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frost

re stringing

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frost    1

recently i tried,tried being the key word to restring my generic 25.5.

i went out on youtube and watched a couple of people re string a 25.5 with tremilo and thought ok i can do this...

what a feasco it was,i keept breaking the d string,not once not twice but three times.

ive been told by one guy to use medium strings and that was what i was trying to string with .now i have had a couple of people say use light so im ordering some with my new srat,finaly a real guitar no more generic crap wuhooo!!!!

any way can any one tell me what i might be doing wrong?i have restrung my acoustic a couple of times with no prob and it plays great

with the electric i was tunning in e,a,d,g,b,e my friend made me a chart because i was tunning it wrong.

I have made a copy of the tunning break down he made for me.he can play so I trust his chart.

what am I doing wrong?

any advice helps thank you.

post-135622-0-28298300-1472590053_thumb.jpg

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JanVigne    27

I don't understand the chart you posted. However, the final tuning for each string is correct for a six string guitar (acoustic or electric) in "standard" tuning.

It's unusual to break the fourth string. Normally, one of the unwound strings breaks first.

I would make sure you aren't trying to raise the string an octave above standard tuning. You might also want to check for any sharp edges at the saddle or nut. The string must glide easily over these points or they might break as you raise the string to proper tuning.

Otherwise, it's all laid out in these video; https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+re-string+a+stratocaster&rlz=1CAACAJ_enUS705US705&oq=how+to+re-string+a+stratocaster&aqs=chrome..69i57.11568j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#q=how+to+restring+a+stratocaster

You only need two or three turns of extra string around the tuning peg for each string. Too much and the string has a better chance of going out of tune.

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frost    1

I don't understand the chart you posted. However, the final tuning for each string is correct for a six string guitar (acoustic or electric) in "standard" tuning.

It's unusual to break the fourth string. Normally, one of the unwound strings breaks first.

I would make sure you aren't trying to raise the string an octave above standard tuning. You might also want to check for any sharp edges at the saddle or nut. The string must glide easily over these points or they might break as you raise the string to proper tuning.

Otherwise, it's all laid out in these video; https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+re-string+a+stratocaster&rlz=1CAACAJ_enUS705US705&oq=how+to+re-string+a+stratocaster&aqs=chrome..69i57.11568j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#q=how+to+restring+a+stratocaster

You only need two or three turns of extra string around the tuning peg for each string. Too much and the string has a better chance of going out of tune.

thank you.im not sure what im doing,i dont want to be the guy that goes to a tech to get it restrung.i belive your right,the guitar in question is a crapy 25.5,i don't even want to refer to it as a strat style but its generic . I'm actualy ordering a strat(squire)made in asia because I cant afford an America made fender strat.ive wondered about my snark tuner when I started using it I noticed my tuning sounded different,i used it out of laziness instead as my chromatic tuner witch always makes my guitar sound correct. guess lazy is out.i cant afford to buy 10 sets of strings to break till I got it right.im not sure if the snark tunes at 440,the chromatic is set to 440.

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frost    1

I don't understand the chart you posted. However, the final tuning for each string is correct for a six string guitar (acoustic or electric) in "standard" tuning.

It's unusual to break the fourth string. Normally, one of the unwound strings breaks first.

I would make sure you aren't trying to raise the string an octave above standard tuning. You might also want to check for any sharp edges at the saddle or nut. The string must glide easily over these points or they might break as you raise the string to proper tuning.

Otherwise, it's all laid out in these video; https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+re-string+a+stratocaster&rlz=1CAACAJ_enUS705US705&oq=how+to+re-string+a+stratocaster&aqs=chrome..69i57.11568j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#q=how+to+restring+a+stratocaster

You only need two or three turns of extra string around the tuning peg for each string. Too much and the string has a better chance of going out of tune.

ok heres more of the chart,i left out alot in the last picture.i hope this makes more sence .

post-135622-0-93015700-1472608533_thumb.jpg

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JanVigne    27

The Snark is a highly popular tuner and should give good results. Read the owner's manual that came with the tuner.

Also learn to check your tuning by ear.

https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&rlz=1CAACAJ_enUS705US705&oq=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&aqs=chrome..69i57.8714j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Unless you are playing with another instrument with fixed tuning - saxophone, piano, etc. - tuning comes down to being in tune with yourself. E=E, A=A, D=D, etc. Obviously, you don't want to be so far off that your reference note is not properly tuned. However, once you have one note on your guitar tuned to even close to right, you can adjust the other five strings to each other.

Since you will be tuning by way of octaves and duplicates, this lesson will tell you about the accuracy of your guitar's set up. A 12th fret harmonic is always "in tune" in that it will fall half way between the nut and the saddle. If this isn't correct according to what the open string sounds like, then your guitar is not properly "intonated"; https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&rlz=1CAACAJ_enUS705US705&oq=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&aqs=chrome..69i57.8714j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#q=how+to+intonate+a+guitar

Checking your tuning by ear will also tell you about your playing technique. If you are fretting a string by pushing it out of tune, then you need to adjust your technique.

Intonation is more important as you begin to play up the neck but it should be as close to correct even if you only play cowboy chords.

"Generic" guitars are fine for any player if you are dedicated to learning the ins and outs of playing. They need to be set up correctly so you are not fighting the guitar but they are not the death knell for a player. Mostly, they simply lack the finest qualities of better models. You sometimes have to work a bit harder to get the finesse of some techniques but generics can get the job done.

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mset3    158

frost,

I had many guitar tuners and I also agree the Snark is a pretty accurate tuner.

Chet Atkins once said, "Are you playing the guitar or is the guitar playing you?" A good piece of advice from a pro.

Mike

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frost    1

ok thanx people.ive never had lessons so im learning as i go. im glad i found this forum,i realy need the feed back.the fella that lived up stairs was a great guitarist and moved to another part of montana so i lost my teacher .he is the one that showed me how to use the tuner.

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frost    1

The Snark is a highly popular tuner and should give good results. Read the owner's manual that came with the tuner.

Also learn to check your tuning by ear.

https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&rlz=1CAACAJ_enUS705US705&oq=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&aqs=chrome..69i57.8714j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Unless you are playing with another instrument with fixed tuning - saxophone, piano, etc. - tuning comes down to being in tune with yourself. E=E, A=A, D=D, etc. Obviously, you don't want to be so far off that your reference note is not properly tuned. However, once you have one note on your guitar tuned to even close to right, you can adjust the other five strings to each other.

Since you will be tuning by way of octaves and duplicates, this lesson will tell you about the accuracy of your guitar's set up. A 12th fret harmonic is always "in tune" in that it will fall half way between the nut and the saddle. If this isn't correct according to what the open string sounds like, then your guitar is not properly "intonated"; https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&rlz=1CAACAJ_enUS705US705&oq=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&aqs=chrome..69i57.8714j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#q=how+to+intonate+a+guitar

Checking your tuning by ear will also tell you about your playing technique. If you are fretting a string by pushing it out of tune, then you need to adjust your technique.

Intonation is more important as you begin to play up the neck but it should be as close to correct even if you only play cowboy chords.

"Generic" guitars are fine for any player if you are dedicated to learning the ins and outs of playing. They need to be set up correctly so you are not fighting the guitar but they are not the death knell for a player. Mostly, they simply lack the finest qualities of better models. You sometimes have to work a bit harder to get the finesse of some techniques but generics can get the job done.

my snark is the one without settings buttons so it must be me not the tuner.the day in question I was trying to act like the pro I am not.when I get the strat ill be taking my time.im also ordering light strings this time.thank you for your input.

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frost    1

frost,

I had many guitar tuners and I also agree the Snark is a pretty accurate tuner.

Chet Atkins once said, "Are you playing the guitar or is the guitar playing you?" A good piece of advice from a pro.

Mike

i do need to slow down.thank you for your input.

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frost    1

The Snark is a highly popular tuner and should give good results. Read the owner's manual that came with the tuner.

Also learn to check your tuning by ear.

https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&rlz=1CAACAJ_enUS705US705&oq=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&aqs=chrome..69i57.8714j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Unless you are playing with another instrument with fixed tuning - saxophone, piano, etc. - tuning comes down to being in tune with yourself. E=E, A=A, D=D, etc. Obviously, you don't want to be so far off that your reference note is not properly tuned. However, once you have one note on your guitar tuned to even close to right, you can adjust the other five strings to each other.

Since you will be tuning by way of octaves and duplicates, this lesson will tell you about the accuracy of your guitar's set up. A 12th fret harmonic is always "in tune" in that it will fall half way between the nut and the saddle. If this isn't correct according to what the open string sounds like, then your guitar is not properly "intonated"; https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&rlz=1CAACAJ_enUS705US705&oq=how+to+tune+a+guitar+by+ear&aqs=chrome..69i57.8714j0j1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#q=how+to+intonate+a+guitar

Checking your tuning by ear will also tell you about your playing technique. If you are fretting a string by pushing it out of tune, then you need to adjust your technique.

Intonation is more important as you begin to play up the neck but it should be as close to correct even if you only play cowboy chords.

"Generic" guitars are fine for any player if you are dedicated to learning the ins and outs of playing. They need to be set up correctly so you are not fighting the guitar but they are not the death knell for a player. Mostly, they simply lack the finest qualities of better models. You sometimes have to work a bit harder to get the finesse of some techniques but generics can get the job done.

I'm pretty much green and I get what your saying,im a bit tone deaf so I need to use my gizmos for now.thank you

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JanVigne    27

Developing your ear is a part of the learning process.

This is important stuff so don't brush it off simply because you have an electronic tuner.

Some people are naturally better at this than others but you MUST have some idea of when a string is "in tune" with another. Like any other part of creating music, it comes down to more than simply knowing where to put your fingers at any one time.

Learning to tune by ear is a good way to develop your ability to hear in and out of tune strings. In fact, there probably is no better way for a guitarist to learn this skill.

To do so, you will need a reference note for one single string. Many of us still have our tuning forks which gave us a reference tone for one string. Mine is A (@ 440Hz) which gave me the tone for the open fifth string, the sixth string at the fifth fret, the third string at the second fret and the first string at the fifth fret. From there, I tuned each string to another string's tone.

Some used a piano or another instrument for a reference tone but we were tuning one string to the sound of that one note and then adjusting each string to that one note reference.

From there, once one string is properly tuned to pitch, you tune each string to the next adjacent string. You eventually play octaves and duplicates to recheck your work. Some people use harmonics but that is a bit down the line for a student.

Unfortunately, electronic tuners only serve to allow a student player the very bad habit of not learning an important part of playing music.

I would strongly suggest you put in time learning the sound of "in tune" strings and implanting in your head the sound of out of tune strings.

If you have no other reference tone, use your electronic tuner to raise only one string to proper pitch and then adjust the other five by ear. After you feel you have done a decent job by ear, use the electronic tuner to check your work.

Remember, new strings will take a while to stretch out before they hold a tune. So don't be disappointed if you are having a hard time tuning new strings. Do your best but know that learning this is important to your development as a player.

Let's say you have one string tuned to proper pitch according to your electronic tuner and now you are trying to tune to that string's fifth fret note as explained in the links I gave earlier. OK, if you have the D string at pitch and you are trying to bring the G string into tune, adjust your tuning key until you feel you are in the ballpark.

Hold down the D string at the fifth fret and strike both the third and the fourth strings simultaneously. Keep holding down the D string as you reach across with your picking hand to adjust the tuning key for the third string. Slowly raise or lower its tension until you hear two notes sounding as one. That's when you will be fretting a G note on the fourth string and plucking an open G on the third.

Listen to the sound and do this as an exercise. You should at the very least, re-check your tuning every time you pick up your guitar to play. Like a TV gunslinger checking their revolver, you don't go put it out on the line until you know your equipment is in tip top shape.

Never severely over-tighten a string without checking yourself against the other string.

Fret your D string at the fifth fret to check yourself. If you are good at tuning by ear, you'll be pretty close to dead on. If not but you aren't sure how to tune the G string - up or down, then you move your fretting finger up a fret to the sixth fret and compare. Better? Or, worse?

Still not right? Fret up one more to the seventh fret. How's that? Are the two strings coming together at this point?

If so, then you know you've tuned the G string too high since it is now in tune with the A on the fourth string's seventh fret. You need to relax the tension on the G string by several steps and start again.

If you feel you have not raised the string sufficiently to bring it to pitch, fret your fourth string at the fourth fret and compare. That's a G flat and you would not have raised the third string high enough. Right?

Maybe you have tuned your G string to the sound of the third fret of the fourth string. That's what note? That's an F natural. If those two notes sound similar when played together, you know you need to tweak your G string's tuning up a whole step.

Get the idea?

That's tuning by ear and it is the only real way I know to learn what in tune sounds like. Due to the way a guitar's fretboard is laid out, there are several unison points on the neck which are useful for further verification of proper pitch. You should learn these so you will gain the experience of knowing the fretbaord to begin with but also to inform your perceptions of when you are playing in tune with your other strings.

You are listening for the same note from both strings. As you begin to come close to proper tension on the string you are tuning you will begin to hear the slight wavering sound of two notes that are not quite identical. When you no longer hear that wavering, you have come as close as your ears allow at this time to being in tune.

Use your electronic tuner to hear this occur. Tune two strings to proper pitch and then take one slightly out of tune according to the tuner's read out. Down is always better than up for this experiment.

Now listen for that wavering sound when you play both strings together. That wavering is what you need to eliminate. Practice this just as you would practice playing a song. You need to be able to hear this on the fly while you are playing. If you've ever seen a performer tweak their tuner for one string in the middle of a song, they are hearing that wavering sound and they know they need to adjust tuning.

If you are playing chords, you must know when you are achieving good tone. Any chord will have at least three notes in its construction - what is termed a "triad". "Power chords" are the exception to this rule but they are the exception to many rules IMO so we'll ignore power chords for the time being.

If you strum, say, a G Major chord, you are likely playing all six strings with several duplicates and octaves of notes existing in that chord shape. Learning when all your strings are playing in tune with each other and when you are fretting each string correctly is an important part of your learning process. It takes time for some players to "get" this but it is one of the small things you won't learn from a book.

Practice just tuning your guitar so you develop your ears. It's important.

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6string    81

I'd say the white part of the chart is upside down. If your trying to tune your D-string to a G no wonder it breaking.

I think someone owes you some strings.

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frost    1

I'd say the white part of the chart is upside down. If your trying to tune your D-string to a G no wonder it breaking.

I think someone owes you some strings.

so I would tune d for e,g for a,c for d ,f for g, a for b ,d for e ? I hope you don't think I'm a complete dullard.

thank you for your time.peace

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frost    1

I think it should look like this

ok is the top string the 6th string tuned in e,second string the 5th tuned in a and so on?usualy I'm a quick study but I'm felling like a guitard

thank you for your time. peacepost-135622-0-27660400-1472780735_thumb.gif

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