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skinnybloke

Renovating an old favourite.

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skinnybloke    4

Thank you very much Shonie. Donahueghs I am hanging to get strings on this thing.

Thanks again Chris, the more I researched laquer finishes the more I read about french polish. Karcey mentioned earlier about wipe on finishes....I thought "what the heck" worst comes to worst, I sand it off and start again.

I cannot tell you how wonderful a french polished guitar feels...even without strings!

During the week I've done another 8 sessions of french polishing, It's surprisingly hard work once you get a feel for it.

I've been using a bench vise to hold it in place when I'm polishing.

1514a.jpg

1514a.jpg

This pic doesn't do it justice, but you can see by the reflections at the bottom just how glossy it's becoming.

Tomorrow I'll sand with 1200 to take off any high spots, then a few more sessions with thinned shellac to gloss it up.

Hopefully, that'll be the end of the finishing stage. >>>>

IMG_1515.jpg

I can see why people rave about this finish, it is absolutely stunning!

Next steps are:

Cutting the tape off, sounds easy but I am freaking about it!

Reinstalling the bridge.

Fitting the Bridge Doctor, to remove the bulge in the top.... That's if it ever arrives! (Who's great idea was it to put the US so far away from Australia?)

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carol m    64
.

Who's great idea was it to put the US so far away from Australia?

Kevin maybe? I really hope it sounds good after all this - if it doesn't, I suppose I could give it a home if you were really desperate to get rid of it.

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shonie777    3

That Maton is looking more and more beautiful every time I check out this thread. Judging from the first pictures of what it looked like before you began work on it, it looked like a basket case. Where you’re at on it now, is simply amazing! I can not believe all the hard work you have put into it. It truly shows when you look at the pictures of what you have done. A labor of love I must say! Not very many people have the patients to do something like that. I admire your dedication to your Maton project. It has become a work of art my friend.

Shonie

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skinnybloke    4

Kevin bloody Wilson maybe Carol :), the bridge doctor still isn't here and I'm sick of waiting for it.

Thank you again Shonie, it's not so much hard work, just trying to get it right. Having never done this before I'm probably over doing it a bit .

I've been waiting for some bits to arrive and had a short holiday, so not a lot happened over the last couple of weeks.

I had a minor disaster when I decided to do another bodying session of french polish before sanding. I put a bit (lot) too much polish onto my applicator, and the spirits ate half the exising polish away!

I didn't get any pics of it, but what a mess. I sanded the entire back off with 400 wet and dry and started again. I weren't too happy at the time

but it's worked out for a better finish.

Wet sanded the guitar with 1200>>>>

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A few more thin sessions of polishing>>>>>>

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I keep telling myself I'm finished with the polishing......Then decide to do "one" more....I must be a masochist. Tonight I caught a fingernail on the top and had to sand that out, another few sessions on the top.

Got a new bone saddle>>>

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It fit's the bridge slot perfectly>>>

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It was meant to be a bit thicker than it is, but I'm not going to complain.

A bag of hide glue >>>>

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Ratio = 1 part glue to 1.9 parts water by weight. 10 grams glue> 19 grams water.

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The red wines just a prop :)

Let the glue mix sit for an hour...

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Heat to 145f stirring it.

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Take it off the heat when it runs off the spoon..

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It's now in the fridge looking like a congealed mass of gelatin, when I'm ready to use it I heat it back up to 145f and brush it on.

I should mention that this glue is for reglueing the bridge, it's used because it is stronger than wood glue and can be undone without damaging the wood it's adhered to.

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carol m    64
Guitar looks fantastic , though that table could do with a bit of attention.:isaynothing:

Time hang out a shingle I say Skinny.

[ATTACH]8615[/ATTACH]

How did you do that Matt? It's awesome. We sure do have some clever and talented people here at GFB.

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mattz196    15
How did you do that Matt? It's awesome. We sure do have some clever and talented people here at GFB.

Oh and how I wish I was one them.

Very easily done Carol , I found a pic on the web of a guitar repair shop sign, changed text to "Skinnys" with photoshop style bit of software, I used "Gimp" it's freeware and does more tricks than I'll every get close to learning.

8618.attach

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skinnybloke    4

That's a classic Matt..... I'm going to print out a miniature of it and stick it to the inside of the guitar :)

I wish you could see the gloss for real Eddie!

Thanks Steve, It's turning out so much better than I originally hoped.

Getting the bridge on is giving me grief, I cannot beg borrow or steal suitable clamps.

Very frustrating!:reallymad: :reallymad:

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carol m    64
Oh and how I wish I was one them.

Very easily done Carol , I found a pic on the web of a guitar repair shop sign, changed text to "Skinnys" with photoshop style bit of software, I used "Gimp" it's freeware and does more tricks than I'll every get close to learning.

[ATTACH]8618[/ATTACH]

Brilliant Matt! I'm going to print it out and stick it on my door. You are a clever clogs. Thanks a heap.

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skinnybloke    4

I finally got hold of a clamp with long enough jaws to glue the bridge, problem is the jaws are too long.

I think i've worked out a way to make it work, but not sure.

Located the bridge in position over the masking tape. Using the bridge as a guide I sliced through the finish with a blade.

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Peeled back the masking tape..........

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Mapped out brace positions and bridge plate...

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Made a clamp caul that straddled the bracing but contacted firmly with the bridge plate...

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After 10 or 12 dry runs I glued it up with the hide glue and clamped it on.

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As you can see, the clamp jaws go way past the bridge, it took awhile to nut it out but It looks like all those bits of hardwood and wedges have worked.

This was a very unorthodox method of clamping the bridge on (and highly unrecommended :), if you ever have to do a bridge.....get the right clamps in advance.

That thing weighs a ton and I was really worried about it stressing the top.

Working with hot hide glue is a challenge, I had about 60 seconds from applying the glue to get that mess assembled, tightened and wedged....so I didn't stop to take pics.

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skinnybloke    4

The bridge is finally on ...

IMG_1571.jpg

IMG_1571.jpg

Using my (t)rusty old roofing square to mark the saddle height. The steel rule is clamped to the straight edge at 5/32inch on the 12 fret, the other end is just about resting on the 1st fret.

I marked the saddle with a pencil where the straight edge indicated.

Same for the high E but lowered the straight edge to 4/32s.

IMG_1576.jpg

Gives me a starting point for the saddle height..

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I had nothing to do while letting the glue harden, so I pulled the tuners apart and cleaned them..

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.......4 hours later>>>>>>>>

I put the tuners and strings on, they're not up to tension yet....but it's ready to play in the morning :)

Some before and after shots...

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Finished!

From what I understand the french polish will shrink back into the grain a bit as it hardens. If that's the case, I'll add a few more layers to it when I change the strings.

Some links I found very helpful.......

FRETS.COM Acoustic guitar instrument care, repair for players, luthiers A wealth of info on guitar repair.

I watched all his videos before starting the polishing stage, he rambles on a bit but shows very clearly the tecnique for polishing a guitar.

fp introduction contents page Excellent written instructions on the entire french polishing process.

French Polish Leveling 12 There is a page missing in the above link, this is it.

Thanks everybody for your comments.

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karcey    42

That is a beautiful job of work. And it's doubly beautiful when you realize so many people would've scrapped it as just an old guitar and you've taken the time to bring it back to life.

Congratulations.

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SkyNet    1

Truly beautiful, an amazing job Skinny. :clap::thumbup1::claping:

How does she sound????????

Annie will pop that puppy in the mail to me tonite whilst you sleep. I am looking for a new guitar eh :P

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eddiez152    129

Excellent,

Now reach inside there the next time you replace the strings and on the paper tag add "rebuilt by skinnybloke" Dec.4th,2009

Outstanding work. I truly believe you have achieved the grand title of "Luthier" :winkthumb:

eddie

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