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azerothian

How to read guitar sheet music?

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Hi I am still a beginner. I learn most songs from googling guitar tablature or reading chord boxes. I played piano maybe 17 years ago when I really young, but that doesn't help because I remember nothing from sheet music.

The only thing I remember is a treble clef and I don't even remember what that is.

I cannot afford a teacher or have the time to go to one, so sadly I must teach myself. I never found tab or chord boxes hard, but this looks pretty difficult.

Is there a book I should get that will teach me? My friend gave me this old book called "Scales & Modes in the beginning" but I can't read any of the scales in it because it's all sheet music.

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Well you're in luck azerothian because our very own Fretsource has done a whole series of lessons on this (and other things). Here is a link to his lessons

http://www.guitarforbeginners.com/forum/fretsources-lessons/9731-standard-music-notation/

and here is a site where you'll find free guitar sheet music in notation/stave form from easy to hard - I'll use the link to their fretboard/stave app so you can learn what goes where.

Fretboard - www.eythorsson.com

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Is there an opposite of this, you click on the notation staff and

the possiblities appear on the fretboard?

Hmm.. I just went see if I can do that on Tux guitar and it worked but only in the open position. I don't know what good is that but it's freeware and you can download it.

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Well you're in luck azerothian because our very own Fretsource has done a whole series of lessons on this (and other things). Here is a link to his lessons

http://www.guitarforbeginners.com/forum/fretsources-lessons/9731-standard-music-notation/

and here is a site where you'll find free guitar sheet music in notation/stave form from easy to hard - I'll use the link to their fretboard/stave app so you can learn what goes where.

Fretboard - www.eythorsson.com

Wow thank you so much. I will be reading through this all thanks.

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I found that the best way to learn the relationship between notes on the stave and notes on the fretboard was to 'read' /play directly from a simple piece of sheet music. It's slow at first but you quickly get to know the notes on the stave. It took me a bit longer to learn the notes above and below the stave on those lines called ledger lines (I think).

Start with a single line of notes and then move on to simple pieces with 2 voices - melody line and bass line, and then you get to hear the simple harmonies this makes and it's great. Simple (and slow at first) but still great. At first you may have to work out each note using the Every Good Boy Deserves Fruit for the lines and F A C E for the spaces but it's not hard, you just have to do it to learn it.

That Iceland site has sight-reading pieces from truly basic to advanced. Also some of the 'collections' have some easy pieces too. Check out the Carulli and Guiliani collections for example.

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I used to read notations and I'm glad that tablatures came around. :)

No problem with notations but deciding where to play it on the guitar is a bit of work. I know the standard methods of positioning , thanks Mel Bay :yeahhh:

but the artists don't do that, at least most of 'em.

It did make me know my fretboard more because I had to. I started guitar at age 10 back in 1960. Back then there was nothing but my sis's piano books. I still remember my sis screaming, "Mama! Billy's writing all over my piano books." :winkthumb:

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I'm also interested in learning how to read sheet music, mainly because I want to be able to buy PVGs which I've just recently discovered exist.

ww.amazon.co.uk/gp/reader/063407881X/ref=sib_rdr_ex?ie=UTF8&p=S00C&j=0#reader-page

This above is a link to an example.

I've noticed the chord diagrams, I'm confused. Is this showing piano and guitar together? Or solely the guitar chords to play?

Thanks for any help :) so confused!

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Hey. Tab is different from sheet music. It has six lines that represent the guitar strings it looks like this:

e---------0---------------------

B---------2---------------------

G-------- 2----2----------------

D---------2----------3--------------

A---------0---------------------

E------------------------------

The numbers tell you what fret to place your fingers. The first one is an A chord. e played open B is fretted atthe second fret and so on. You play all strings at once when they are lined up lime that. When set apart individually like the 2 and the 3 you just pick those strings versus strumming.

Now if you are looking for help on actual sheet music...a treble cleft means you are playing treble notes which are the higher notes. The three treble notes on a guitar are eGB. the rest are bass but theyde still be notated on a treble staff.

The following is a link to fretsources lesson on notation...it be pointless for mento make another lesson here since there is one already in existence in this forum.

http://www.guitarforbeginners.com/forum/index.php?/topic/8540-standard-music-notation/

The thing you need to work on when reading sheet music is translating the notes to the strings on the guitar, knowing where to fret them.

Now tab is easier to read as a guitarist but if you wantto make music and share it with different instrumen players then unless they know what to play based on what you at then it's a must to learn sheet music...and it's just more efficient too especially if you are sharing it with professionals...you know tenones that went to school for it.

I learned sheet music when I played the tuba in school and there is a lot of notation especially when it comes to the guitar. But I've found sheet music to be simply awesome and amazing. It shows you how to play music all the way and even if you've never heard the song before you could play it with sheet music.

With tab you practically HAVE to know the song inside out to know how to play the tab to how it was recorded unless you want to do your own little version...

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It seems to be piano notations with guitar chords for accompament. Seeing the lowest note seems to be beyond the bass E of the guitar.

The staff continues on forever as long as there is notes to play no matter how low the notes are. The lower the note the lower it goes on the staff. The five lines on a staff is more smother for reference to make it easier to read and write, or pretty much provide a foundation. Mostly though, you can have notes five lines below the staff. Now there are notes placed on the staff that guitars can't play that others can.I think the lowest guitars can play is 3 spaces below, or 2 lines below depending on how you look at it. Might be three lines. Not entirely sure.

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Hello, I thought I add my 2 cents here.

I'm an aspiring musician.

Lately I've been converting a lot of Symphony music into standard notation

and I discovered some interesting notional challenges. Long story short I'm putting guitar tabs into eBooks.

Even though the standard notation should be standard, it seems that the notation can be made to be difficult to follow, like the use of repeats. In other words, I think the performer has to either memorize or go through the notations in advance to figure out certain passages.

Granted guitar tabs alone does not provide rhythm information as clearly,

it's so much easier to use.

By the way I'm hoping to use the latest multi-effects/synthesizer like guitar pedals to play symphonys all by my self.

Also I used wiki to find out what clefts were, but the link here seems so much better.

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