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skinnybloke

Renovating an old favourite.

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Just incredible Skinny ,what a transformation. Those before and after shots really tell the story of the amazing work and love you put into this restoration, hard to believe it's the same guitar. Anyone who has the skill to take a old beaten up guitar with a head stock held together by BHP and turn it into a thing of beauty has my utmost respect and admiration.

I have really enjoyed this thread ,I think you should hit the hock shops ,find another project guitar and continue to keep us all entertained.

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You are a very resourceful man, Skinny. Lookin' good.

Apologies for missing this the other day Steve.

As Plato said "necessity is the mother of invention"! I messed around with that clamp for nearly a week before I decided to use it.

In typical Murphy fashion I met a guy today who tells me he has 3 bridge clamps I'm welcome to use, should my bridge ever fall off.

Really put my mind at ease...:crying2: :crying2: :crying2:

Thanks RB

Matt, Cirrus's project has me a bit intrigued.... but Annie wants all the tables redone first! I can't think where she got that notion from:) :)

Annie pointed out that I hadn't mentioned how much this cost, what tools were used, or how much time it took... it's probably relevant.

Sandpaper: 180/240/400/800/1000/1200 ..$24

Veneers ..$30

Masking tape ..$13

Stain ..$18

Shellac ..$12.50

Methylated Spirits ..$3.50

Hide glue ..$16

Bone saddle ..$4

Rosette Free .. C Mark Wonthaggi

Large eraser ..$3

Super glue ..$3

Meguiars No7 auto polish ..$26

Total ..$153

Things like wood glue, putty etc I already had.

Tools used:

Router ..Headstock veneer removal

Drill ..Slots

Coping/Fret saw ..Shaping head stock veneers

Vise ..Necessity

Files ..Round, half round and flat all bastards.

Clamps ..Quite a few :)

Chisels ..1/4 inch

Hand plane ..splice sizing

Jig saw ..splice sizing

Labour ..About 120 hours, most of it on the french polishing.

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Great job skinny - it looks wonderful and sounds great too. When you were making the saddle the right height, are those the measurements from the body to the top of the saddle with a metal ruler/T square laid along the fretboard? I fitted a new saddle and just filed it down with a nail file till it looked about right but I didn't really have a clue if that was right or not. Some guidance from The Expert would be much appreciated :yeahhh:

You realise now that you are our go-to man for all things lutherian (?). You could put that on your next census form under 'religion' - that would confuse the beaurocrats (always good).

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Skinny, even though I don't work with wood, I'd have been tempted if I had a guitar with Brazilian Rosewood. Since I have no skills I likely would have scraped together and paid someone.

The price might have been steep, though. You said about 120 hours. Any decently experienced luthier would probably charge me about 800 - 1k USD :gulp: Who knows how much one would charge? I guess the better their reputation, the higher the charge. Ya can't get a BW guitar for under 2k probably.

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are those the measurements from the body to the top of the saddle with a metal ruler/T square laid along the fretboard?

No Carol the measurements are from the top of the 12th fret to the bottom of the straight edge.

If you have a look at the photo you'll see I have a metal rule clamped to the straight edge and sitting on top of the 12 fret.

The back end of the straight edge is a poofteenth above the 1st fret.

Basically, the bottom of the straight edge represents the bottom of the string.

The reason I used imperial is it's just about impossible to measure 3.2mm or 3.9mm.

Lutherian! :claping: :claping: :claping:

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and just filed it down with a nail file.

Now that's resourcefulness at work Carol. That must have taken ages....at least you wouldn't have gotten the horrible burnt tooth smell that you get with a belt sander:isaynothing: :isaynothing: :isaynothing:

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The price might have been steep, though. You said about 120 hours. Any decently experienced luthier would probably charge me about 800 - 1k USD :gulp: Who knows how much one would charge? I guess the better their reputation, the higher the charge. Ya can't get a BW guitar for under 2k probably.

I have no idea how much a pro job would cost either Steve. Even taking into account that a lutherian :) would do the job in a quarter of the time it would still cost a bomb.

Thanks very much Allsport.

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No Carol the measurements are from the top of the 12th fret to the bottom of the straight edge.

Basically, the bottom of the straight edge represents the bottom of the string.

So the measurement of 5/32inch on the 12 fret is the clearance between the estimated bottom of the string and the 12 th fret?

And the "high E but lowered the straight edge to 4/32" is the clearance between the 12th fret and the estimated bottom of the high E string?.

And....the mark you made on the saddle is the level that must be showing level with the top of the bridge when the saddle is in the bridge?

The problem with using a nail file (holding the saddle and pressing down onto the file) and guesswork is that I think the action is too high (not enough filing), and I found after a bit of filing that I only had half a thumb nail left on my right hand. Nice and pointy though.

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And....the mark you made on the saddle is the level that must be showing level with the top of the bridge when the saddle is in the bridge?

The little marks on either end of the saddle show where the straight edge intersected with the saddle, I drew the straight line between them and that's what I sanded the saddle down to. It's hard to pick up in the photo, but the pencil line is on an angle IE: it's 1/32nd closer to the bottom of the saddle on the left side.

Thanks Manta!

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Sandpaper: 180/240/400/800/1000/1200 ..$24

Veneers ..$30

Masking tape ..$13

Stain ..$18

Shellac ..$12.50

Methylated Spirits ..$3.50

Hide glue ..$16

Bone saddle ..$4

Rosette Free .. C Mark Wonthaggi

Large eraser ..$3

Super glue ..$3

Meguiars No7 auto polish ..$26

Total ..$153

+1 extremely patient wife. Priceless :hammer:

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I don't have a straight edge and so I measured by eye, pencil, and cardboard the gap between the bottom of the string and the top of the 12th fret. I found the high e was 4/32 and the low E was 6/32 so I'll file it down a bit more. I thought it was still high but now I'll lower it a bit more. So thanks your measurements info.

Also, saddles are so cheap I can always get another and try again if I start to get string buzz. The geeky techy guys at a local top-notch guitar tech workshop were very friendly last time I was there (sometimes it helps to be female in an all male guitar-techy world) they offered to help me if I got stuck, but I still want to do it properly myself if I can.

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What a truly outstanding job Skinny!:claping: :claping:

I've been following this progress in complete awe. What an amazing job you have done. Not only talent, but the patience that has gone into this is unbelievable.

Any idea what the value of the guitar would be now? I know...priceless.

Again...great job Skinny!

Annette

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Thanks Annette and Will.

I don't know what it would be worth Annette, you don't see them for sale that often. This ones no longer an original, I imagine that would devalue it quite a bit.

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Skinny - I haven't been around here much as I've been busy with a lot of other things, so just had a chance to read through this entire thread today. You did an absolutely awesome job bringing your old Maton back to life - the transformation is incredible! I tip my hat to you for your patience, resourcefulness and skills, sir. :winkthumb: It was definitely a labor of love, and you now own a guitar which is not only beautiful, it's truly one of a kind....and it has to be bursting with good Mojo from all the love you've shown it!

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Thanks Mac and Kenny.

I especially liked the poor man's band saw idea. Very clever.

Lol..yep, that came in very handy a few times. So much of doing this kind of project is about adapting.

Update:

It's 3 months now and all is good.

My big worry was the French polish finish. Having never done it before I was concerned that I may have done something wrong in the application and it would craze and flake, but it just seems to get harder as time goes by.

I haven't even put a ding in it "yet".

It does scratch easier than a Nitro finish and I have taken to using a cotton cloth on my leg when playing it.

The difference in sound quality is truly amazing.

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WOW I just finished reading through this thread start to finish .You are trully a talented man but more than that you must really be patient .I know I would have brought out the electric sander and put a hole through it ( I hate sanding too ) truly inspirational

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