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hb

Shaving a saddle

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hb    0
Thank you hb,

I also contacted Bob through email and he told me the same thing. He said I needed the tray for it to work properly and that he couldn't duplicate this type of saddle. I'm planning on calling KMC Music, which deals with importing Takamine into the United States, to find out if there is a replacement. Maybe a compatible bone bridge from one of their higher end guitars without the split saddle?? Wish me luck!

Please, if you don find something, I would love to know where you find it, as I would like to have a spare in case I ruin mine with adjustments.

thnx,

hb

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They told me that there was no replacement upgrade made for that saddle and that the more expensive models had different setups. However, they did take my address and said they would send me a replacement saddle for my Takamine with no charge. So I'm just going to try and adjust the plastic one for now. If you need to get a factory replacement, their number is (860) 509-8888 They were definitely inclined to help as much as possible.

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hb    0
They told me that there was no replacement upgrade made for that saddle and that the more expensive models had different setups. However, they did take my address and said they would send me a replacement saddle for my Takamine with no charge. So I'm just going to try and adjust the plastic one for now. If you need to get a factory replacement, their number is (860) 509-8888 They were definitely inclined to help as much as possible.

Thanks!...I'll give them a call.

hb

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OceanMan    0
Thanks!...I'll give them a call.

hb

Be VERY carefull.... tone and volume can be affected ...A pro will /can do it for $40 - $45 guaranteed . Toys and time and misery could cost you much more !

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bugly    0

Get a blank bone saddle trace out the current shape using your existing saddle as a replacement. Rough out the shape using a file, use progressivly finer files and sand with a fine grit to desired finish.

Once you have the saddle cut to the same size and shape as the original slowly sand down the surface until the desired height is reached. Remember the bottom of the saddle matches the bridge and the top of the saddle should have approximatly the same curviture as the neck on the guitar. Looking at your saddle pictures it is tad fiddly but certianly doable

It is possible to stuff up the saddle but blanks are cheap and you will get it done if you are patient and methodical. Its not rocket science really.

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knight46    2

Bob Colosi has some great saddles and if he doesn't have yours in stock he will custom make one with yours for a pattern for about $40.00. I got a bone saddle from him for my Yamaha and it is great.

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Hey, everybody. Brand new to the site, and I'll be damned if can actually be of some help. I have a Takamine EG-240RS with the same problem. Now, I'm no luthier. But, I've got great mechanical aptitude, and a basic understanding of the physics involved. So, I've been round and round with most of the local guitar stores over this thing, because I'm determined to put something in that slot that will last longer. It's a "good news-bad news" situation. The good news is that there is a workaround to this problem, but it's only temporary. The bad news is that Graph Tech doesn't make a micro-balanced saddle that is 3 inches long.. But, whatever.

First, the workaround: Someone in this topic previously discussed shaving the top of the saddle, and this is really the key. BUT FAIR WARNING: There are multiple angles that must stay consistent, and of course, they are not straight bevels. You must also keep the curve in the top of the saddle to maintain string geometry. If you do this yourself, be prepared to spend hours. I recommend taking pictures before you start, and working very slowly so you don't overdo it. HERE'S THE WORKAROUND. The saddle sits inside a metal tray, which contains the piezo pickup (hence the reason for not shaving the bottom). Underneath that is a thin metallic grounding strip which sits loosely in the slot and acts like shielding tape to reduce feedback. As long as you make sure that this strip stays directly underneath the pickup, you can place a shim underneath to compensate for the height taken off the saddle.

Should all else fail, I found and eBay link out of the UK of all places, where they sell hand made copies of these saddles. I've never done any business with them, so be aware that you do so at your own risk. But, here's the link: http://www.ebay.ie/itm/Takamine-G-Series-Saddle-Bone-Hand-Carved-Precison-Milled-Action-Adjusted-/180764306482?pt=UK_Musical_Instruments_Guitars_CV&hash=item2a16646c32#ht_1705wt_1272

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mset3    158

Hb,

The subject here has been pretty well covered. I would only say that if you choose to do yourself make sure the bottom of the saddle is perfectly flat and seated properly.

Mike

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