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JessThrasher

Anyone use angled cables?

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I just got one a few days ago because it's more convenient when I play sitting on a couch or on the edge of my bed as most of my guitars have the jack on the side as opposed to the top like a Strat or SG. I also play in classical position (left leg) so it keeps the cable out of the way. With the angled ones, if you are prone to stepping on your cables, as I am, they don't get pulled out.

Sound wise, I don't notice a difference so it's really all down to personal preference.

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Jess,

I also play in the classical position and the cable plug does get in the way, but I still use the the straight ones. The angled plug does work on my Fender Jag though because it allows freedom of the trem bar.

Mike

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Not much in it except for practicality as you describe.

Connectors just like cables have a capacitance which affects passive pickup tone:

http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=1116847

Capacitance affects passive pickup tone with a low pass filtering effect and shift of resonant frequency peak:

http://www.shootoutguitarcables.com/guitar-cables-explained/capacitance-resonant-frequency.html

Right angle jacks if anything have a lower capacitance which is good, especially for patch cables between pedals as there can be many.

I would say therefore that the main consideration would be that in some applications there is a difference between a cable pulling out of a piece of equipment with straight jack plugs, or because of the angle of the R/A jacks the chance of a cable break or some piece of equipment being pulled over (small tube amp head for example) with an accidental yank. So for connecting in to an amp in general I would always use a straight jack plug hoping it would pull out rather than break the cable or worse damage a small amp head or combo on a riser etc. by pulling it over.

Well done for the classical position by the way, that's best for your back posture and best access to the whole neck.

Cheers,

Marc.

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I have always used right angled plugs on my amps since they have the jack on top of the amp.

That way the cable doesn't look like a weed growing out of the top of my amp.

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Not much in it except for practicality as you describe.

Connectors just like cables have a capacitance which affects passive pickup tone:

http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=1116847

Capacitance affects passive pickup tone with a low pass filtering effect and shift of resonant frequency peak:

http://www.shootoutguitarcables.com/guitar-cables-explained/capacitance-resonant-frequency.html

Right angle jacks if anything have a lower capacitance which is good, especially for patch cables between pedals as there can be many.

I would say therefore that the main consideration would be that in some applications there is a difference between a cable pulling out of a piece of equipment with straight jack plugs, or because of the angle of the R/A jacks the chance of a cable break or some piece of equipment being pulled over (small tube amp head for example) with an accidental yank. So for connecting in to an amp in general I would always use a straight jack plug hoping it would pull out rather than break the cable or worse damage a small amp head or combo on a riser etc. by pulling it over.

Well done for the classical position by the way, that's best for your back posture and best access to the whole neck.

Cheers,

Marc.

Good call on the amp thing. I've heard enough stories about amp heads being pulled over or whatnot. The only thing with right angles on the guitar side is that if you have a top mounted jack like an SG, you step on the cable hard enough and you could do some serious damage. But then again, that would happen with a straight cable too. Stepping on cables is not a good thing for many reasons other than a bit of embarrassment on stage.

All my pedalboard's patch cables are angled, mainly to save space.

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That is a good suggestion, along with taping down long cables on stage.

I have also created a system for myself which makes it hard to forget to do that with the cable.

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