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Sorry but just a few more questions...


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#1 OFFLINE   psx119

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 02:50 PM

1) I was reading up on "accidentals" and the definition was "a musical notation that makes a note sharp or flat or natural." If this is true then doesn't that make every note accidental? I say this because a note can either be sharp, flat or natural and those are it's only options so if this is true then technically every note MUST be accidental. but that can't be true. I'm pretty confused about this one

2) is a diatonic scale basically a scale that's only played using natural notes without sharps and flats? and is a chromatic scale a scale that plays every single note (including sharps and flats) in ascending order?

3) when playing chords I know there's multiple ways to play them. like for instance, the B minor chord can be played in different positions but some of them involve strumming all the strings and some involve only strumming certain strings and as a result B minor chords can sound different. what I want to know is, Is there a real or main version of each of the chords?


#2 OFFLINE   eddiez152

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 04:36 PM

(1)The accidental note: is a note that is played out of the given scale of the music.
Example: Lets say that the staff calls for 4 flats begin played throughout the entire piece. Lets use the(Ab in the major scale) Ab-Bb-Db-Eb
Now lets focus on (Bb)note. Now in a certain place in the music score for what ever reason that Bb needs to be played neutral, they use an accidental sign showing that in this spot we don't want to follow the original score so they need to show that on the sheet.
If I'm wrong, someone hang me by my finger tips.
(2) Yes you are correct.
(3) I understand what your asking, but not sure how to answer this in the best way. The constant in all positions is the Root which in your question is the -B- AND ITS A MINOR It requires 2 more strings to complete the chord. In this case the minor 3rd (D) and the perfect 5th (F#)

HERE ARE 3 POSITIONS ON THE NECK FOR THE Bm Chord

(1) 2ND FRET (1st position) X-B-F#-B-D-F# (X) IS NOT PLAYED CAUSE YOU AINT GOT FINGERS LONG ENOUGH TO GET TO ANY USEABLE NOTE
(2) 7TH FRET (2nd position) B-F#-B-D-F#-B HERE YOU STUCK WITH A BAR CHORD notice the B and B
(3) 9TH FRET (3rd position) X-X-B-F#-B-D (X) IS NOT PLAYED CAUSE YOU AINT GOT FINGERS LONG ENOUGH TO GET TO ANY USEABLE NOTE

Useable note B-D-F#

BOY I HOPE I DID THIS RIGHT :yes:
Nothin sweeter than the sound of music comin out of a 6 string box - EZ me Music / ASCAP "Music is a social act of communication, a gesture of friendship,the strongest there is"-Malcolm Arnold

#3 OFFLINE   karcey

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 05:50 PM

I think Eddie got that answered pretty well. Using different words for a different slant on it ... the key signature at the beginning of a piece of music sets the stautus of each of those notes throughout the piece. So the instruction you get from the key signature takes away the need for heaps of accidental signs throughout the piece.
If a note, which according to the key is to be played sharp, needs to be flattened (or flatted) then a natural sign is put on it to tell the player to ignore the key signature for that note and any other similar notes for the rest of that bar. Once you start a new bar then it's back to the normal key signature rules.
It's not possible to have a flat sharp note, that is a Dsharp can't be shown as a flat Dsharp. Instead you'd have a Dnatural. But it is possible to sharpen an already sharp note, e.g. D double sharp.
I'm offering my fingertips just like Eddie did if I've confused the issue.
"The music matters more than the instrument on which we play it." Jason W. Solomon

#4 OFFLINE   eddiez152

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 06:22 PM

Thanks for the support Karcey, sometimes you got to get out there without supervision. Usually i dont answer these types of questions. But you got to ride the bike eventually. :yes: OK now back to, heck I forgot.
Nothin sweeter than the sound of music comin out of a 6 string box - EZ me Music / ASCAP "Music is a social act of communication, a gesture of friendship,the strongest there is"-Malcolm Arnold

#5 OFFLINE   psx119

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 06:41 PM

okay so i definitely get the last 2 answers and i think i understand what your saying about accidentals. so just to be clear the key signature indicates where there is an accidental? also in your example (eddiez) when you said "in a certain place in the music score for what ever reason that Bb needs to be played neutral, they use an accidental sign showing that in this spot we don't want to follow the original score so they need to show that on the sheet." i get it but does that mean there will be a natural symbol next to it?

#6 OFFLINE   karcey

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 06:48 PM

That's what I love about this forum Eddie, no one person has to have all the information, and if everyone sticks in their two cents we usually get enough information to answer the questions.

I'm going to stick my neck out and make comment about his question 3. I wasn't going to, but as you say sometimes you have to try.
A chord, any chord, is made up of a number of notes. Any combination of those notes is that chord. If the notes aren't played together (like a piano where all the fingers go down at the same time) but are strummed, then the chord whould normally have the root note as the first note played.
Sometimes you play a chord backwards, an upstroke. But whether you strum a C down or up, it's still a C.

I'm puting my fingertips at risk again!
"The music matters more than the instrument on which we play it." Jason W. Solomon

#7 OFFLINE   psx119

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 07:07 PM

i get it. so what your saying is there is no main way to play a chord as long your playing the chord correctly it doesn't matter which finger formation you choose.

#8 OFFLINE   karcey

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 07:15 PM

Yes, but don't overlook Eddie's point, that while there are plenty of combinations of notes on the fretboard to make a particular chord, many of those combinations are unavailable because they're impossible to reach.
"The music matters more than the instrument on which we play it." Jason W. Solomon

#9 OFFLINE   psx119

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 07:33 PM

well in any case thank you both for being so helpful. I'm pretty sure I'll have more questions soon so joining this forum definitely helps big time

#10 OFFLINE   eddiez152

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 07:51 PM

psx,
You will find that chords laid out in the books and their finger positions are probably the best method of playing the cord. But even I dont play the G chord
like they show in the book. But that is because i have a problem my pinky finger. So as you mentioned, its the notes that count not the fingers.
Also at the top of the page check out Kirks _Chords_ you will find it in the Dark Blue header above.
Nothin sweeter than the sound of music comin out of a 6 string box - EZ me Music / ASCAP "Music is a social act of communication, a gesture of friendship,the strongest there is"-Malcolm Arnold

#11 ONLINE   6string

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 08:05 PM

If I play a peice and it sounds correct then every note I've played is accidental ;)
Deja Moo: The feeling that you’ve heard this bull before.





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