in your Plane Talk book/dvd?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kirk Lorange    128

Yes, eskoven, that's the main lesson the book/DVD teaches. :yes: I'm not sure what you mean by the 'pattern'. What I'm doing is creating a melody line, so the only pattern is being set up by the evolving melody itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
funkypadre    2

This example reminds me a little of how Willie Nelson plays. I've always thought of Willie as a bit of deranged Django impersonator when he plays, but I have to tell you it's the simplicity that I love. Great example, and it's consistent with your fingerstyle lessons.

Cheers,

Clif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kirk Lorange    128

Yes, Willie is definitely a chord tone player, very Django. What he's really good at is inserting a series of passing chords between two main chords and playing through them as single-notes lines. I love his playing.

Years ago my band opened for 'The Highwaymen' around Australia and I got to watch and listen to him every night for a couple of weeks. Whenever he'd play a solo, the other three Highwaymen (Waylon, Kris and Johnny) would stroll over to him onstage and watch. He played his beat up old acoustic through an equally beat up and saggy Yamaha amp.

The legendary Reggie Young was in the 9 piece band that backed them up. I enjoyed those two weeks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
funkypadre    2
Yes, Willie is definitely a chord tone player, very Django. What he's really good at is inserting a series of passing chords between two main chords and playing through them as single-notes lines. I love his playing.

Years ago my band opened for 'The Highwaymen' around Australia and I got to watch and listen to him every night for a couple of weeks. Whenever he'd play a solo, the other three Highwaymen (Waylon, Kris and Johnny) would stroll over to him onstage and watch. He played his beat up old acoustic through an equally beat up and saggy Yamaha amp.

The legendary Reggie Young was in the 9 piece band that backed them up. I enjoyed those two weeks!

Kirk:

Now that is a great story. Thanks for the reply. I've had a chance to meet Willie a few times, but sadly, I've always had another thing conflict with it. One of his old bandmates was married to a former graduate student in our department. He is certainly beloved here in Texas. I am working through some blues lessons, but I think I am going to try this exercise out when I have a chance.

Cheers,

Clif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
eddiez152    129

Kirk,

I cant help but think that your one finger chord tone melodies captures the essence of the whole guitar. I really love this.

What an excellent lesson.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kirk Lorange    128
Kirk,

I cant help but think that your one finger chord tone melodies captures the essence of the whole guitar. I really love this.

What an excellent lesson.

Thanks, Eddie. Yes, it is a good way to demonstrate it, isn't it? I think often seeing the whole hand at work makes navigating the fretboard look much harder than it is. Once you know what to 'look at', creating melody from any old chord progression, not just a two or three chord groove -- is a piece of cake. Of course you wouldn't want the 'one-finger-technique' to be your whole technique -- you'd be doing yourself out of a lot of playing! -- but, as a way of showing the power of those chord tones and how they're everywhere at once, it works well.

If you can see 'em, you can use 'em. :winkthumb:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Briandb1222    4

So, what I get from this is that it be more effective for a beginner to learn the notes on the fretboard before the chords, especially if he wants to make his own music, and not just jam along with the best just by knowing the chords only? So much to learn on the guitar, and I feel I don't have enough time to learn it all(Uh oh...I feel a song coming)!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kirk Lorange    128

So, what I get from this is that it be more effective for a beginner to learn the notes on the fretboard before the chords, especially if he wants to make his own music, and not just jam along with the best just by knowing the chords only? So much to learn on the guitar, and I feel I don't have enough time to learn it all(Uh oh...I feel a song coming)!

Hi, Brian. You'll need to know all the notes names on the fretboard eventually, but it's way way more important to know the notes in the context of the chord, and to do that you need to know its number, not its name.

Names are fixed: for example, the note at the fifth fret of the fifth string (in standard tuning) is and always will be D. But that same note has 12 different numbers, and they're determined by the chord that is in play at that moment in the tune. I won't go through all 12, but it's going to be the 1 of a D chord (the root), the 3 of a Bb chord (the major third), the 5 of a G chord (the perfect fifth), the flat 7 of an E chord ... etc. The thing is, you don't really need to know the name of that note if you're thinking along these lines. Just seeing it there on the fretboard as part of any of those chords I mentioned is all you need to know to know its function at that moment in time.

In the movie that on page 1 of this thread, I wasn't thinking "I'll now go up here and play a C note, then go down here and play a G note" ... I was seeing all those notes as 1s, 3s, 5s, b7s of the chord that was in play at each moment. I was seeing numbers I knew had to work because they're already in play as part of the chord. I was connecting the dots.

So how do I know where these chord shapes are if I'm not thinking note names? Good question, with a simple answer: There is really only one master template, and that template fits somewhere on the neck locked into position between those fretboard markers that all guitars have. Of course, I do know the note names, you do have learn them all, but when it comes to the crunch, to the actual playing, that's not what I'm thinking about. If you were to say "G major" to me, my fretboard instantly becomes a G major fretboard ... it just did in my mind's eye; C minor 7th? Again, my fretboard became a Cm7 fretboard, with all the chord tones in place. Do I instantly know what the names of those notes are? No. I don't really care. I can see them, and I know what they're going to sound like in the context of that moment, and I know that because I know their number.

It's the numbers that make them sound the way they do, not their names.

Now, go and write that song ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
solidwalnut    5

Brian, if that ^^ isn't inspirational, I'm not sure what is.

Here is the basis of what he's talking about: CAGED. There's a lot of info here, so just take a glimpse at the big picture and soak that in first. Don't get too hung up on all the info.

http://www.guitarforbeginners.com/caged_template.html

Towards the bottom of the page you'll see the fretboard outlined with all the C chords on the neck (within the first 15 frets). When you speak of the major scale in standard tuning, this pattern of chord forms begins at the nut and travels down the fretboard in the same order, every time: The C form, followed by the A form, followed by the G form, followed by the E form, followed by the D form. And then they continue in the same pattern for as long as the neck has frets. They are all C chords.

So, if Kirk is playing in the key of C major, he sees this pattern and the fretboard becomes a C major fretboard for him. If he's playing in the key of A major, then the A form is now at the second fret and the keyboard has become an A major fretboard. The A form at the second fret connects upward to the G form, which is connected upward to the E form, etc.

The take-away message here is this is the basis of what Kirk is talking about when he says that he visualizes the chord pattern all over the neck. His major concern is understanding where the 1, 3 and 5 notes are. There is also another picture of a fretboard on that page where all of the 1, 3 and 5s are on the C major fretboard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought I'd add in my .02 cent's here.. :shifty:

To solo in Dorian, as you describe, which is exactly right, you don't even have to think about 'starting on D". . As long as the D minor chord is sounding and your noodling along the notes of C major, you'll sound Dorian, regardless of stating note. As a bonus, it will sound great if you start and/or end your line on a chord tone of D min7.

I think that the D to D information comes from when someone is describing D dorian as a scale.by itself. (Especially when theory is being taught on a piano keyboard, the key of C makes it easy since it's all the white key's. The Dorian scale comes from playing the D to the D on all 7 white keys) But that's just black and white theory knowledge. I've never heard the scale used by itself in any actual music.. The music comes from the chord's playing over a melody derived from a parent key,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×