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Couchiching - A Gordon Lightfoot Cover

gordon lightfoot

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#1 OFFLINE   Lcjones

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 11:07 AM

Another Lightfoot gem.

Couchiching





Enjoy

**
LC

Respect The Music
I'll saddle up my pony so I wont be so lonely, at least I know his heart is true


#2 OFFLINE   johnnydoxx

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 08:21 PM

More good stuff LC!

#3 ONLINE   mset3

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 10:53 AM

Les,

You do a great job on Gordon Lightfoot covers.

Mike

#4 OFFLINE   Doug

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 06:10 PM

Nice one, Les. I grew up in Orillia, Ontario, - Gordon Lightfoot's home town. In fact my uncle went to high school with him. Did a lot of fishing in Lake Couchiching.

-Doug
"we don't see things as they are, we see things as we are" - Anais Nin

#5 OFFLINE   Lcjones

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 08:11 AM

THanks folks ...

Doug, that is way cool! One of these days I'll get back up that way.

Respect The Music
I'll saddle up my pony so I wont be so lonely, at least I know his heart is true


#6 OFFLINE   carol m

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 08:40 AM

I haven't heard that song before, or of Couchiching either. Is it a native people's name? - and Doug, what's the accepted way to refer to native americans in Canada - I suppose technically they are native americans too, if you use the original Americas name for the whole continent. Oops off topic again....

Great song Les - is this latest burst of recording your back catalogue, or are you in one of your a creative phases? :)
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

#7 OFFLINE   Doug

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 12:29 PM

Hi Carol, (and apologies to Les for continuing off-topic).
I think that the general term is First Nations but that does not include Inuit or Metis. Inuit are the aboriginal people of the arctic and I am not really sure why they are treated as a separate body in the government's eyes except that it is likely historical - Eskimos and Indians (using the old terms) were traditional enemies. The Metis were offspring of unions between Europeans (generally french fur-traders) and First Nations. They were accepted by neither group and formed their own distinct culture.

There are many place names in Canada that derive from the original First Nations words, starting with Canada itself. In the case of Couchiching, I think it is most likely a Huron word. In Ontario, the major first nations tribes are: Algonquin, Huron, and Mohawk in the south and Cree in the north. During the time that the fur trade was opening up Canada, the Algonquins were the most powerful nation. They aligned with the french. The British traders were allied with the Iroquois nation which included the Mohawks (along with four other tribes further to the south that share a common language). The Iroquois were traditional enemies of teh Algonquins and both tribes would occasionally foray into the other's territory to conduct raids. The Hurons of western Ontario interestingly were allied to the Algonquins and were enemies of the Mohawks even though the Huron language is shared with the Iroquois and very distinct from Algonquin.

By the way, one of the major explorers of Canada was Samuel de Champlain from France. There is a very large bronze statue of Samuel de Champlain in a park in Orillia on the shores of Lake Couchiching.

http://www.flickr.co...era/1074367734/

Oops - I just googled. I was wrong, Couchiching is an Ojibwe word. And on further reading, Ojibwe is an off shoot of the Algonquin language.
It's all so complicated ;).

-Doug
"we don't see things as they are, we see things as we are" - Anais Nin

#8 OFFLINE   carol m

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 09:33 PM

Isn't life interesting! Thanks for the info Doug. I loved the Orillia 'Beach' - nice touch. Do the First Nations have their own decent sized areas of land and traditional law? How about language? Does anyone preserve the old languages? I know there's been a push to re-awaken the original languages in the Lakote Sioux, amongst others (not sure of the spelling and inbuilt spell check is stumped too.

Now I'm wondering if the game of Lacrosse comes from the Lakota Sioux? Off topic with a vengeance - hope you don't mind Les.
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

#9 OFFLINE   Doug

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 05:58 PM

Hi Carol,
I am not very knowledgeable about native affairs except to say that Canada has a very bad record of how we have treated the first nations. There are many reserves (US calls them reservations) where the first nations people can try to carry on traditional life but there are hundreds of land claims disputes that have been in the courts for years without any progress being made. There are some reserves that do alright economically generally due to natural resource wealth or casinos and such. But there are others where the quality of life is appalling.

http://www.thedailyp...44&archive=true

Canada instituted a residential school system where the first nation's children were forced by law to leave their parents and go to schools run generally by churches. Children in these schools were often not allowed to use their mother tongue. A lot of the first nations traditional culture was lost. The residential school system was closed down (I think in the 70's) and Canada has apologized officially for the harm that they caused.

Although there are many problems that need to be addressed (gasoline sniffing, drug abuse, teenage suicides, unemployment), I feel that things are improving. The fact that the first nations population growth is the fastest of all segments of the Canadian population will mean that they will gain political power - especially in Manitoba and Saskatchewan (the central provinces of Canada). I have the feeling that there is a resurgence of pride and that there are now role models for young people. And I think that racist views are on the decline.

Well, one can hope anyway.

-Doug
"we don't see things as they are, we see things as we are" - Anais Nin

#10 OFFLINE   Lcjones

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 07:26 PM

off topic is cool.... :)

Good stuff Doug.

Respect The Music
I'll saddle up my pony so I wont be so lonely, at least I know his heart is true


#11 OFFLINE   carol m

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 03:30 AM

Yes interesting Doug. It sounds similar to here. The Australian Govt used to kidnap children from aboriginal communities (for their own good, of course) and put them in church based homes (Missions) where there was a lot of exploitation, and also abuse - physical, psychological and sexual. They really did steal them - when the trucks arrived at a bush camp, the kids would run off into the bush to hide, but many were caught. After these 'schools' they were mostly shipped out to work as domestic workers and farm hands on farms and outback stations - for hard labour and very little pay - slaves more or less. They were often so 'crushed' by their experiences that they could not find their way out into decent employment, although some of them have gone on to be leaders in their communities and spokes people for their civil rights. In 1965, an aboriginal, Charles Perkins, got together people to go on a Freedom Ride through small town, outback Australia to try to change the descrimination, modeled on the Freedom Rides of the southern USA States. The bus was run off the road at one point.

These days those stolen kids have given themselves a name, The Stolen Generation. Some of these children were never able to trace their real families again, although some have. Australia had a legal and official White Australia Policy until relatively recently 1901 - 1973 before it was totally dismantled. There is still a lot of racism in Australia, although that is always strongly denied. The aborigines here have the same problems that most displaced indigenous people do: alcohol, petrol sniffing, unemployment, lack of education, low life expectancy, higher infant mortality rates, etc and also violence - mostly alcohol related. I'm not sure that it is getting better.
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

#12 OFFLINE   carol m

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 03:38 AM

Lacrosse (wikipedia) is a team sport of Native American origin played using a small rubber ball and a long-handled stick called a crosse or lacrosse stick, mainly played in the United States and Canada. It is a contact sport which requires padding. The head of the lacrosse stick is strung with loose mesh designed to catch and hold the lacrosse ball.

Offensively, the objective of the game is to score by shooting the ball into an opponent's goal, using the lacrosse stick to catch, carry, and pass the ball to do so.

Defensively, the objective is to keep the opposing team from scoring and to dispossess them of the ball through the use of stick checking and body contact or positioning. The sport has four major types: men's field lacrosse, women's lacrosse, box lacrosse and intercrosse.....woah, I stopped reading right there! :o
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

#13 OFFLINE   Doug

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 01:14 PM

Hi Carol.
Lacrosse was very popular when I was growing up in Orillia and had been for years with organized teams. Not sure if it still is. My Dad was a goalie when he was a kid and used to like telling us that the only time his team lost was when he was knocked cold by the ball which is a very hard india rubber ball.

I've heard of field lacrosse but the type I know is played in an court similar in style and size to ice hockey rinks except it is played on cement instead of ice. It is pretty similar in style to hockey except there is an extra player called a rover and I think (but not sure) that there may be different rules for off-side etc. It's a pretty wild game to watch with lots of whacking the other player with the stick - which I guess is legal - at least it wasn't called. And the scores tend to be higher than hockey. (Although the game between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh last night had 14 goals - crazy.)

We were taught in school that one of the indian tribes attacked a french settlement back in the 1700's in Ontario by approaching the settlement playing lacrosse. Once they were allowed to get close enough they then threw down their sticks and out came more lethal weapons. Or maybe they just used the sticks - I dunno.

The sticks used to be made out of ash wood steam bent in a sort of hoop with raw hide leather strapping woven in for a pouch. We used to store our sticks with a rock in the pouch to keep a nice pocket in the leather pouch. Good players can fling the ball really hard and fast and can catch really fast passes as well. There's built in incentive for learning to catch because (as I said) that ball is _really_ hard. They can also pick up a ball by rolling the stick over the ball - they make it look easy but...

I was looking at lacrosse sticks the other day at a sports store - but now they're made of metal and the webbing is nylon. Not the same at all.

-Doug

"we don't see things as they are, we see things as we are" - Anais Nin

#14 OFFLINE   carol m

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:51 AM

Great video Doug - wiki said the game was sometimes played by private school girls in England.....I was briefly sent to a College for Young Ladies (don't ask!) where we were expected to play field lacrosse - no padding, no mouth guard, no helmet - it was obviously a lethal sport and I hated it. Some of the 'young ladies' were anything but, and saw it as an opportunity to inflict assault, legally. The teacher who taught us was one of those 'jolly hockey sticks' types - do you know about them in Canada - who was some sort of Representative player in England - and she didn't mess about!

"Good players can fling the ball really hard and fast and can catch really fast passes as well. There's built in incentive for learning to catch because (as I said) that ball is _really_ hard". Exactly! It's no game for wooses - do you have wooses in Canada?


I escaped without injury - the Lacrosse, and the school - they decided that I 'wasn't suitable' and I was 'asked to leave' (one of my proudest achievements) and I couldn't have agreed more - that was about the only thing we did agree on.

For example, when the sun came out (~70C max) but often less, it was a rule that we absolutely had to wear straw hats at lunchtime so we didn't get heat stroke...ridiculous!...this was just one of the things that I thought was really stupid....you can imagine the rest. It was not pretty.

When someone in a maths class (I use the term loosely) smelt gas coming from the heater, the teacher investigated it by lighting a match and advancing towards the heater - while we all sat there, trying to decide if we should run or not! She lost her eyebrows in the explosion. That's how smart the teachers were, you can imagine the quality of 'education' we got.

Girls from that school in my class (an all girls school), all went on to be secretaries (at best), hairdressers, and/or housewives - they didn't get a good enough education to be qualified for anything else. I'm glad I escaped before i shared their fate.

When I started at my next school (local co-ed), I never had any discipline problems (because the staff there, were not stupid) and went on to be a Prefect and House Captain etc - I even passed a few exams. The move was a good move for everyone, and saved my parents from a stack of school fees as well.

So watching your video brought it all back..... :)
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

#15 OFFLINE   eddiez152

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 10:34 AM

Good tune LC
Nothin sweeter than the sound of music comin out of a 6 string box - EZ me Music / ASCAP "Music is a social act of communication, a gesture of friendship,the strongest there is"-Malcolm Arnold

#16 OFFLINE   Doug

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 04:51 PM

Hi Carol,
I got a kick out of your memories of lacrosse and school. I'm sure you were a force to be reckoned with ;-).

I enjoyed the youtube video as well 'cause my Dad used to take us to see Lacrosse games when we were kids. Brought back memories for me too.
-Doug
"we don't see things as they are, we see things as we are" - Anais Nin

#17 OFFLINE   carol m

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 11:52 PM

Yes, I can laugh about it now, but it was really quite a difficult time for me - I did try to fit in, but I just couldn't respect any of the teachers - I didn't do anything 'wrong' as I saw it, but I couldn't accept being ruled by idiots, and the requirement to obey rules that didn't make any sense.

And..... when I tried to defend myself by logically arguing my case, they didn't appreciate it at all! Instead of listening and appreciating the merits of my arguments, they regarded me as some sort of......well, I don't actually know, but they did make it very clear to me that the potential value of my insights into their school was definitely not appreciated. How ungrateful was that?? I was 13 at the time, and never lost my composure in our discussions - I remained rational and logical at all times.....unlike them. :laughingg:
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley





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