Jump to content


Loading
- - - - -

Too much resonance - Round 2


7 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   carol m

    Songwriting Moderator

  • Moderators



  • 7,257 posts
  • Joined 21-March 06

Posted 01 January 2011 - 02:44 AM

I'm still having problems with my classical guitar that is completely out of control. A few months ago it suddenly started resonating so much everything I play sounds like mud. I hardly ever play it any more and it used to be my 'go to' guitar. After some experimenting by plucking a string, muting it and then muting each other string to see where the resonance was coming from, this is what I found:

Low E pluck/mute: resonates mainly the B string - a lot.
A string pluck/mute: resonates mainly the low E string.
D string pluck/mute: resonates mainly the low E string.
G string: doesn't resonate much, but mainly the low E string.
B string pluck/mute: resonates the low E and A strings.
e string pluck/mute: resonates mainly the A string.

I put the old higher saddle back to see if that tamed the beast, but it was the same but harder to play so I put the lower saddle back again.

Anyone have any ideas about how I can reduce this un-wanted zinging? I really don't want to have to go through every piece working out how to try to keep every string muted all the time, and allow every played note to ring for the required note length as well. I'm certain this guitar never used to have this problem. It's not a problem on any of my other guitars. I don't see classical guitar players muting all the strings all the time.
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

#2 OFFLINE   Kirk Lorange

    Site Founder

  • Admin



  • 4,244 posts
  • Joined 31-January 04

Posted 01 January 2011 - 03:00 AM

How odd ... I can understand E resonating with B, since B is the fifth of E, but the others don't make sense. For that to just start out of the blue is weird.

#3 OFFLINE   karcey

  • Active Members


  • 1,329 posts
  • Joined 02-January 06

Posted 01 January 2011 - 05:52 AM

I think someone needs to hear this. It could be possible to upload a sample of something simple here so we can all hear it. No, better still, how about you take it down to that nice bloke in the music shop where you buy your strings and get his opinion. Might take him all of 15 seconds to tell you what's wrong.
"The music matters more than the instrument on which we play it." Jason W. Solomon

#4 OFFLINE   OldG

    Full Member

  • Active Members
  • 761 posts
  • Joined 03-August 06

Posted 01 January 2011 - 06:09 AM

Did the start of the unwanted resonation coincide with anything else? Like a change of strings,saddle or nut, for instance...



I would try packing out the nut slots with some plumbers PTFE tape to see if the strings behave themselves - If this works, too much clearance in the nut slot is the culprit. You'll need to up the string guage or fill the slot with superglue and file a new slot (or fit a new nut).


If this is a righty strung lefty then a lefty nut is needed anyway...
'Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery; None but ourselves can free our minds'.
Robert Nesta Marley 1945- 1981

#5 OFFLINE   carol m

    Songwriting Moderator

  • Moderators



  • 7,257 posts
  • Joined 21-March 06

Posted 01 January 2011 - 06:35 AM

I noticed when I sanded down the saddle to lower the action, and I thought that must have been the problem, but today when I put the old saddle back it was still the same.

Other things I've done include putting graphite on the nut - I read that this helped with something - maybe keeping in tune, or the tone? It could have been at about the time I first noticed the change.

Also it is a right hander strung left handed - I couldn't find a lefty saddle, so I got a new right hand one and reversed the saddle and back to front so the lower side was under the high strings - the intonation was ok so there was no problem then. This resonance problem didn't happen at that stage - 2+ years ago, it was a couple of months ago. I've never changed the nut because it didn't seem necessary - and also it wouldn't come out in spite of some considerable encouragement so I didn't bother.

Maybe the graphite is the culprit - I'll change the strings tomorrow and clean out the nut. I think you might be onto something Old G - yet again! :)
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

#6 OFFLINE   carol m

    Songwriting Moderator

  • Moderators



  • 7,257 posts
  • Joined 21-March 06

Posted 01 January 2011 - 06:41 AM

View Postkarcey, on 01 January 2011 - 05:52 AM, said:

No, better still, how about you take it down to that nice bloke in the music shop where you buy your strings and get his opinion. Might take him all of 15 seconds to tell you what's wrong.

Where's the fun in that Karcey? I think Old G might have solved the mystery anyway - watch this space....

But I might record something first so you can hear what a mess it currently sounds like.
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

#7 OFFLINE   carol m

    Songwriting Moderator

  • Moderators



  • 7,257 posts
  • Joined 21-March 06

Posted 01 January 2011 - 10:16 PM

Top marks to Old G
He has done it again!
He has cured my guitar
Which had gone so insane
I cleaned off the graphite
Bought a new set of strings
Now my guitar is all fixed
And can once again sing!

So, raise a glass to Old G
- No, this isn't a joke -
He knows all the answers
He's one hell-uv-a bloke. :winner: :drinking:

Thankyou!
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

#8 OFFLINE   johnmay

    Newcomer

  • Active Members
  • 78 posts
  • Joined 20-February 10

Posted 10 May 2011 - 08:45 AM

I learn so much reading this forum . Thanks guys
one day I will learn to play this thing .......then won't you be suprised





2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users