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Daktari

Recording direct to computer or BOSS 600 ???

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scotty_b    16
But wouldn't that be an application issue rather than platform issue? For instance, I've heard of people transferring Pro Tools files back and forth between studios that are on a different platform.

I think it depends on the type of studio... Most pro recording studios still use Pro Tools, which is available on both platforms and from what I've heard, Pro Tools works best on Mac (like how Reaper does on PC, but probably not as drastic of a difference as Reaper lol). But a lot of mastering studios are using Sequoia (which is Samplitude's bigger brother) which is also PC only. In fact Bob Katz (the guy who wrote the book on mastering) is a Sequoia user.

But wouldn't the intuitive part be based on the recording program rather than the OS? In other words, what would make Cubase more intuitive on a Mac OS than on Windows?

And I should say that the big reason I'm pushing the PC is not just for the sake of pushing Windows. LOL But it's because of Reaper and from what I've read on the Reaper forum, it clearly runs better and is more developed on PC. Not to mention tons of amazing free VST effects for the PC also give PC another huge advantage.

So my debate isn't so much Boss vs PC vs Mac as it is Reaper vs "everything else". :D

Ditto. I don't actually use Reaper as my recording program, I use Magix Samplitude. But out of all of the recording programs I've used (every one I can legally get my hands on lol) including SAWStudio which runs at $2,500... I would put Reaper as my #2 choice behind Samplitude. If Samplitude were to vanish into thin air tomorrow, I would move right to Reaper without thinking twice. That's not just for the cheap price tag, but because it is an amazing program and it seems to be growing exponentially compared to other programs. If Reaper keeps going at the rate it has been, then one day I may even wind up replacing Samplitude with Reaper, who knows? :dunno:

I think the advantage would still be with PC or Mac in this regard as you already likely take a laptop to work. So that's one less thing to put in your bag AND you can edit while you are "supposed" to be working without looking suspicious. :winkthumb:

-tkr

I have found the Mac OS to be preferable to Windows in many ways for myself. The integration of files amongst various programmes on a Mac I have found to be far better. I have found Snow Leopard to be more stable than Windows, though I have had limited experience with 7, and that the whole experience has been far better for me.

And for what it is worth I am a very experienced PC user and have worked extensively with music software and hardware at a professional level for some time.

Yes I could do a mix down to a wav file and send that to another person, but being a Cubase user I have found it easier to send the whole file including plugin information etc. Given the studios I work for often use Cubase it was easier for me to do so. I was running Cubase on Windows before, but it did not always result in a happy experience in sharing projects between the platforms.

And it works for me and what I need it for. I have tried Reaper and wouldn't be in a hurry to go back to it.

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carol m    64

I'm happy with my Mac for everything. It always works, you don't need any security software to gum up the works and keep you wondering what/who has slowed you down now etc. I just find it easy to do most things I need. The vst's etc maybe less but there's still plenty to choose from, and newer Macs are all Intel anyway and can use vst's fine.

I use GarageBand, and now I'm learning more about what it really can do - much more than I realised - I don't miss the trash that is/was my dodgy PC at all- still need to format it, but haven't missed it or needed it yet.

I know people love Reaper, but I never really got to grips with what it can do. GarageBand is just easy and is good enough for me at the moment.

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Tekker    1
The integration of files amongst various programmes on a Mac I have found to be far better.

Hey Scotty, could you elaborate on that? I'm not sure I understand what you're referring too here.

Yes I could do a mix down to a wav file and send that to another person, but being a Cubase user I have found it easier to send the whole file including plugin information etc. Given the studios I work for often use Cubase it was easier for me to do so. I was running Cubase on Windows before, but it did not always result in a happy experience in sharing projects between the platforms.

Yeah, I was referring to the second scenario of just sending your project files to the studio and letting them open it up on the other platform. I've heard of Pro Tools guys doing this with no problem, but I wasn't sure about Cubase.

I have tried Reaper and wouldn't be in a hurry to go back to it.

How long ago did you try Reaper? As I've found out, if you're not using a very current version then the program is totally different by now. lol I was watching some youtube tutorials on Reaper and was amazed at the features that it has now. Especially since I don't use Reaper as my main recording app, so I haven't spent the time digging into the more advanced features... But I may have to change that.

-tkr

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Tekker    1
It always works, you don't need any security software to gum up the works and keep you wondering what/who has slowed you down now etc.

I actually setup a dual boot with two installations of Windows. One installation has the security stuff for Internet surfing and the other installation one has the internet disabled, no security software, and no other programs except for what I need for recording. This way nothing gets messed up on the recording side from other programs or viruses. Works great! :thumbup:

The vst's etc maybe less but there's still plenty to choose from, and newer Macs are all Intel anyway and can use vst's fine.

There are Mac versions of VST plugins, but the VST format relies on the operating system, not the processor. So an Intel Mac still can't use Windows VST's thus most of the awesome freebies that are Windows only (like the Bootsy plugins) won't work on Mac. Even Linux (which runs on PC hardware) won't run Windows VSTs without some kind of Windows emulation.

I use GarageBand

I think I mentioned it earlier in this thread, but GarageBand doesn't actually support VST (or VST instruments) at all. So it can't even use the Mac format of VST.

So things like that are key features to look out for (especially as someone who relies very heavily on VST for effects and instruments)... Believe it or not Pro Tools is another one that doesn't support the VST format. How any recording program today cannot support THE most widely used plugin format is beyond me. :brickwall:

-tkr

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carol m    64

I think I mentioned it earlier in this thread, but GarageBand doesn't actually support VST (or VST instruments) at all. So it can't even use the Mac format of VST.

-tkr

Well I'm still on baby steps with vst's, and I have the podfarm set (lots) of plugins that work, plus all the ones GarageBand comes with and also those freebies from Soundlounge (or something :dunno: ) that scotty gave the heads up for - haven't even tried any of that yet, plus Ableton lite, and cubase lite and .....and.... my RP150 with all sorts of goodies, and any KVR freebies for Macs....and Reaper for macs of course (nearly forgot!) :yeahhh: I don't think I'm about to run out of choices for a while.

Meanwhile I have to be able to string a few chords and notes together on a track to use any of these toys anyway - unfortunately that's my biggest hurdle at the moment.

Edit: I forgot Audacity. Also, I know our American members are big on Protools, but my impression is that they are not so widely used here - I could be wrong - I was once.

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Tekker    1
Well I'm still on baby steps with vst's

I'm still a firm believer that even people who are new at recording/vst/etc should have access to great tools. Much in the same way that a beginning guitarist should have access to a decent guitar to learn on. If they have some kind of wal-mart brand guitar with fishing line for strings, horrible action, fret-buzz, dead notes on the fretboard, won't hold a tune for more than 20 seconds, etc. it just adds a whole lot more problems to the learning process. Same applies to recording/mixing/vst/etc IMO. Just because you are new doesn't mean you have to use sub-par tools as it'll only make recording/mixing more difficult... Especially when there are pro level tools available either for free or very inexpensive.

I don't think I'm about to run out of choices for a while.

Having spent plenty of time sorting through loads of effects (both free and commercial) I found that you have to go through a lot of "junk" to find something even remotely worth using. IMO it's more important to have fewer really exceptional options than a lot of not-so-good options. I still have a ton of effects installed that I don't use anymore and they are just cluttering up my effects menu.

In your case, to narrow it down significantly, I would eliminate the demo versions of Ableton and Cubase (especially if it's an old version of Cubase as it's known for not having good effects). I tried a lite version of Sonar and they don't even hardly give you enough to wet your tongue. I also got a lite version of Ableton with my M-Audio interface that I haven't even taken out of the CD case. lol I would also eliminate the RP150 as well (I used the Digitech RP14 for years and the effects were pretty bad).

Be wary of Reaper on the Mac, I've heard of many complaints of bugs and crashes on the Mac side on the Reaper forum and the development is behind the PC version as well. So until that stuff is sorted out, GarageBand may be the best bet for now.

The Podfarm, Garageband, and free AU effects (since GarageBand doesn't support VST) are going to be the best bet for effects. I'd say start with the Podfarm and Garageband and exhaust all the options there before looking elsewhere (unless you are recommended specific plugins that are good) as sorting through loads of freebie effects is very tedious work. :wacko: :wacko: :wacko:

-tkr

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carol m    64
I

I'd say start with the Podfarm and Garageband and exhaust all the options there before looking elsewhere (unless you are recommended specific plugins that are good) as sorting through loads of freebie effects is very tedious work. :wacko: :wacko: :wacko:

-tkr

We are in perfect agreement tekker :D I never use anything but GarageBand and Podfarm with Reaper on Mac as backup - for if I ever need something else i.e. never after trying it out once. It actually worked well but I didn't feel the need to learn/use another platform.

I use the RP150 for the drum machine and amp simulators/voices for when I play/practice electric which is not very often (I don't have an amp). Also the other 2 platforms have amps/voices too plus all their effects - podfarm has mics etc too. For recording, I've only used the RP150 for the drum machine, and never for for its effects because I've always found plenty of useful effects with the other two - and haven't yet ever recorded anything electric.

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Had a nasty experience with the Boss last night which may be of ingterst to anyone who has not comitted their hobby dosh yet. It should handle six tracks plus v tracks plus a stereo track. I had one track full of rythm guitar, one full of bass, two each half full of alternative lead guitar and of the ten verses I had four with vocals. Technically speaking its about three and half trackfulls. True, its a very full on song but not that tricky. Then on playback the "drive busy" message lit. It is supposed to mean a variety of things but what it really seems to mean is that the Boss cannot handle the data. When this message comes on there is nowhere to go, you have to turn it off. I hoped it would feel better after a rest but it did not and I had to delete the vocals (easiest track to recreate) and bounce the other tracks to stereo and delete the originals to free up space. Once done, you can no longer tinker with individual tracks and basically the whole thing is ruined (if it ever had any merit, but thats another thing). That has finished me and Boss. I have a Line six UX1 and I just bought a lap top for recording. Of course no sooner had I got it home than the desk top pc packed up so I still dont have a dedicated pc, but I am going pc now, as soon as I have read up on Teckers lessons.

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Tekker    1

Hey michael,

That sucks about loosing your song. I've been there on the PC too, so the best advice I can give is to SAVE OFTEN (I have auto save set to save every minute) and BACKUP your hard drive. :)

-tkr

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Tekker    1

lol! yeah, I'm a save-a-holic. I don't trust computers for anything and I save constantly while I'm working on a project and then I back everything up to a separate 1.5TB hard drive. :)

So when you make the switch over to PC, make sure you get some kind of backup system in place just in case something funky happens.

-tkr

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