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johnmay

tune up question ??

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johnmay    0

I have changed a few frets,made a stag bridge saddle and now am thinking of changing bridge pins . any one have opinions on which might be better .bone or brass ?? or I still have some antler left.My cousins Taylor has brass pins and I like the way it sounds but am unsure if the bone might be better/

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karcey    42

That's another one of the questions I regard as impossible to answer.

If you fitted brass pins to all the guitars in the world, maybe half would sound good, and half you wouldn't be happy with. And the same goes for the bone pins. Which half does your guitar belong to?

If any material was universally better sounding than all others, that's what everyone would use. But no-one will agree what sounds best.

Tell us what you decide on.

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johnmay    0

thanks for your view.I may try both and see if there is a discernable difference. the only consensus I have found so far is that either should be better than the cheap plastic.

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karcey    42
thanks for your view.I may try both and see if there is a discernable difference. the only consensus I have found so far is that either should be better than the cheap plastic.

Yes, I've heard the same. Although I'm a bit suspicious about the degree of improvement you'll get from changing the pins.

If the ball end of the string is pulling hard on the underside of the soundboard, there will be no movement between the two. The vibrations of the string will be transferred very effectively by the saddle and the ball end. Changing the pin, which isn't even pushed in tight, can't make that much difference to the transfer of vibrations (and therefore the tone.) Saddle material is a different argument, because that's actually placed as a transfer medium. But even there, the difference in tone isn't going to be large percentages.

I think a far better system of string anchoring is the through bridge design. Doesn't do much for the pin manufacturers, but totally destroys the fear of tone loss caused by inferior pins.

One day someone will set up a guitar with a single gauge of strings right across, and a variety of pin materials, and actually measure with some sort of sensitive instrument, the amount of variation in the vibration of the soundboard. Maybe we could get Mythbusters to do it!

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johnmay    0

when I made the stag saddle for this old beat up epiphone I could tell a tremendous difference imediately but what you say about pins make sense. I don't remember where I saw it , I think it was in here, about a specialy designed shaker that is supposed to "open up" the top of a guitar so that it would sound as if it had been played for years.apparently they have had good measurable results mabe they would be interested in testing bridge pins

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johnmay    0

well I finaly bought some inexpesive brass pins ( inexpensive considering what the higher end ones cost ) and changed them one at a time trying to find out if ther was any disernable difference . I did not notice an increase in volume but there did seem to be a subtle increase in tone and sustain . this was not scientific and it could have been wishful thinking on my part ( hoping that I hadn't wasted hard to come by finances ) but I checked each string individually before and after against the one next to it and to my ear it seemed as if it had added sustain and caused the tone to be just a shade brighter .I wish I had the set up to do it I would love to see a controlled scientific study on this

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