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sidpatel

A doubt regarding my electronic tuner

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:yes: Hi Friends,

I bought a new electronic tuner ( Korg GA-30 ).

The tuner supports 5 semitones.....Now my doubt

is that if i select the 1st semitone ( i.e 1-flat ),

would that tuning be called E-Flat tuning ?

If, that is the case then what about 2-flats,

3-flats, 4-flats and 5-flats?

Has the "flat" symbol on the top left got to do

something with the E-Flat tuning ? I am confused between

the E-flat tuning and different semi-tones. Is there a

relation ?

Looking for help..

--Sid.

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If you copy this into your browser you can download an instruction manual. It says CA 30 but it's a misprint

How to Tune with a Korg Chromatic Electronic Tuner CA-30

Hope this helps. Tony. :wheelchai

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Hi Eliot,

Did you intend to give me some link?

Actually i cant see a link here ..

Also, if I tune it to E-Flat then the chord

structure would change ..right ??

Cheers

--Sid.

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Hi eliot...thanks ...

My electronic tuner seems to be tuning one octave higher...

I am really not sure whether an Eb or Ebb tuning on the tuner

would equal the actual EADGBE tuning on the guitar.....

Also not sure whether the fingering of chords would shift

places....

Hoping for someone to help....!! :):)

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I have the Korg GA-30 and I have no problem with it.

The "flat" button is for tuning into alternate tunings. For tuning into standard tuning just make sure you have no flats.

For alternate tunings you use the flat button a number of times depending upon what tuning you want. For example, say you want to tune to drop D. You hit the flat button twice to get 2 flats, then tune the low E string. It will show E6 on the readout to show which string is being tuned, and when the needle is in the middle it's now tuned to D (E - two semitone = D). Now hit the "flat" button until NO flats are showing and tune the rest of the strings.

If you wanted to do a Keith Richards open G (DGDGBD), you hit the flat button twice and tune the 6th, 5th, and 1st strings (which tunes them to D, G, and D, respectively). Remember that even with the flats the readout will show E6, A5, and E1. This simply indicates what string is being tuned, not what note. Next remove the flats and tune the 4th, 3rd, and 2nd normally.

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Hi Stars,

I did exactly the same thing...with the same tuner ...and

tuned my guitar to EADGBE....

The strings are too stretched but sound fine.

Also, my new guitar is a Fender and the distance between

the string and the fret is too much , so makes it difficult

to press.......Does this make it a bad quality guitar ?? :)

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Hi Sentry...Thanks....

The guitar appears to be in tune..using the Korg GA - 30...

But my new guitar (Fender) is such that the distance between the

strings and the frets is too much....

Didnt notice it while buying.......

Does it make it a bad quality piece ?? The sound is fine...but just

that it becomes difficult to play when this distance is too much. :)

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That's something you can fix yourself. Search this forum and elsewhere for tips on "guitar setup" and "setting string action". Those are the two phrases to search for that will lead you to a plethora of online advice.

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I have a GA 30 Tuner and a Qwik Tune Tuner, both are easy to use once you get the hang of them but like everything else with guitar it does take a bit of time so don't worry too much about it Sid, the Korg tuners are the ones most people recommend, also worth learning to tune by ear if you can too, there's a lesson for that here I think, as for the high action, you do get that on some guitars, don't know Fender acoustics, I have a Yamaha and the action was lowered to make it easier to play, that is something you can correct yourself or if you're afraid of messing up your guitar get a guitar tech to do it, it's a straightforward job for a tech. Allthumbs mentioned it on one of your other threads, if you've just bought your guitar you could have a word with the shop, they might do a set up for you or exchange for a more suitable one, high action is a pain and not what you really want when learning guitar it's hard enough getting the hang of chords etc. the last thing you want is a wrestling match, I wish the guys that make these entry level guitars would show a bit more consideration for people starting out, I have an Encore Guitar which is advertised for beginners but the action is way high they really need a kick up the backside.

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