Jump to content


Loading
- - - - -

Weathering on guitars


8 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   WarrenC

    Newcomer

  • Active Members
  • 30 posts
  • Joined 03-July 06

Posted 13 August 2006 - 06:48 PM

Pretty soon Ill be going on a little trip to calgary and then to banff and I was wondering if the weather is going to damage my guitar. I don't know very much about the affects of the weather on a guitar. If its cold wat do i do? If its too hot what should I do? Should I stay far away from campfires? Should i loosen the strings? If anyone has any past expiriences or has information on this topic help would be most appreciated.

WC

#2 OFFLINE   Chaotic Kittie

    Full Member

  • Active Members
  • 804 posts
  • Joined 29-April 06

Posted 13 August 2006 - 07:07 PM

Loosening the strings is VITAL if you put your guitar in extreme temperatures. The neck can take really serious damage otherwise.
Yes, weather will effect your guitar. Though myself I consider cold temperatures to be far more dangerous than warm ones... it's enough with just a few degrees below the freeze point and the wood can start cracking up, especially ebony.

According to my experience, warmth doesn't do much more than alter the neck like hell. Nothing you can't fix with a regular adjustment though.
Unless it's really EXTREME heat, then I'm not sure. Wouldn't recommend going TOO close to the campfire though.

#3 OFFLINE   allthumbs

  • Active Members



  • 16,550 posts
  • Joined 11-February 05

Posted 13 August 2006 - 07:35 PM

This topic comes up surprisingly often. Think of your guitar as a piece of wooden furniture. You can take a chair to the Florida in summer or to Alaska in winter. Same with a guitar. Unless you have a 10,000 dollar guitar in which case you would want to baby it. The kind of heat that damages guitars is long term. If you put any kind of finished furniture too close to a fire and left it there for many hours bad things can happen. Extreme cold is not a problem till the guitar is warmed up and then you have to consider the condensation that results from that.

Rule of thumb is a guitar is comfortable where you are. You sit only as close to a fire as is comfortable, unless your a mutant, that means your guitar will also be in the safety zone. The cold is a little different because of the condensation but, most people don't go on extended winter hikes with their guitars.
You wouldn't sit in a parked car in direct sunlight all day or in sub zero temps. so don't do that with your guitar. You could however be quite comfortable in the summer under the shade of a tree all day and so would your guitar. We have had a heat wave that lasted weeks here in North America. Extremely high humidity with temps of 110. Guitars survive that just the same way as people . Stay cool and don't spend a lot of time out in the sun.

It is extremes of humidity that can hurt guitars. Take a guitar to the Amazon or the Sahara and you are going to shorten the life of your guitar, unless you take steps, and your not going to be to comfortable either. Guitars are not that fragile in most regards.
The worst that can happen on your trip is that the guitar will be out of tune from the contraction and expansion due to heat and cold. Your good to go.

#4 OFFLINE   Cedric01

    Member

  • Active Members
  • 259 posts
  • Joined 25-April 06

Posted 13 August 2006 - 09:52 PM

If you keep your guitar out of the extreme, it will be fine.
"The seeds of our destiny are nurtured by the roots of our past." - Master Po

#5 OFFLINE   WarrenC

    Newcomer

  • Active Members
  • 30 posts
  • Joined 03-July 06

Posted 14 August 2006 - 12:34 AM

thanks for the info guys i heard having a laminate guitar is good. My guitar is a solid spruce top, indian rosewood back and sides and a bound rosewood fretboard. Since I wont be staying in calgary and banff to long i guess its all good. Thanks again Chaotic Kittie, allthumbs and cedric01.

#6 OFFLINE   WernHalen

    Full Member

  • Active Members

  • 657 posts
  • Joined 20-December 05

Posted 14 August 2006 - 07:30 AM

Just dont leave it in the car in the sun... Even in a case i ahve seen horrible things happen... but that is in South Africa when the heat in the car must have been about 50 to 60 degrees Celcius... Outside was about 38 degrees celcius. :sweating:

#7 OFFLINE   bkeeble

    Newcomer

  • Active Members
  • 15 posts
  • Joined 01-July 06

Posted 15 August 2006 - 12:10 AM

The Taylor website has some very good pdf files in their Technical section.
I think Martin does as well.

Here are a couple from the Taylor site.

-burt

Attached Files


Signature? What's a signature? Oh. you mean like C or F ? :)

#8 OFFLINE   Cedric01

    Member

  • Active Members
  • 259 posts
  • Joined 25-April 06

Posted 15 August 2006 - 11:21 AM

Interesting articles, bkeeble! The humidity at the Taylor's factor is kept at 47%. When winter arrives here in Alberta, Canada, I find that 47% humidity is dry. 55% is what I like to keep the humidity level at in my building.
"The seeds of our destiny are nurtured by the roots of our past." - Master Po

#9 OFFLINE   WarrenC

    Newcomer

  • Active Members
  • 30 posts
  • Joined 03-July 06

Posted 24 August 2006 - 02:00 PM

Thanks again I already came back from my trip from dinosaur park, drumheller, and calgary. It was so dry there but i kept my guitar in a case and i didnt have a humidifier so i just kept it near water. sinks, in the trailer bath room. i returned home and my guitar is fine thanks all of you! :guitardude: :smilinguitar: :guitarguy:





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users