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Chris Romero

Are these two guitars the same beyond the limited?

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I am a newbie to guitars and I am about to buy my first. I have been surprised to see how difficult it is to compare similar guitars without having more knowledge, but I guess I will gain it one day. Are these two guitars the same beyond the "limited or exclusive" part?

Retail Link: http://www.americanmusical.com/Item--i-EPI-ENLP-BUNH3

From Epiphone: http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Les-Paul/Ltd-Ed-Les-Paul-Standard-Plustop-PRO.aspx

VS.

Retail link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007WBEVIW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

From Epiphone: http://www.epiphone.com/Products/Electrics/Les-Paul/Les-Paul-Standard-Plustop-PRO.aspx

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oldstrummer    1

From a quick comparison, I'd say these are all the same. Guitar makers frequently issue "special run" versions of their guitars, often putting some twist to the general release (different pickups, binding, inlays, etc.).

Have you played one? I ask, because you're looking at a Les Paul model, which has more variations than a dictionary has words. LPs are generally seen as "hard rock" guitars, played with a lot of "crunch," distortion and high volume. They tend to have wide, flat necks, and are known to be quite heavy (Gibson, the parent company of Epiphone) has developed a "weight relief" technique, but some maintain this loses tonal quality. Some also suffer from "neck dive," because the neck is so heavy that it naturally gravitates to the ground. The combination of weight and neck shape can make for difficult lengthy standing and playing gigs.

The best advice -- always -- before buying a new guitar is to try to play one, first. If you have a music store nearby, spend some time getting to know different guitars before plunking down good money.

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mset3    158

From a quick comparison, I'd say these are all the same. Guitar makers frequently issue "special run" versions of their guitars, often putting some twist to the general release (different pickups, binding, inlays, etc.).

Have you played one? I ask, because you're looking at a Les Paul model, which has more variations than a dictionary has words. LPs are generally seen as "hard rock" guitars, played with a lot of "crunch," distortion and high volume. They tend to have wide, flat necks, and are known to be quite heavy (Gibson, the parent company of Epiphone) has developed a "weight relief" technique, but some maintain this loses tonal quality. Some also suffer from "neck dive," because the neck is so heavy that it naturally gravitates to the ground. The combination of weight and neck shape can make for difficult lengthy standing and playing gigs.

The best advice -- always -- before buying a new guitar is to try to play one, first. If you have a music store nearby, spend some time getting to know different guitars before plunking down good money.

Chris,

Some good advice given here by oldstrummer. The end result should be the one that feels good to you.

Mike

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Rockerbob    47

As all have said, they are just difference trim on the same guitar. The catch is one may feel better than the other, for many reasons. I buy guitars locally so I can play several and find the one that calls my name the loudest. They almost always call a bit.

I've been at it for 50 years and I've owned 100 or so guitars, but the most at one time was 25.

I have 7 now, and 2 are for sale. A much smaller group, but very well suited to me. I'm also a bit of a guitar snob. I think everything under $2000 is a student model, and I'm right, of course. :-)

At the starting from scratch period you don't need much tone or pretty. What you need is a guitar with a straight neck and good fret work and a properly carved fingerboard nut. Being too high at the nut has killed many budding guitarists. Pay someone. It will be worth it.

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