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Fingers    0

I would like to ask a question about the F chord in the 21st bar of the "Unchained Melody" lesson. I have the Guitar Slide Rule and I slid the "F" up to the Major Triads window on the slide rule, and was expecting to find the notes that are in the 21st bar of the tune revealed on the slide rule fretboard, but some are not there as follows

  • 5th string 5th fret d note
  • 1st string open e note
  • 2nd string 3rd fret d note

The e and d notes are not related to the F chord so whats going on?

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6string    81

Hi Fingers,

not every note in the bar has to be a chord tone of the F chord.

notice the 1st bar which is a C chord, it has a d-note in it which is not in the C major chord, ( C, E & G)

but notice the e and d that are in the 21st bar are in the C scale (but don't have to be) and the song is in the key of C.

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mset3    158

Newcomer,

The E and D notes are both related to the F Chord, but they are not part of the F triad (F-A-C). The E note is the seventh note of the F scale. If you add this note to the F triad you will have F-A-C-E or an Fmajor7th (Fmaj7) chord. The D note is the sixth note of the F scale. Adding this note to the F triad you will have F-A-C-D or an Fmajor6th (F6) chord. Both of these chords are part of the F chord family and can substitute for an F major chord.

Mike

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Andrevn    3

Hi Navkrish,

You are not going to get a very easy answer. What Kirk is saying is you should read his section from the homepage where the whole logic of music, notes and chords are explained. Ive been playing for forty years, and went back and read this section again, and even learnt some new stuff.

But in short:

As you know, the strings are E, A ,D , G , B ,E in normal tuning. Those are the names of the notes you hear when that string is played in the open position.

 You should also know that, if you press on any fret, the note on that string changes. The newly formed note will be higher than the open note, and you goes higher according to alphabet. 

So, yor question on Em. If you press the second fret on the A string, the note becomes B. (after A follows B right?) Pressing on the D string, second fret creates and E.

Your strings are now, from bass note downwards, E, B, E, G, B, E. What Kirk said is, that "formula" is an Em formula. So yes, on the open position, there is no other position, thats it.

But there are very many other options going further, but that is why you are here, read the notes, learn the lessons.

Hope that helped.

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Fingers    0
On 12/21/2015 at 2:19 AM, mset3 said:

Newcomer,

The E and D notes are both related to the F Chord, but they are not part of the F triad (F-A-C). The E note is the seventh note of the F scale. If you add this note to the F triad you will have F-A-C-E or an Fmajor7th (Fmaj7) chord. The D note is the sixth note of the F scale. Adding this note to the F triad you will have F-A-C-D or an Fmajor6th (F6) chord. Both of these chords are part of the F chord family and can substitute for an F major chord.

Mike

Thanks Mike.

I notice that adding an extra note to a major triad changes the chord tone and thus the flavor of the chord.

Would it be true to say that all maj7 chords have a similar sound and belong to a Major 7th family, so to speak. E.G. Playing  a (G) chord open position compared to a (G7) open. I would say most of us could recognize which was the 7th chord, and which was the major with eyes closed, just from the sound.

But here is the intriguing thing for me, if you play the open G7 by adding the 7th note using the F note found on the 1st string 1st fret, compared to the version of G7 that uses the F note found on the 4th string 3rd fret. Comparing the sound of these two forms of (G7) reveals that they sound very different but are also similar. I could still recognize which was G7 and which was G major with eyes closed, just by hearing the flavor off a major 7th chord. I ask does one just get used to to the sound of a G7, and become brain washed by familiarity or is there an intrinsic quality one becomes aware.

Vic

 

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mset3    158
5 hours ago, Fingers said:

Thanks Mike.

I notice that adding an extra note to a major triad changes the chord tone and thus the flavor of the chord.

Would it be true to say that all maj7 chords have a similar sound and belong to a Major 7th family, so to speak. E.G. Playing  a (G) chord open position compared to a (G7) open. I would say most of us could recognize which was the 7th chord, and which was the major with eyes closed, just from the sound.

But here is the intriguing thing for me, if you play the open G7 by adding the 7th note using the F note found on the 1st string 1st fret, compared to the version of G7 that uses the F note found on the 4th string 3rd fret. Comparing the sound of these two forms of (G7) reveals that they sound very different but are also similar. I could still recognize which was G7 and which was G major with eyes closed, just by hearing the flavor off a major 7th chord. I ask does one just get used to to the sound of a G7, and become brain washed by familiarity or is there an intrinsic quality one becomes aware.

Vic

 

Vic,

After a while your ear will be able to differentiate between a Major, Dominant or a Minor chord. There are several ways to play a dominant 7th chord. Take your G7 example at the third fret. Lift off the little finger on the F note and you will still have a G7th. Now lift off the third finger off of the D note fifth fret and you will have another G7th chord.

G7

3

6

4

3

5

3

G7

3

3

4

3

5

3

G7

X

3

4

3

X

3

As long as the G7 chord is made of a G-B-D-F (1-3-5-b7) you will have a G7 chord. Keep in mind some chords double up on the notes.

Mike

 

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