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nickcallear

Is it true?

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hay guys

Not happy again. Ive gone and snapped yet another top e string.It was a 9s and i not best pleased.I wanted to go for 10s or 11s maybe but the shop owner said that if you put a thicker set on a floyd rose setup id have to take my guitar to have it set up to take a thicker gauge. So my question is is it true that the truss rod will have to be ajusted and the ation of the trem whould need to be ajusted?

Im not relly keen on ajusting the truss rod my self if i do have to as i dont rely know what to do and i havnt got the right tools.

Please can some one clear it up for me or is the shop owner trying to make a quick buck

Thanks in advanced

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I have guitar with a Floyd Rose and it get to be a pain. Set up on it takes me a while to do and is a pain.

But changing the gauge of strings will change the way it sounds and plays, not to mention the tension it will create on your guitar. So yeah, changing the gauge of strings will definately mean a new setup. At least from my experience. If I am incorrect, please anyone please correct me.

It may be in your best interest to learn how to set up your guitar yourself. You'll save money. You can learn how to do this online as well as just about anything guitar related. With a few inexpensive tools and some time on your end, you'll soon find out that it's really not all that hard to do. But with a Floyd Rose it will take a bit longer than a regular guitar without a Floyd Rose.

At first I was a bit intimidated to do my own setup on mine, but I did it. With trial and error, I figured it out. Now I set up all my own guitars as well as some of my friends. They even pay me sometimes. Which is another plus.

Best of luck!

Shonie

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Nick going from 10s to 11s may not stop your string breakage if that is due to a sharp edge on the locking nut or on a saddle, Check those points first. Secondly going to 11's MAY require a setup but I think it will be more at the FR side of things - changing spring tension on the trem and intonation.

I have not found Trus rod adjustments to be really necessary when going from 10s to 11s but then I dont have excessively low actions. Adjusting the truss in no big deal - increase and decrease tension by less then half a turn and leaving the neck to settle - and you wont have problems. You wont break the guitar doing that. As to tools its either a flat blade screwdriver or a allen key tp adjust the tension and a ruler and capo to determine the action. Really simple to learn.

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Take the back plate off the spring cavity and see if you have 3 or 5 springs. Thicker strings will have more tension... if you only have 3 springs installed, adding two more springs will compensate for the additional tension.

There is also adjustment at the spring "claw" that screws into the body for the springs to anchor. I have adjusted those in to compensate for additional tension as well.

I loved the tuning stability on my old FR Kramer... but won't go back to those complicated tailpieces anytime soon.

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That is one way to compensate for that additional string tension. It WILL affect the feel of the Floyd Rose operation.

The springs on the FR come in different "strengths" but for ball park figures, 3 springs will provide enough resistance to return ".09's" or ".10's", 5 springs are used for ".10's" or heavier (like me using the Heavy Bottoms/ Skinny Tops). Then they adjust the spring claw in or out to "level" the Bridge (if it is the floating style) or adjust resistance during operation.

You can try heavier strings and adjusting the claw in for more resistance... but take care. Running the screws in too far will wallow the holes and give less "grip" if you decide to adjust out later.

I personally glued two pencil erasers under my FR and pulled it tight to the body with the spring claw. That way I was spared accidental up pitching when lying my hand on the bridge, and guaranteed a swift and true return to zero.

I didn't have any "pitch up" with the bar... nor was it "easy" to operate... but I could have beat a hole in the stage and never lost tune.

Ahh, I kinda miss that. On the flip side of that... it was such a pain to intonate or change strings, and more often than not I would forget to insert the bar for the one to three times a night that I used it.

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Ive sorted my FR out now.

Ive put another two springs in the back so there is now five and the tuning stabilaty is now "spot on" as we say where im from.

The trem returns back to where it was even after relly dumping the bar.

Im slowly learning how to set the guitar up my self with thanks to GFB&B and the net in genaral.

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