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How are chords used in improvising?

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scotty_b    16

Referencing the chords as you play is what people are referring to with that.

Shredding tends to use a lot of scale runs and sequences, so you should look into that as well.

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Noodler    1

Yeah, totally agree. If by shred you mean metal, probably harmonic minor, minor pentatonic, phrygian modes are more what you're after. Economy of motion to build speed. Playing sequences, and also repeated phrases really quickly.

One exception would be the solo to "The Final Countdown" which sounds like straight arpeggios played for the first half.

Another thing to look at would be looking at the whole fretboard in the CAGED way, as say if you were in A, you could use A notes along a single string and tap those notes. ie tap the notes of chords along one string. That's a bit Van Halen though....

Metal is more riff-based, but for other styles like jazz and country, CAGED and Kirk's method work very well. The idea in those styles and like the music a lot of folks at this site like, such as fingerstyle "playing around the chord" is important. I don't think metal works like that so much.

Can pass on this tip though. If you like Zep, have a listen to the notes Jimmy rests on. It's not random. He rests on a notes more often than not, that belong to the chords that are being played. Chord notes are special in that they are strong to end phrases on.

So when you say "shred" what do you mean? There's shred jazz (fusion) to Nucore.

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wkriski    0

Many people learn scales and end up shredding up and down over a song. But if you know the chords that are going by you can target chord tones and make a more melodic solo that reflect the chords changes.

Also just playing scales will make you sound one dimensional and linear. If you use chord tones,arpeggios, etc it will introduce more intervallic and interesting playing.

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Noodler    1
Many people learn scales and end up shredding up and down over a song. But if you know the chords that are going by you can target chord tones and make a more melodic solo that reflect the chords changes.

Also just playing scales will make you sound one dimensional and linear. If you use chord tones,arpeggios, etc it will introduce more intervallic and interesting playing.

Having arpeggios in you bag of tricks is definitely worthwhile. Then you can play around the arpeggios as a way to solo. I think people fall back to scales because if chords change quickly, it's hard to follow and know where the chord tones are. Sometimes one scale or a couple of scales will fit a whole progression.

I am amazed at how often I like something and it turns out to just be pentatonic again though.

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Yaakovhoter    0

Hi

Every chord is build out by at least three notes.

Basically- If you play each note alone (each string alone) as a single note, you can create melodies and improvise only with the noes of the chord you play.

If you know three positions for each chord, and you play there' notes, then you can shred over the whole finger board.

You can improve it by learning specific arpeggio shapes and learn licks over each chord shape but this is the principal.

Good luck

Yaakov Hoter from gypsyjazzschool.com

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sheraton    20

Hi

Every chord is build out by at least three notes.

Basically- If you play each note alone (each string alone) as a single note, you can create melodies and improvise only with the noes of the chord you play.

If you know three positions for each chord, and you play there' notes, then you can shred over the whole finger board.

You can improve it by learning specific arpeggio shapes and learn licks over each chord shape but this is the principal.

Good luck

Yaakov Hoter from gypsyjazzschool.com

+1 ;) to the above = pretty much sums it up

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