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tishyrae

Washburn Oscar Schmidt OF2

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tishyrae    0

Hello All

I have been reading posts today and you all are a wealth of information! LOVE IT!

I am looking at buying an acoustic guitar one that would be ideal for finger playing style. I was thinking of going with the Washburn Oscar Schmidt OF2! Any suggestions either way?

Thanks

Trisha

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tishyrae    0

Any other suggestions about what type of guitar is best for a beginner who want to learn finger style playing? Any help would be greatly appreciated...who know picking a guitar would be so stressful! LOL

Thanks in advance.

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tinsmith    2

Hello All

I have been reading posts today and you all are a wealth of information! LOVE IT!

I am looking at buying an acoustic guitar one that would be ideal for finger playing style. I was thinking of going with the Washburn Oscar Schmidt OF2! Any suggestions either way?

Thanks

Trisha

Guitars are like guns.....

Go with the best you can afford, that you like, which sounds good to YOU.....

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carol m    64

If possible, it's a good idea if you can go to a store and ask the people there for some advice. They will show you some guitars in your price range and they will play them for you in any style you want if you ask them to. That way you can hear how each one sounds. It's also a good idea to hold them yourself and see how they feel for comfort.

Guitar body size is something that varies quite a lot. Mostly what's called a dreadnaught size is one of the biggest (and loudest) and generally thought to be best for strumming - I think. I personally have found that guitars not as big as that are easier to play and sound better to my ears. Another thing is that guitars have different width of finger board. Most are the same, but some are a bit thinner and some are a bit wider - I prefer it to be wider rather than narrower for finger picking when possible. But you will get used to whatever your guitar has, once you've been playing it for a while.

I chose my first proper guitar by running a thumb across every guitar in the store in my price range (maybe 40), trying to pick out a couple with a tone I liked best. Then I got someone to demo them for me, then I had 2 left to choose from - then I went for the one I liked the look of best, even though it was a bit more expensive than the other one. I still love that guitar.

Good luck, and let us know how you go.

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karcey    42

G'day Trisha, welcome to our community.

Your question has been asked thousands of times, and will be asked thousands of times more. Each of us here has experienced something which we feel is important to a guitar purchasing decision. Sometimes we agree, but not always. Carol has good advice her answer this time is spot on too. But let me give you another angle.

This will only be your first guitar, and there's no medal for staying with one for your whole playing career. So it doesn't have to be the best or most expensive in the shop. But it does have to be better than junk. It must be able to put out good sounds. If the man in the shop can play it nicely, then you'll be able to one day as well.

Your ears aren't the most reliable at this stage. Don't struggle with trying to hear the fine differences in sound; broad brush is OK for now. It'll take you a long time before you can play better than your first guitar.

Don't buy a guitar that has to be kept in a case; you need it on a stand or hanger so you can grab it as soon as the urge takes you. Out of sight is out of mind. If you have kids or dogs around, then be a bit conservative with the amount of cash you invest. (It will get a ding or two as time goes on, you know!)

If you find something second hand, and it feels and sounds OK and it's cheap, then buy it. Nobody is a better player for learning on expensive equipment. Your aim right now is to get lots of learning, not to spend lots of money.

Don't overlook nylon string guitars. They have wider necks (generally) but are much easier on the fingers. The sound is more mellow, but the fingering is exactly the same so it's easy to switch between nylon and steel as the mood takes you.

Lessons from a good teacher are an unquestionable benefit. If you choose to take lessons, your teacher may be able to give you some advice about the type of guitar which will serve you best.

Keep in touch.

P.S. If you really like that Washburn you mentioned in your post, then it's probably as good as any other to start on.

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tishyrae    0

Thank you everyone for your response! :) I am a mom of 4 kids so I know my first guitar will probably be used. I have my eye on a Yamaha FG700s I found on Craigslist. A guitar teacher is selling it and I know it has been well taken care of. I have read a lot of reviews and it seems to be a good little guitar. Planning on going to look at it today...hoping it has a nice sound too. Researched on youtube sounds good to me! :)

Thank you so much for being so supportive and kind. :)

Trisha

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tishyrae    0

Hi All

I went with the Yamaha FG700s and have started to learn some chords...starting with finger placements only really...tried to tune a string I thought sounded off and it broke...now what? I know I should replace them all...I have no idea which gauge to buy or kind really...any suggestions would be appreciated!

THANKS IN ADVANCE!

Trisha

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karcey    42

..tried to tune a string I thought sounded off and it broke...now what? I know I should replace them all...I have no idea which gauge to buy or kind ...

Call in to your local shop and buy a set of light cheap strings. They don't have to be the best strings in the shop because you'll probably break a few more before you get the hang of it. Replace just the one that broke (you know the old saying "If it ain't broke don't fix it") Keep practising. In a few weeks you may get more practice at changing strings, and it's quite OK to change them one at a time. Light strings are easier on the fingers. Heavier ones will make the soundboard vibrate harder, but that's not your concern right now.

If you don't have an electronic tuner, I'd rather see you spend a few dollars on one of those than purchase expensive strings that your ears can't appreciate.

In time a few things will happen. You'll learn to play, you'll learn to appreciate differences in guitar tone, you won't break as many strings, you'll experiment with different brands and gauges of strings to find the ones that suit you best. In the meantime, be careful with your cash ... you're saving for another guitar remember.

Keep in touch.

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