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mset3    158

frost,

I think it is more of an individual preference. On my acoustic I use lights, on my Fender's I use 11's and on my Jazz guitar I use 11 – 14 – 20 – 28 -38 – 48.

I personally like low action on all my guitars.

Mike

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frost    1

frost,

I think it is more of an individual preference. On my acoustic I use lights, on my Fender's I use 11's and on my Jazz guitar I use 11 – 14 – 20 – 28 -38 – 48.

I personally like low action on all my guitars.

Mike

ok i get it,i found Dunlop DEN1150 Nickel Wound Electric Guitar Strings, Medium/Heavy, .011–.050, 6 Strings/Set.

I don't want to seem like a dullard but I hope these are what you talking about for your fender.i like the idea of using heavy strings they aren't so easy to break.i just want to get it right because I'm getting my strat soon..ive still got a bad taste in my mouth from the last time I restrung my generic that had a tremolo,this time aroun I'm a little bit more savy,(a little bit)thank you for you time and input . peace

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mset3    158

ok i get it,i found Dunlop DEN1150 Nickel Wound Electric Guitar Strings, Medium/Heavy, .011–.050, 6 Strings/Set.

I don't want to seem like a dullard but I hope these are what you talking about for your fender.i like the idea of using heavy strings they aren't so easy to break.i just want to get it right because I'm getting my strat soon..ive still got a bad taste in my mouth from the last time I restrung my generic that had a tremolo,this time aroun I'm a little bit more savy,(a little bit)thank you for you time and input . peace

frost,

I'm not to hung up on any specific brand. Right now I have ghs Guitar Boomers on my Fender Jag and Tele. 011-015-018-26-36-50

Mike

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frost    1

frost,

I'm not to hung up on any specific brand. Right now I have ghs Guitar Boomers on my Fender Jag and Tele. 011-015-018-26-36-50

Mike

those jags are cool.i was looking at them on amazon when i decided to move up in the world but then i saw this squire strat pack and instantly fell in love with the guitar.thank you for your input,its realy nice to some one whos willing to share and help.i dont have alot of cash so ive been grabbing knowlage where ever i can find it.have a great day. peace

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JanVigne    27

"as a green horn i dont realy know what strings to use when i restring,ive been told , medium and also , light.

what do you all think?"

You can begin by simply using the same type of strings the guitar was outfitted with from the factory. You can find this information on the manufacturer's web site though "generic" guitars might be more difficult to research. Unless you find those OEM strings to be totally unsatisfactory, that's a start.

There's no need for heavy gauges as they will make learning good playing technique more difficult for a student and you may risk damage to your guitar. If your guitar was not built for heavy gauge strings, they may not sit in the groove of the nut as intended and actually give you worse sound than a lighter gauge.

13's are the max for an acoustic IMO and really overkill for any electric.

Yes, SRV played heavier than that but he also had his fingertips superglued together every night before and during a show. There's no need to prove your manhood by playing fence wire. Most guitar manufacturers will give you a maximum string gauge or tension suitable for their product.

However, "generic" manufacturers don't always buy great strings, they buy strings that fit in their low production cost business model. On name brand instruments, this uncertainty isn't really a problem as the strings will typically be a known label and model. So research your guitar and, if you like the sound it came with, buy those strings again - or at the least stick with the same gauge.

Strings are whatever you prefer. However, experimentation can yield surprising results once you have some idea of a "sound" in your head. Sort of like drinking beer. Your first beer was just beer. For a while you just bought "beer". You listened to other people talk about beer and you tried a few. That's when you began to find other beers tasted different and you eventually settled on certain beers you like and those you don't. You need that same time with strings to learn what is best for you and your guitar.

Since this is a beginners forum, I'll assume not everyone here has sufficient experience to say they know the exact sound they want from their guitar, or, at the least, how they might achieve that sound. If you are really at the point where you are simply trying to make decent sounds from your guitars, I wouldn't worry too much about experimenting with strings. Stick to well known labels and you'll eventually learn enough to select strings with an outcome in mind.

GHS and Ernie Ball are popular labels for electrics.

Electrics will use lighter gauge strings than will acoustics.

The materials used in manufacturing strings are different between the two types of guitar as the electrics must use a compound which works in the magnetic field of the pick ups. Electric guitar strings will typically have some steel or nickle in their construction.

Acoustic guitars, lacking a magnetic pick up, tend to use materials which give the instrument "projection" and the ability to cut through the soundfield of other instruments in a group.

Most string manufacturers/retailers have guides on their webpages which will give you a broad idea of the tonal character of each material used. Don't expect to dramatically alter the sound of your guitar by swapping materials. Over time your ears will be more attuned to the slight differences between materials at first, like drinking beer.

Differences between strings also comes down to how the string is constructed; how it is wound or the core materials and their shape. These are factors you will learn more about as you begin to experiment with strings after you have some experience with the baseline strings that came with your guitar.

Simply select a popular set of strings and play. No matter how experienced, or how much of a student, you are, your guitar will always sound like you more than anything else. Strings alone will not make you sound like your favorite player.

Lighter gauge strings have less tension when raised to standard tuning. Heavier strings give more projection. Projection is more important to acoustic guitars.

For a student new to the concepts of barre chords, string bending, hammer ons and pull offs, etc., less tension (lighter gauge strings) will be your friend.

Therefore, for an electric guitar, I would recommend you stay with 9's or 10's on the high E string. Gauge is not going to stop any breaking if you are over-tensioning the string when you tune up.

As you build up your hours and months and years of playing, you can then look at the strings your favorite players use for a suggestion. For now, just realize they can play what they play - and how they play - due to the years of playing time they have put in.

You've mentioned you have a Snark tuner. You might want to invest in a tuner which gives you a read out of which string you are tuning. I believe the Fishman tuners do this. It will give you a read out that says you're raising, say, the fourth string to proper tension or the second string and so on.

Otherwise, don't pull all of the old strings off at once. Allow the old strings to be your guide to proper tuning of adjacent strings. In other words, I gave you a link to tuning by ear which, if you have read that material, will suggest you use the adjacent strings to judge correct tension on each string. As you replace a single string, use the adjacent strings to guide you toward proper tension.

You shouldn't be raising a string more than about one half step (E to E#, G to G#, etc.) above proper tension if you don't want to break them.

For an acoustic guitar you need to go a bit higher on gauge to give the non-amplified guitar some volume.

Generally, 11's are a good start for a student with a decent acoustic guitar. IMO extra light 10's are just a bit too light for most acoustics though, if you suffer from, say, arthritis in your fretting fingers they might be your best bet.

11's are light enough to allow bending and pull offs with little effort while still giving the guitar sufficient projection. Phosphour bronze is a popular material for acoustic strings. They will provide a bit of top end response that many lesser priced guitars may lack and they are usually inexpensive enough to replace when they wear out.

The average home player doesn't need to change strings every few weeks.

Coated strings are a good choice only if your have a problem with strings going dead after a few days or a few weeks use. If your body chemistry is not acidic and you can use strings for weeks without rapidly decreasing sound quality, I wouldn't bother with coated strings. They cost a bit more and really offer no great benefit for you.

D'Addario is the go-to string manufacturer for a good many guitar manufacturers. Martin, of course, uses Martin strings. It's a good chance your acoustic guitar came with D'Addarios.

Any shop should be willing to give you advise on strings and how to select what might be suitable for you and your guitar. If you have no local retailer, try contacting these folks; http://www.juststrings.com/electricguitar.html

Finally, keep in mind, what you read about strings is largely hype. While there are numerous string sellers, there are only a handful of factories that actually turn out strings. Proprietary formulas which make great claims on a web page may only be words when it comes down to it. Stick with popular labels and popular models for now and you'll be fine.

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frost    1

"as a green horn i dont realy know what strings to use when i restring,ive been told , medium and also , light.

what do you all think?"

You can begin by simply using the same type of strings the guitar was outfitted with from the factory. You can find this information on the manufacturer's web site though "generic" guitars might be more difficult to research. Unless you find those OEM strings to be totally unsatisfactory, that's a start.

There's no need for heavy gauges as they will make learning good playing technique more difficult for a student and you may risk damage to your guitar. If your guitar was not built for heavy gauge strings, they may not sit in the groove of the nut as intended and actually give you worse sound than a lighter gauge.

13's are the max for an acoustic IMO and really overkill for any electric.

Yes, SRV played heavier than that but he also had his fingertips superglued together every night before and during a show. There's no need to prove your manhood by playing fence wire. Most guitar manufacturers will give you a maximum string gauge or tension suitable for their product.

However, "generic" manufacturers don't always buy great strings, they buy strings that fit in their low production cost business model. On name brand instruments, this uncertainty isn't really a problem as the strings will typically be a known label and model. So research your guitar and, if you like the sound it came with, buy those strings again - or at the least stick with the same gauge.

Strings are whatever you prefer. However, experimentation can yield surprising results once you have some idea of a "sound" in your head. Sort of like drinking beer. Your first beer was just beer. For a while you just bought "beer". You listened to other people talk about beer and you tried a few. That's when you began to find other beers tasted different and you eventually settled on certain beers you like and those you don't. You need that same time with strings to learn what is best for you and your guitar.

Since this is a beginners forum, I'll assume not everyone here has sufficient experience to say they know the exact sound they want from their guitar, or, at the least, how they might achieve that sound. If you are really at the point where you are simply trying to make decent sounds from your guitars, I wouldn't worry too much about experimenting with strings. Stick to well known labels and you'll eventually learn enough to select strings with an outcome in mind.

GHS and Ernie Ball are popular labels for electrics.

Electrics will use lighter gauge strings than will acoustics.

The materials used in manufacturing strings are different between the two types of guitar as the electrics must use a compound which works in the magnetic field of the pick ups. Electric guitar strings will typically have some steel or nickle in their construction.

Acoustic guitars, lacking a magnetic pick up, tend to use materials which give the instrument "projection" and the ability to cut through the soundfield of other instruments in a group.

Most string manufacturers/retailers have guides on their webpages which will give you a broad idea of the tonal character of each material used. Don't expect to dramatically alter the sound of your guitar by swapping materials. Over time your ears will be more attuned to the slight differences between materials at first, like drinking beer.

Differences between strings also comes down to how the string is constructed; how it is wound or the core materials and their shape. These are factors you will learn more about as you begin to experiment with strings after you have some experience with the baseline strings that came with your guitar.

Simply select a popular set of strings and play. No matter how experienced, or how much of a student, you are, your guitar will always sound like you more than anything else. Strings alone will not make you sound like your favorite player.

Lighter gauge strings have less tension when raised to standard tuning. Heavier strings give more projection. Projection is more important to acoustic guitars.

For a student new to the concepts of barre chords, string bending, hammer ons and pull offs, etc., less tension (lighter gauge strings) will be your friend.

Therefore, for an electric guitar, I would recommend you stay with 9's or 10's on the high E string. Gauge is not going to stop any breaking if you are over-tensioning the string when you tune up.

As you build up your hours and months and years of playing, you can then look at the strings your favorite players use for a suggestion. For now, just realize they can play what they play - and how they play - due to the years of playing time they have put in.

You've mentioned you have a Snark tuner. You might want to invest in a tuner which gives you a read out of which string you are tuning. I believe the Fishman tuners do this. It will give you a read out that says you're raising, say, the fourth string to proper tension or the second string and so on.

Otherwise, don't pull all of the old strings off at once. Allow the old strings to be your guide to proper tuning of adjacent strings. In other words, I gave you a link to tuning by ear which, if you have read that material, will suggest you use the adjacent strings to judge correct tension on each string. As you replace a single string, use the adjacent strings to guide you toward proper tension.

You shouldn't be raising a string more than about one half step (E to E#, G to G#, etc.) above proper tension if you don't want to break them.

For an acoustic guitar you need to go a bit higher on gauge to give the non-amplified guitar some volume.

Generally, 11's are a good start for a student with a decent acoustic guitar. IMO extra light 10's are just a bit too light for most acoustics though, if you suffer from, say, arthritis in your fretting fingers they might be your best bet.

11's are light enough to allow bending and pull offs with little effort while still giving the guitar sufficient projection. Phosphour bronze is a popular material for acoustic strings. They will provide a bit of top end response that many lesser priced guitars may lack and they are usually inexpensive enough to replace when they wear out.

The average home player doesn't need to change strings every few weeks.

Coated strings are a good choice only if your have a problem with strings going dead after a few days or a few weeks use. If your body chemistry is not acidic and you can use strings for weeks without rapidly decreasing sound quality, I wouldn't bother with coated strings. They cost a bit more and really offer no great benefit for you.

D'Addario is the go-to string manufacturer for a good many guitar manufacturers. Martin, of course, uses Martin strings. It's a good chance your acoustic guitar came with D'Addarios.

Any shop should be willing to give you advise on strings and how to select what might be suitable for you and your guitar. If you have no local retailer, try contacting these folks; http://www.juststrings.com/electricguitar.html

Finally, keep in mind, what you read about strings is largely hype. While there are numerous string sellers, there are only a handful of factories that actually turn out strings. Proprietary formulas which make great claims on a web page may only be words when it comes down to it. Stick with popular labels and popular models for now and you'll be fine.

so cool.thank you for your time and input.im that green as I only started a few months ago. thank you again. peace

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frost    1

so cool.thank you for your time and input.im that green as I only started a few months ago. thank you again. peace

you were right.after i read your post i called fender and they said .09 is the factory strings they put on them.

i orderd some Fender Super 250's Nickel-Plated Steel Strings.09 s.thanx again for the lesson I'm realy liking this forum.

till next time,peace

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frost    1

"as a green horn i dont realy know what strings to use when i restring,ive been told , medium and also , light.

what do you all think?"

You can begin by simply using the same type of strings the guitar was outfitted with from the factory. You can find this information on the manufacturer's web site though "generic" guitars might be more difficult to research. Unless you find those OEM strings to be totally unsatisfactory, that's a start.

There's no need for heavy gauges as they will make learning good playing technique more difficult for a student and you may risk damage to your guitar. If your guitar was not built for heavy gauge strings, they may not sit in the groove of the nut as intended and actually give you worse sound than a lighter gauge.

13's are the max for an acoustic IMO and really overkill for any electric.

Yes, SRV played heavier than that but he also had his fingertips superglued together every night before and during a show. There's no need to prove your manhood by playing fence wire. Most guitar manufacturers will give you a maximum string gauge or tension suitable for their product.

However, "generic" manufacturers don't always buy great strings, they buy strings that fit in their low production cost business model. On name brand instruments, this uncertainty isn't really a problem as the strings will typically be a known label and model. So research your guitar and, if you like the sound it came with, buy those strings again - or at the least stick with the same gauge.

Strings are whatever you prefer. However, experimentation can yield surprising results once you have some idea of a "sound" in your head. Sort of like drinking beer. Your first beer was just beer. For a while you just bought "beer". You listened to other people talk about beer and you tried a few. That's when you began to find other beers tasted different and you eventually settled on certain beers you like and those you don't. You need that same time with strings to learn what is best for you and your guitar.

Since this is a beginners forum, I'll assume not everyone here has sufficient experience to say they know the exact sound they want from their guitar, or, at the least, how they might achieve that sound. If you are really at the point where you are simply trying to make decent sounds from your guitars, I wouldn't worry too much about experimenting with strings. Stick to well known labels and you'll eventually learn enough to select strings with an outcome in mind.

GHS and Ernie Ball are popular labels for electrics.

Electrics will use lighter gauge strings than will acoustics.

The materials used in manufacturing strings are different between the two types of guitar as the electrics must use a compound which works in the magnetic field of the pick ups. Electric guitar strings will typically have some steel or nickle in their construction.

Acoustic guitars, lacking a magnetic pick up, tend to use materials which give the instrument "projection" and the ability to cut through the soundfield of other instruments in a group.

Most string manufacturers/retailers have guides on their webpages which will give you a broad idea of the tonal character of each material used. Don't expect to dramatically alter the sound of your guitar by swapping materials. Over time your ears will be more attuned to the slight differences between materials at first, like drinking beer.

Differences between strings also comes down to how the string is constructed; how it is wound or the core materials and their shape. These are factors you will learn more about as you begin to experiment with strings after you have some experience with the baseline strings that came with your guitar.

Simply select a popular set of strings and play. No matter how experienced, or how much of a student, you are, your guitar will always sound like you more than anything else. Strings alone will not make you sound like your favorite player.

Lighter gauge strings have less tension when raised to standard tuning. Heavier strings give more projection. Projection is more important to acoustic guitars.

For a student new to the concepts of barre chords, string bending, hammer ons and pull offs, etc., less tension (lighter gauge strings) will be your friend.

Therefore, for an electric guitar, I would recommend you stay with 9's or 10's on the high E string. Gauge is not going to stop any breaking if you are over-tensioning the string when you tune up.

As you build up your hours and months and years of playing, you can then look at the strings your favorite players use for a suggestion. For now, just realize they can play what they play - and how they play - due to the years of playing time they have put in.

You've mentioned you have a Snark tuner. You might want to invest in a tuner which gives you a read out of which string you are tuning. I believe the Fishman tuners do this. It will give you a read out that says you're raising, say, the fourth string to proper tension or the second string and so on.

Otherwise, don't pull all of the old strings off at once. Allow the old strings to be your guide to proper tuning of adjacent strings. In other words, I gave you a link to tuning by ear which, if you have read that material, will suggest you use the adjacent strings to judge correct tension on each string. As you replace a single string, use the adjacent strings to guide you toward proper tension.

You shouldn't be raising a string more than about one half step (E to E#, G to G#, etc.) above proper tension if you don't want to break them.

For an acoustic guitar you need to go a bit higher on gauge to give the non-amplified guitar some volume.

Generally, 11's are a good start for a student with a decent acoustic guitar. IMO extra light 10's are just a bit too light for most acoustics though, if you suffer from, say, arthritis in your fretting fingers they might be your best bet.

11's are light enough to allow bending and pull offs with little effort while still giving the guitar sufficient projection. Phosphour bronze is a popular material for acoustic strings. They will provide a bit of top end response that many lesser priced guitars may lack and they are usually inexpensive enough to replace when they wear out.

The average home player doesn't need to change strings every few weeks.

Coated strings are a good choice only if your have a problem with strings going dead after a few days or a few weeks use. If your body chemistry is not acidic and you can use strings for weeks without rapidly decreasing sound quality, I wouldn't bother with coated strings. They cost a bit more and really offer no great benefit for you.

D'Addario is the go-to string manufacturer for a good many guitar manufacturers. Martin, of course, uses Martin strings. It's a good chance your acoustic guitar came with D'Addarios.

Any shop should be willing to give you advise on strings and how to select what might be suitable for you and your guitar. If you have no local retailer, try contacting these folks; http://www.juststrings.com/electricguitar.html

Finally, keep in mind, what you read about strings is largely hype. While there are numerous string sellers, there are only a handful of factories that actually turn out strings. Proprietary formulas which make great claims on a web page may only be words when it comes down to it. Stick with popular labels and popular models for now and you'll be fine.

you were right.after i read your post i called fender and they said .09 is the factory strings they put on them.

i orderd some Fender Super 250's Nickel-Plated Steel Strings.09 s.thanx again for the lesson I'm realy liking this forum.

till next time,peace

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