Jump to content
OldManGuitarNewbie

Setting up AE guitar with amp and mic?

Recommended Posts

Not sure how to research this, but figured I'd start here for some good advice.

I play an AE ukulele and a 6 string and 12 string AE guitar. I want to start "performing" (that's a stretch at my talent level!) with others who use AE guitars, mics and amps. I just bought an "acoustic guitar amp" and microphone. I will be playing with the others this summer. We will do basically folk, folk rock, and some Hawaiian song. My amp is an Ibanez Troubador 35w amp, with a Shure mic (model PG58) with tripod/boom setup. Bought used. I have both guitar pickup and mic plugged this into the amp and it sounds okay to me...just scary to hear myself!wink.gif

I'm asking for some guidance and general principals I need to keep in mind. For instance, my amp has the usual controlls for treble, midrange and bass, and something called "chorus" and another called "reverb". I have fiddled around with the reverb and maginally understand that now, but I'm clueless about the "chorus", and how to use either when I play/sing. I'm also not sure where to set the volumes...there is a "master volume" and then the mic and guitar (on the amp) both have their own control. I figure on the guitar/uke I set the volume at the mid-point for volume, treble and bass to start. But where do I set those controls on the amp?

Anyone know a good, basic link to how to set up the amp, mic, etc? How to place them, how to use chorus and reverb, etc? When I play now, for myself, practicing, I have the amp placed about 4 feet on my side, pointed at me (due to the limits of my room), and I get feedback occasionally...especially when the bass it turned up a bit. I'm not worried about that feedback as I know when I angle the amp away from me that will go away.

Suggestions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

I am in the same boat you are so I will follow this thread closely.

That, however, won't stop me from telling you what I do just to confuse you a bit more.

I have a Crate 30W acoustic amp, a Shure SM57 dynamic mic and a Audio Technica condensor mic.

I have an Alesis interface so I can use the condensor mic.

I do most of my recording using the condensor mic directly in to Alesis/Audacity.

I use Audacity to record to and modify the tracks.

WARNING: Do Not Try This At Home============= That is just my way of saying I have no clue, I am just learning.

However..........I now use the condensor mic all the time. It is more sensitive and I get a better sound.

I am beginning to use my amp now to record from. My amp is on the floor of course and the mic is on a 12" stand in front of the amp and about 24 inches away from the amp. All of that is about 6 feet from me and pointed away.

On my amp I set the tone usually at midpoint and then adjust my guitar's pre-amp. If I want more adjustment I then tweek the controls on the amp. If, after recording I still want to adjust the sound, I do that in Audacity.

"Chorus" simulates the sound of many instruments at once, like a violin group. They are all not exactly in tune with each other but when heard together it sounds like a single source and gives the note a sort of "shimmering" quality. I know, that didn't help much.

It is like listening to one person singing one note and then listening to 12 people singing the same note.

Feel free to rip this page off your monitor screen and toss it far far away. I am trying to learn and the only way for me is to experiment and change things until it seems to work. Most of the info out there seems to be for the experts and is way too technical (and expensive) for me. :yes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

I am in the same boat you are so I will follow this thread closely.

That, however, won't stop me from telling you what I do just to confuse you a bit more.

I have a Crate 30W acoustic amp, a Shure SM57 dynamic mic and a Audio Technica condensor mic.

I have an Alesis interface so I can use the condensor mic.

I do most of my recording using the condensor mic directly in to Alesis/Audacity.

I use Audacity to record to and modify the tracks.

WARNING: Do Not Try This At Home============= That is just my way of saying I have no clue, I am just learning.

However..........I now use the condensor mic all the time. It is more sensitive and I get a better sound.

I am beginning to use my amp now to record from. My amp is on the floor of course and the mic is on a 12" stand in front of the amp and about 24 inches away from the amp. All of that is about 6 feet from me and pointed away.

On my amp I set the tone usually at midpoint and then adjust my guitar's pre-amp. If I want more adjustment I then tweek the controls on the amp. If, after recording I still want to adjust the sound, I do that in Audacity.

"Chorus" simulates the sound of many instruments at once, like a violin group. They are all not exactly in tune with each other but when heard together it sounds like a single source and gives the note a sort of "shimmering" quality. I know, that didn't help much.

It is like listening to one person singing one note and then listening to 12 people singing the same note.

Feel free to rip this page off your monitor screen and toss it far far away. I am trying to learn and the only way for me is to experiment and change things until it seems to work. Most of the info out there seems to be for the experts and is way too technical (and expensive) for me. :yes:

No, not, this was a VERY useful reply! That's the sort of thing I wanted. I don't plan on recording, but the info on the condenser mic and all will be useful. Also your suggestion on the amp settings, especially those for the chorus. That's a new one on me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×