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deltabluesman

One Rule For Improv, Keep It Simple

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Right. But the title of this thread (one rule for imrpov, keep it simple)doesn't mention the blues.

That is a very good point, i'm getting swayed by discussions further on in the thread and i think my personal pref for simpler styles is coming into it.

My points above apply to my views on blues improv. :smile:

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I've got a jam session, rehearsal type thing for a show I've got coming up in a few weeks with a guy who I just realized is on a completely different level of musicianship than I am. He saw my old band playing out (we were very rehearsed) and told me that if we ever needed someone to play keys let him know and he'd love to jam with us. I thought I'd give him a try on this deal and he was all for it. Then I asked him if he anything he'd like to play and he told me to check out his myspace page and maybe we'd try some of the stuff on there. http://www.myspace.com/tmsproject Dang, I'm in trouble. I plan on keeping it real simple and try not to over stretch myself.

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Don't worry RR - he asked you if he could jam with you, not the other way round so he knows your level and still wants to jam with you - it sounds like you're going to make some fast progress - well done. It's an opportunity not to be missed.

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Thanks for the words but I'd be a lot more comfortable if we were doing the same music I was playing when he saw us. We had worked on that stuff for a long time to get it right and tight. This is going to be high brow improv so I need to be on my A game to stand a chance. To relate this to this thread I plan on keeping it simple. I don't think there are any rules for improv but keeping it simple will probably be a very good mind set going into this. It's not going to look super hip and cool but I plan on taking a pen and some paper and just try to play nice melodic lines.

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That sounds like a plan RR. Personally I'm always impressed with very fast (emotionless) soloing, but I don't like it and would never listen to it from choice. Keeping it simple doesn't have to be boring, and usually it isn't anyway.

Also, I'm sure that he will see that you care about turning up on time and doing your best, and that is like gold for most bands. Let us know how you go. Do you have any means of recording it? You don't have to post the result, but it might be useful to listen back to after-wards so you can know what worked well and what needs to be practiced more.

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Good idea, maybe we should record it so we can see what worked and what didn't. This is going to be are only "rehearsal" before we play a show so that should be interesting.

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I think scales are just another tool in the tool box, arps (chord tones) , upper structures, subs, digital patterns, side stepping etc all are tools which the improviser needs to internalize improvisation is all about internalizing in the woodshed and then the unconscious will feed you the lines (you hear in your brain)

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But there is also genius in complexity. Miles Davis was the master of understated phrases and this served as a wonderful contrast to Dizzy, Bird and Trane who were every bit as innovative as Miles but chose to express themselves in different ways.

Simple might be better or it might not be. Too many variables and it is entirely subjective anyway. What is a mess to one person is a thing of beauty to another.

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Yes, I have to agree, there is genius in complexity.

But you have to admit that complex things can always be broken down to simple steps. Therefore, everything is simple.

An old baseball player named Yogi Berra said "Its easy if you know how to do it"

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Excellent discussion. No complaints. Many views on guitar playing and music, worthy of considering. :yes:

My perspective: YNGWIE, superlative speed and accuracy running scales. Soulful, no.

HENDRIX, maybe the best guitar player of the 20th century. Didn't read or write music. FEELINGS! COLORS! He frustrated his band mates at times with extreme SOULFUL musical goals in mind.

MEGADETH, one of the top speedmetal bands ever. According to ELLEFSON, they never "sat down and wrote out" a MEGADETH song. However, he said it REALLY HELPS to have basic knowledge of composition, and the ins and outs of music.

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Deltabluesman.......I have to agree with Scotty_b....I dont think there are or should be "rules" for improv.....thats why its called improv.

I am only a beginner, but I do know that when I go to see a recording artist play live, I dont wanna hear the album....I want to hear them jam live! Everyone solos differently. Thats what makes it great to listen to all guitarists and then use what you see and hear to develop your own "style".

I truly believe music, especially the blues, comes from the heart....from a person's soul. Thats what I love about the blues.

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Deltabluesman.......I have to agree with Scotty_b....I dont think there are or should be "rules" for improv.....thats why its called improv.

I am only a beginner, but I do know that when I go to see a recording artist play live, I dont wanna hear the album....I want to hear them jam live! Everyone solos differently. Thats what makes it great to listen to all guitarists and then use what you see and hear to develop your own "style".

I truly believe music, especially the blues, comes from the heart....from a person's soul. Thats what I love about the blues.

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I know some instructors force their students to play from only 3 or 4 notes. It really cut out the finger exercise and force them to be intentional in their note choice. For me, playing slow or fast isn't the issue (Most of my solos are a combination of 2 for dynamic purposes). The issue is to be intentional in the choice of notes and not just give in to muscle memory at every turn.

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