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JessThrasher

Recording with video camera?

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I'm trying to record a cover of a song right now with a video camera (video and audio at the same time). I don't have a separate recording rig so I don't expect the sound quality to be perfect. When I play (tuning is Dropped D by the way), it sounds perfectly fine through the amp but when I record it on the camera and upload it, the lower notes especially sound really muddy and bassy. In my previous videos it wasn't as bad, but it's a lot worse now. Is it just the limitations of the video camera (which I can understand), or is it the acoustics of the room (as I'm recording in a different room than I was before).

Any ideas other than direct line in recording because that's not an option right now.

I'm going for this type of sound quality. Can you tell if that was recorded through a direct line or just the camera microphone?

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If the recording sounds good on other devices and in live, than likely it is the mic on your camera. It is likely limited to a medium range of pitches as I wouldn't think they had designed it for recording music...if you have something else that can pick it up cleaner, try recording audio and video with separate devices...do so at same time even though you'd have to overlay the audio on top of the video so that way they would be in sync better...that's what I would do anyhow.

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Good idea Brian. It's worth a try anyway, and then, Jess, you might have to learn learn about how to synch audio and video and you can tell us how you did it. :)

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They are good questions, Jess. The recordings of your piano playing are pretty good - I assume it's using the same mic.

You can try a few things, like lower the volume of the amp and increase the treble (that would work if the low frequency audio is being overdriven). But your sugestion that it is the room could be correct. Studios spend a lot of time and money to ensure that the audio is nice and flat - especially with bass. They do this mainly by placing bass traps in the corners of the room.

Make sure the amp is not in the corner and also make sure the camera is not in a corner as well - bass tends to reflect and build up in the corners. You can try taking all the cushions off of your chesterfield (er, couch for non-canadians - when my kids were young they used to call them couch-terfields) and placing them in the corners of the room. Probably just adjusting the placement of the camera will help a lot. And make sure you're not overdriving the camera mic - try recording at a lower volume.

Good luck.

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Ah, the position of the camera. Now why didn't I think of that earlier?!

To give you an idea of where the camera is located, have a look at the picture I've attached. I know, it's an old picture of me but the spot where I'm standing is where the camera (mounted on a tripod) was placed during the recording. Do you think just moving everything to another room would be better?

post-15162-0-86297500-1306522137_thumb.jpg

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I see. First off, try opening the door - that should reduce the boominess of the room. I think the peaks and valleys of sound volume can be fairly narrow as you move in a room - so just moving the camera by a few feet may make a big difference.

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Do you think it could be the Dropped D tuning having any effect? Because I can't play the song in any other tuning. As for the settings on the amp, I already have the bass setting turned down and the treble turned up. It sounds very treble-y on the amp but when you record it with the camera and upload it on the computer, low notes sound very boomy.

Skip to 0:49 of the video and just listen to a few seconds (don't watch the rest because it sucks). That song was in standard E tuning and recorded in the TV room as opposed to my bedroom.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TdkA-cuxM8

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I just tried recording again with the door open and the camera moved a couple of feet away as well as some blankets and pillows stuffed into the corners of the room. It's not as boomy as before but still quite a bit bassy. You can hear it in the clip below.

Sound check.mp3

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Well, that one I found pretty low in volume. Sounds like you are discerning in the quality of sound you are after and so I think Brian is right - maybe you should invest in an audio recorder. With that you could tweak the sound to how you like it and then overlay it with the video. It will give you much more flexibility. But to tell the truth, the style of music you are playing doesn't need clean audio since so much of it is distortion in any case.

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If you have a mac (or a pc with a good sound card, but I've never heard a good one) you could just try the onboard camera and microphone - they have a pretty good sound for a computer. Maybe worth a try if you have access to one.

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I do not have a mac I could use and the sound card on my PC is ok I guess.

With the type of music I'm playing, distortion is actually good. It's just the excessive "boomy" bass sounds that I don't want.

Anyone have any experiance with the Q3 handheld recorder? I've been looking at one of those for a while and have been thinking about getting one. From what I hear, it's a video camera designed for recording musical instrument related videos.

Edit: I just found out that I can rent an HD Q3 recorder from the local music store for $20 a week. Will probably do that to try it out and decide whether I really want to buy one or not.

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I recorded this with my HD Kodak Playsport at NAMM last year in Los Angeles, CA. The sound on it is purdy good. The camera is really not that much at Best Buy. and for less than $200, you can't beat it with a stick. I've also recorded a Tea Party concert in Buffalo New York with it as well and it turned out really well. By the way, this camera is also waterproof!

NAMM:

( By the way, I made the guitar in this video)

Shonie

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Shonie,

That was some great shooting, and the best sound I have ever heard in a live take. Those kids are great. The lead is fantastic.

Thaks eddie!

To be honest, I really didn't put too much effort into shooting it. The main objective of shooting video or film is doing your best to keep your subject(s) in frame. Nothing more.\

These gentlemen and their families are really good friends of ours. The group is called Levi and the Plateros. A Navajo (Native American) Blues Group from New Mexico. Levi Platero is the lead guitarist and vocals. I have built 2 guitars (Navatone Guitars) for them and pretty much maintain all the guitars and basses they have. The guitar he is playing in the video is a guitar I built and was showcasing at NAMM last year in 2011 in Los Angeles, CA. It's my first relic job I have ever done. I have also done a few music videos for them and have shot a ton of live footage of them as well.

Shonie

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