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nsfallen

what am i missing???

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nsfallen    0

hey guys, here's my problem.

when im soloing, whether it's for metal, blues, ect, it always ends up sounding the same or going back to the same thing. i've tried humming things, playing it slow, alternate picking, hammer ons, pull offs, listening to songs and trying to imitate, and everything else i can think of but i think it's because i'm always trying to stay within the scale (namely the pentatonic major and minor, and blues scale). i just feel trapped. staying within those scales, even if i change keys feels like i dont have a lot of options. whether i play it slow or fast or with a metal tone, or a clean blues tone, it all sounds the same to me and my roommates (who dont play guitar so they dont have much advice to offer).

any ideas? i'm starting to get fed up. i sit there and really want to play but then dont because i know that every time i do i play the same thing and its a shame especially because my schecter damien fr just got here yesturday and i have nothing to play on it

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nsfallen    0

But again, being able to play all those notes is useless if you don't have a main melody or theme - your audience has to feel that you're going somewhere with your solo, that there's a point. You have to communicate your idea and emotion through your playing. I don't know how else to describe it but that's how it should be. But as always, see what works for you.

that was posted by another member and that's pretty much nailing the problem. i just dont have the slightest idea how to fix it

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SlickCat    1

Thats why people call it "wanking" your playing scales up and down and the same riffs over and over.

A few things can help...

listen to some horn players....try and copy some of those licks.

Forget the scales and try to play more within the melody.

Force yourself to change....say "Im going to play this lead on only 3 strings" and try to do it. It will force you to find different patterns than the ones your used to.

Try different picking techniques "fingerpicking" "travis Picking"

"sweep Picking"

Try to keep from falling into your "comfort" zone...you know those licks already!!

Good luck...have fun :):leadguitar:

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nsfallen    0

i'll def check that out. i dunno just hit a wall and trying to get it resolved. i've done a lot of reading and things online and so far havnt found a solution

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Kirk Lorange    128

Hi, nsfallen, please do have a look at my other site PlaneTalk ... you sound like the player I wrote the book for: can't break out of the Pent Pattern and wondering what the trick is to it all.

Below is an example of playing a 12 bar thinking of chords rather than scales, seeing the whole neck as the chord and following the changes. It's kind of the opposite of scales and winds up sounding different because so many more notes come can come into play. PlaneTalk teaches you how to see the fretboard as a perpetual chord, easily (with a lot of time and practice).

YouTube - Red Strat Blues - 12 bar guitar improvisation

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WWlaidback    0

Improvisation is a gift that you can work for. I'm at the point in my playing where I think it's finally coming together for me, but I have a long way to go in my technical execution. I have the following recommendations:

1) Record yourself playing lead guitar. Play it back and see what you'd like to change. Your perception playing is not the same as listening, and this serves as a good check.

2) Have a pocket full of simple chops you know by heart and can throw in at anytime.

3) Know the importance of the one and the five. They get the job done, as Billy Gibbons says. Especially the one, according to BB King. Be ready to go up or down an octave on the one, and you can't go wrong if you go to the one on the chord change.

4) Play every note like it was meant to be played, even if it is wrong. Slide up one fret on any wrong note and it will be a right note.

5) know the importance of a pause. When you're running out of gas, take a pause and come back in.

6) A few well placed notes are often better than a hand full of busy notes that just fit the scale. I used to think it sounded cool to throw a lot of notes at the listeners, but some of them don't like that. Others do. As a listener I'm listening for quality and connectivity more than quantity. "Too many notes" becomes confusing to me as a listener.

7) Pick a couple of easier songs and learn the lead-guitar note-for-note. I haven't done enough of this myself. It's terribly repetitive, but most great lead guitarists have done this and will tell you so.

I could say more. I'm not at the point where I can improvise at will but I'm working on it. The thing that's probably most important is a fluency to your playing, where an idea is connected. You can know some good chops but they have to connect to each other.

I guess a book can be written on this subject. I've often wondered what the lead guitar player's thought process is.

I'm finding out it comes more from a familiarity with the instrument, the song material, and acting on certain feelings that come out, even if I'm not producing the notes I really intended - the feeling will take me to the right place on the fretboard. The resolution sounds like it is a planned and connected idea because of where it ends up rather than where it started. I'm still programming my fingers to act on what I feel. It's pretty satisfying when I can hit the note I was looking for, and build on that feeling. The audience likes to hear that too. It's coming from within, like a non-verbal language.

I hope I'm not being too esoteric, and I have a long long way to go in my performance.

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nsfallen    0

thanks wwlaidback. those are some good tips, i do try and listen to my playing on recording and it does help although its sometimes difficult to convey the message that I'm trying to. i havnt been improvising very long so it will come with practice but those are some good tips to start with. thanks again

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