paulg1630

learn your fretboard

26 posts in this topic

Paul,

Just my opinion, but items like this are a crutch. There are other better ways to learn the notes on the fretboard.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paul,

Just my opinion, but items like this are a crutch. There are other better ways to learn the notes on the fretboard.

Mike

care to elaborate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The little sticky notes will tell you where the notes are on a guitar and is a great way for identifying the notes. However, I believe it makes it too easy to become dependent on using this. Remove the sticky notes and you will be right back where you started. Learning the notes is not all that difficult, if done in a systematic way. One of the best resources I've found for thoroughly learning the fretboard is a book written by Barrett Tagliarino titled Guitar Fretboard Workbook. Here is an Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Fretboard-Workbook-Barrett-Tagliarino/dp/0634049011

Again, this is just my opinion. If you feel this will help you, by all means go for it.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi mset3,

Can you give a brief explanation of the method used in that book? Is it simple yet effective for a beginner?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi mset3,

Can you give a brief explanation of the method used in that book? Is it simple yet effective for a beginner?

+1

Easy for someone to claim one thing, when there is no way to compare it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read about this book "the bead method of fretboard mastery revised" and it's suppose to be really good. It's hard to find though, if you can find a place to buy it please let me know. Though I prefer a real copy I found and downloaded a pdf of it until I can find it for sale somewhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read about this book "the bead method of fretboard mastery revised" and it's suppose to be really good. It's hard to find though, if you can find a place to buy it please let me know. Though I prefer a real copy I found and downloaded a pdf of it until I can find it for sale somewhere.

Is this it DV8R?, looks interesting.

http://www.amazon.com/The-BEAD-Method-Fretboard-Mastery/dp/1411657896

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sweet!! That page was missing earlier today when I looked there. Glad it is back up and I can order it! Thanks!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i already have the guitar fretboard workbook bought it on amazon just havent worked through it yet.fretboard roadmaps is another good book plenty of good guitar books on amazon.the fretboard workbook covers scales chords and arpeggios how to form them but fretboard roadmaps is similar.they help u understand the fretboard not how to remember the notes so why not have both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I looked at that earlier and it is a bit one dimensional

Kirk's Plane Talk Material teaches that as a minor part of the whole

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read the BEAD Method of Fretboard Mastery yesterday evening. Both books take a similar path in their explanation covering scales, chords, arpeggios, modes, etc. Since I am more familiar with the CAGED system, Barrett Tagliarino's book made more sense to me. The BEAD Method incorporates several of its own forms, however Dietz does mention the CAGED system in his book. If you are looking for a quick and easy way to identify the notes on the fretboard and how they relate to the Circle of Fifths, the initial chapters of the BEAD Method will serve you well.

I also agree with althumbs, PlaneTalk will allow you to see the fretboard as a whole and put it all together for you.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PlaneTalk is well worth the money. It will give you a new perspective in expanding your guitar knowledge.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, DV8R, I'm Kirk, the author of PlaneTalk.

I don't know much about the other books you mention, nothing in fact, but I know everything about PlaneTalk. It teaches a mindset, more than anything else, a way of thinking about music and a way of 'seeing' the fretboard as a unit. Yes, you will learn about barre chords, but that's just a tiny aspect of the full lesson. I'm not sure what stage you are at, but I wrote it more for those who have reached a level of competency and are now stuck there. The way music imposes itself on a guitar fretboard has to be one of the most confusing puzzles of all ... PlaneTalk will show you a very simple way of tracking it all. With tons of practice, of course. What it doesn't get into is specific techniques like strumming, bending, hammer ons, etc., it's strictly a fretboard navigation and mindset lesson.

If you have any more questions, ask away, but read the testimonials. They say a lot about the lesson.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well ive got some of these stickers on my guitar.Not sure how long it will take me to ingrain the notes into my memory but ive already found myself playing all over the fretboard and have created some interesting sounds with them on surely that cant be bad even if i am cheating i can sound like jimi hendrix now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well ive got some of these stickers on my guitar.Not sure how long it will take me to ingrain the notes into my memory but ive already found myself playing all over the fretboard and have created some interesting sounds with them on surely that cant be bad even if i am cheating i can sound like jimi hendrix now

If you're having fun and making good sounds, then, no, it can't be bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It teaches you the underpinning of how notes on a guitar works

learning the notes is just a side effect of studying the material

Not only knowing all the notes but their context in chords is one of it's strengths. After plane talk you don't need chord books You can just work out the chords on your own on the neck anywhere in any inversion.. You can look at an A for instance and know what interval it is and how it fits into a chord you want to play whether it be a sus2 or a minor 9th etc.

There is a place on this forum where you can read testimonials about this. last music book you would ever have to buy and it has it's own forum,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read the BEAD Method of Fretboard Mastery yesterday evening. Both books take a similar path in their explanation covering scales, chords, arpeggios, modes, etc. Since I am more familiar with the CAGED system, Barrett Tagliarino's book made more sense to me. The BEAD Method incorporates several of its own forms, however Dietz does mention the CAGED system in his book. If you are looking for a quick and easy way to identify the notes on the fretboard and how they relate to the Circle of Fifths, the initial chapters of the BEAD Method will serve you well.

I also agree with althumbs, PlaneTalk will allow you to see the fretboard as a whole and put it all together for you.

Mike

Would you recommend both courses? Do they work with each other? I got the BEAD method but am still considering PlaneTalk. Would you say one or the other or both at once are useful? I need a response asap so anyone feel free to respond! Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.