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michaelcreese

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I am sure its been asked before but here it is again. I have a nasty, but not overwhelming hum when I am connected into a BR900CD recorder. If I touch the strings or the jacks it stops. I suppose its an earth thing or maybe incduction? If I buy better quality leads, or even those ones with the big round multi pin connectors, might it stop? Perhaps it always happens to everyone but since there is almost always some contact with the strings maybe it doesnt matter but my recordings are plagued with noises and I have to start to iron them out. Would really appreciate some advice from the more experienced out there. Thanks.

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I am sure its been asked before but here it is again. I have a nasty, but not overwhelming hum when I am connected into a BR900CD recorder. If I touch the strings or the jacks it stops. I suppose its an earth thing or maybe incduction? If I buy better quality leads, or even those ones with the big round multi pin connectors, might it stop? Perhaps it always happens to everyone but since there is almost always some contact with the strings maybe it doesnt matter but my recordings are plagued with noises and I have to start to iron them out. Would really appreciate some advice from the more experienced out there. Thanks.

Well, recording puts everything, everything, under the microscope and amplifies it, including noise. You most definitely want higher quality cables. If you're getting a hum from your guitar, it could be the guitar electronics, but not always.

Maybe tell us what you're using to record (cables, mic, amp...).

Steve

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Hi Steve and thanks for the reply. Recording set up is very simple. Usually a Telecaster with single pin jack, three metre odd cable, straight into the back of a Roland BR900CD which is a little digital recording deck which I listen to through headphones since I have no monitors. I dont know how to rate the cables but I pay about 17 euros for one and on the rubber it has the word "noisless". Because of what you said I have just been to check to see if the noise is there via the amp. Through an effects box into the amp it is silent. So, it would seem to be the recorder. What a pity. Is there any device you know of that could go to inline to stop it? Can you guess at what actually causes it? Many thanks

Mike

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Hi Steve and thanks for the reply. Recording set up is very simple. Usually a Telecaster with single pin jack, three metre odd cable, straight into the back of a Roland BR900CD which is a little digital recording deck which I listen to through headphones since I have no monitors. I dont know how to rate the cables but I pay about 17 euros for one and on the rubber it has the word "noisless". Because of what you said I have just been to check to see if the noise is there via the amp. Through an effects box into the amp it is silent. So, it would seem to be the recorder. What a pity. Is there any device you know of that could go to inline to stop it? Can you guess at what actually causes it? Many thanks

Mike

Wait, not sure I get it. You say 'Tele straight into the recorder' but you mention amp and effects boxes. Sorry, sometimes I'm thick. Would you just draw a simple pic or just say something like:

Tele-> Effects Pedal -> Amp -> Mic -> BR900, etc. I saw the recorder online so I know what you're talking about.

Thanks,

Steve

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Hi. No, your not being dense, I am confusing you. What happened was that when I was replying to your post I could not remember when this hum happens and when it doesnt so I went off and checked. Guitar direct to deck, hum. When I take it from the deck and put it through the effects pedal and to the amp, just for playing not recording, it does not hum and is as good as gold. So, I figure there is something about the recording deck that causes the hum, and so there must be some way of stopping it. Obliged if you can tell me. Thanks, Mike

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It could be other things, but most likely it is because you're hooking the guitar up directly to the deck. Many electric guitars are a little 'hummy' to begin with and need help. Some more than others. And that's usually because all of the electronics to the guitar are not 'star' grounded, or all grounded to the same metal on all of the guitar. That's why when you touch the strings, you are becoming a strong (relative) ground connection. Your body is a 'floating ground', if you will.

To compound the problem, realize that the electronic signal from the guitar is a very low level signal. If you don't have a good shielded cable(s), then that cable will pick up noise and add to the signal.

Anyway, since most guitars need help, what happens when you plug into effects pedals or units and then and amp, it can either help or amplify the buzz. Moral of the story is don't hook your guitar directly into the recorder, unless you want to pass it through a direct box with a ground lift. I'm not sure that would work, but it's worth a shot.

Steve

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Thank you Steve. That may work for the mike too. When I get home I will try connecting to the recorder via the pedal, I dont have to have any effects on do I? Let you know but thanks so much for taking the time

Mike

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Thank you Steve. That may work for the mike too. When I get home I will try connecting to the recorder via the pedal, I dont have to have any effects on do I? Let you know but thanks so much for taking the time

Mike

Well, there's no 'wrong' way, it's all about the sound you want. So, just experiment. But one thing's for sure: always use good shielded cables when recording.

As long as you have a good shielded mic cable, you shouldn't have any troubles plugging it straight into the BR900. But, you will most likely have trouble if the microphone cable does not have three conductors when you plug it in to the BR900. Here again, a grounding issue.

No, you should experiment when it's plugged in to the effects and bypassed compared with plugged straight in. You should compare everything against every possible situation in the chain in every situation.

Have fun with it!

Steve

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