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Zax

Thoughts on tunes as animals

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Zax    0

Many fine instrumentals and songs are written in minutes or little more. Leo Kottke’s “Machine 3”, Gordon Lightfoot’s “Song for a Winter’s Eve”, as just two examples. However, many more equally fine songs took much, much longer to complete. It’s been said often that the initial line or riff or verse will strike with that sheer thrill of inspiration. The rest may follow immediately. More often it doesn’t. Then craft and hard work take over and if pursued successfully, the result will appear to have been written in minutes. Sort of like your pen leaked onto the page and this tune appeared.

A good tune is a wild animal. Sometimes it will come right up to you and even let you stroke it. It may even hang around and make itself easy to capture. Most times it will bolt away, leaving only a tantalizing memory of that exhilarating glimpse and you’ll never see it again unless you run after it.

However, if you run too fast, it will elude you----perhaps forever. Pursue with caution and let it come to you. It always will. Eventually.

Better to leave a tune unfinished than to write something in frustration that is less than you know it could be. A tune worth doing is worth pursuing. Patiently.

Fine day to all,

Zax

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carol m    64

Darn it...I just wrote a really interesting reply :winkthumb: but Firefox crashed and lost it before I posted. I have to go out now, but I shall return.

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Zax    0
Darn it...I just wrote a really interesting reply :winkthumb: but Firefox crashed and lost it before I posted. I have to go out now, but I shall return.

Can't wait.

Zax

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carol m    64

Last night I was watching a program about the Beatles about how they wrote, rehearsed and recorded their albums. The early albums were mostly the songs they had accumulated from playing live, plus new ones also designed to be played at live gigs. After making their early albums their horizons broadened under the influence of their producer who introduced them to over-dubbing, more complex layering and the sounds of instruments that were 'new' to them eg oboes and french horns.

At that stage - after Revolver I think - they recorded albums by turning up at the studio on day 1 with maybe a few ideas but no songs at all. Then they bounced ideas, riffs and phrases off each other and came up with all the more sophisticated songs of their middle and late period. At this stage onwards they did no live appearances because their songs could not be reproduced outside the studio in anything like the original studio recording. They spent months in the studio, but all their songs were generated there as well as being recorded and produced.

All three guitarists came up with riffs, and anyone could come up with a phrase or idea. Sometimes something a technician said or something they overheard, or read in the newspaper. They got their lyric ideas from anywhere by keeping the ears and brains open to everything they heard, and immediately worked on it as a group. Anything that didn't work out they already had recorded in rehearsal form, and would sometimes come up with a new song later where it fitted better. One song, I can’t remember which, had a real shift of everything in the middle and was in fact an old song idea of John’s shoe-horned into the middle of a newer Paul based song that needed a ‘middle’. George was also a big creative influence in the group at this stage with lyrics as well as music.

So......Zax, they did exactly what you recommend in your original post. :winkthumb:

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Zax    0
Last night I was watching a program about the Beatles about how they wrote, :

Thanx for the fine info Carol. Never heard this before, and never realized that they (Beatles) had stopped making live appearances.

I have a friend that is an excellent musician, plays several instruments, (guitar, mandolin, drums, etc.,) also sings and makes masterful cd's in his home studio using everything from actual guitar and other real instruments, to digital grand pianos, sitars, and whatever else suits his ear. His stuff is very different from mine both in style and genre.

For me, I love to hear other musicians' approaches, but nothing appeals to me more than just guitar----or vocal and guitar. I like the idea of being able to sit down and play anywhere just what is on my cd. Not to say that playing and improvising with someone at a jam----whatever the instrument, isn't wonderful as well. And although I enjoy very much hearing live recording where some great improvising is going down, I have to agree with something Leo Kottke said in an interview. (I find he has echoed many of the same views that I hold----just in relation to my own approach). What he said roughly was that he doesn't improvise or change much with his tunes. When he composes and gets the ideas he likes, he wants to hear them again.

Saw Leo live many years ago, and he was exactly like the record. With of course the added special dynamic and presence of anything live. Interestingly, like Kirk, he has gone from a multitude of tunings to mostly standard and dropped D. I ordered Kirk's package week and a half ago, and am really looking forward to doing likewise. Not that I would ever quit alternate tunings, but I love the stuff that I've heard Kirk play. Also impressed with his character.

Best regards and have a fine day.

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Many fine instrumentals and songs are written in minutes or little more. Leo Kottke’s “Machine 3”, Gordon Lightfoot’s “Song for a Winter’s Eve”, as just two examples. However, many more equally fine songs took much, much longer to complete. It’s been said often that the initial line or riff or verse will strike with that sheer thrill of inspiration. The rest may follow immediately. More often it doesn’t. Then craft and hard work take over and if pursued successfully, the result will appear to have been written in minutes. Sort of like your pen leaked onto the page and this tune appeared.

A good tune is a wild animal. Sometimes it will come right up to you and even let you stroke it. It may even hang around and make itself easy to capture. Most times it will bolt away, leaving only a tantalizing memory of that exhilarating glimpse and you’ll never see it again unless you run after it.

However, if you run too fast, it will elude you----perhaps forever. Pursue with caution and let it come to you. It always will. Eventually.

Better to leave a tune unfinished than to write something in frustration that is less than you know it could be. A tune worth doing is worth pursuing. Patiently.

Fine day to all,

Zax

hmmm.. just a thought, what if we just shot it with a tranquilizer dart from a helicopter? note i'm not much of a writer! just kidding, very creative way of putting it...:winkthumb:

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Zax    0
hmmm.. just a thought, what if we just shot it with a tranquilizer dart from a helicopter? note i'm not much of a writer! just kidding, very creative way of putting it...:winkthumb:

You made me smile with this extension mantablueraider. Quick humor much appreciated.

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You made me smile with this extension mantablueraider. Quick humor much appreciated.
glad you liked, and glad you have a sense of humor. seems the longer i'm married the better i get at it lol.. sorta an unconsious self defense mechanism.. hmmm... or self defiance? yeah, it's bad!:yes:

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Zax    0
glad you liked, and glad you have a sense of humor. seems the longer i'm married the better i get at it lol.. sorta an unconsious self defense mechanism.. hmmm... or self defiance? yeah, it's bad!:yes:

Have to agree that humor can be both of the above as you wrote, mantablueraider. Also have to confess that it's more used in sharing in my household (38 years married), as I suspect it is in yours, (in spite of your humorous cynicism). Best regards and thanx for your insights.

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Have to agree that humor can be both of the above as you wrote, mantablueraider. Also have to confess that it's more used in sharing in my household (38 years married), as I suspect it is in yours, (in spite of your humorous cynicism). Best regards and thanx for your insights.
WOW, 38 years! congradulations!

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