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Help setting up pedal board

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I'm looking for some advise on setting up my board. I've just been adding things where I think they should go but would really like to make it work for the best tone. My chain right now goes...

MXR Dynacomp->Fender Tuner->Dan Electro Chorus->Bad Monkey OD->Akia Headrush delay->Art Tube Pre->Genz Benz Shen150lt Amp. I play more of an acoustic rock (like an DMB gone more rock and more alt). What do you think?

Thanks

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fly135    5

My suggestion....

Fender Tuner->MXR Dynacomp->Bad Monkey OD->Dan Electro Chorus->Akia Headrush delay->Art Tube Pre->Genz Benz Shen150lt Amp.

In general distortion before modulation and delay. Compressor in front. The tuners sometimes provide good buffering, so that goes after the guitar. However you might want to see if the tuner gives you any tone loss. If so then you could put your art tube amp in front and use a splitter cable to the tuner. You would lose mute during tuning.

Why do you have an Art preamp in front of the amp? Do you feel like it changes the tone?

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I'll try it. I got into using the pre before I had the board and used it instead of a Direct Box to help warm up the tone. I also use my amp as a personal monitor and run my vocals thru the 2nd channel. So if your getting ready to tell me that I don't need the pre on my guitar I might try it over on the vocals instead.

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Stratrat    0

Fly135 nailed it in his post above. Robert Keeley uses the acronym "Which Chain Of Effects Pedals Makes Life Easy?". It deciphers as follows:

W > Wah

C > Compressor

O > Overdrive (and/or distortion)

E > EQ

P > Pitch (whammy pedal, harmonizer, etc.)

M > Modulation (Chorus, Phaser, Flanger, etc.)

L > Level (Volume Pedal, clean boost, etc.)

E > Echo (or Delay)

That's a good starting point. Arranging pedals differently in the chain will make the sound differ, and you may find that you like it better (or not).

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Thanks for your help. It's nice to at least have a starting point. Now back to the tube pre, something else I was thinking about in the last 5mins what do you guys think about putting the pre at the begining then splitting it into the xlr of my 1st channel then running my pedal board into the 1/4 of the same channel to get a clean and fx blend giving me a little more of a stereo fill? The amp has 2 in per side plus an fx loop which I don't use because it addresses both channels (vocals with OD don't sound too hot or that they're are too hot is the problem) I know that was a long sentence but I was brain storming.

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eddiez152    129

I have a question,

With these kind of setups is there like more than one pedal used.

Or do you buy these in like one work station? I am knew to the whole electric thing. And if you folks had a choice of effect pedals, what would that be? I mean like the almost all out killer pedal setup.

Fly and Stratrat great info there.

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fly135    5

You could use the pre-amp to split the guitar and give you a clean and processed signal. Not sure plugging both into your amp at the same time. You could try it and see if it works.

Eddie, he's using multiple pedals in this instance. A multifx either hardwires the order of the pedals or allows some flexibility in moving them around. The Boss GT series allows you to place pedals pretty much anywhere in the chain.

WRT which pedals are best, that's a wide open question. But there is really a different recommendation for everyone you ask. I can't really comment on the killer pedals as I'm too cheap to buy them. But I've used the following pedals and liked them....

EHX Double Muff

EHX Big Muff

Visual Sounds Jekyll and Hyde

Digitech Digidelay

EHX English Muffin

Rat2

Bad Monkey

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I love my Headrush. I use it as much for playing live as I do for practicing lead. It has Tape Echo, Delay, and its a great looper. The delay and echo are nice that you can tap or dial them in with coarse adj and the fine adj. The loop station allows me to loop a riff and then sit and watch a football game or something and I'll play lead over one riff for 20mins loop another on the fly and do the same. Its been a great learning tool. Fly, I haven't tried it but the headrush also has 5 different outs but do you know what the advantages of that would be other than just sending to 5 different amps?

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eddiez152    129

Fly,

When I go to the guitar store, there seems to be hundreds of these things and everybody stepping on them somewhere. Seems kind of confusing. But thanks for the lineup, my interests of course starts with the folks here who use them and what works. I imagine they are like guitars each seems to have its own character.

I will have some reading to do.

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scotty_b    16
Fly135 nailed it in his post above. Robert Keeley uses the acronym "Which Chain Of Effects Pedals Makes Life Easy?". It deciphers as follows:

W > Wah

C > Compressor

O > Overdrive (and/or distortion)

E > EQ

P > Pitch (whammy pedal, harmonizer, etc.)

M > Modulation (Chorus, Phaser, Flanger, etc.)

L > Level (Volume Pedal, clean boost, etc.)

E > Echo (or Delay)

I have found that placing EQ before the overdrive is great, and if you have the flexibilty, place another one after it as well. Going before the OD allows you to really taylor the sound hitting the pedal.

The boost pedal can also go in different places in the chain, depending on what you want it for. I have a BBE Boosta Grande, and at the end of the chain it increases volume, at the start it adds more 'dirt' to the signal. Both can be good. Works best with a tube amp as well.

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scotty_b    16
I have a question,

With these kind of setups is there like more than one pedal used.

Or do you buy these in like one work station? I am knew to the whole electric thing. And if you folks had a choice of effect pedals, what would that be? I mean like the almost all out killer pedal setup.

Fly and Stratrat great info there.

Hey Eddie

There are a few ways you can go, depending on what you want. I have a Boss GT8, which I use for most things, but also have a Hot Cake Overdrive pedal that I use for heavily overdriven lead sounds, BBE Boosta Grande and Sonic Maximisers, and a Rocktron Talk Box as well.

Multi-fx units can be good, though sometimes a pedal or two might be a better option for a player wanting a classic rock sound.

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eddiez152    129

Do you folks use pedals when recording or only for live sound ? Fly has done a couple of recordings here and Scotty you as well, so are pedals being used ?

Then does the sound come a mic on the amp? Or do they also work when plugged in direct to the recording software?

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SlickCat    1

My live setup is a MI Audio Crunchbox; MXR EVH Flanger; MXR Cabon Copy Delay into my Tweed 5e3 Deluxe.

I also can record with this setup if I mic the amp and run the signal thru my Toneport.

I used to have a compressor, wah wah, reverb pedal and chorus pedal but trimmed everything down to my "essential pedals". One thing I might like is a volume pedal to adjust output and do "swell" effects without trying to reach down to the guitar controls while playing.

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scotty_b    16
Do you folks use pedals when recording or only for live sound ? Fly has done a couple of recordings here and Scotty you as well, so are pedals being used ?

Then does the sound come a mic on the amp? Or do they also work when plugged in direct to the recording software?

I normally use Guitar Rig by Native Instruments for recording at home - far more convenient. If I am recording something more 'serious' I will use my amp and probably some pedals.

In that case I would probably not record with reverb or non-tempo based delay effects, so that I could mix those down later to ensure they sit with the rest of the track.

I imagine they are like guitars each seems to have its own character.

Yes pedals do have their own character, which is why there are so many variations on overdrive or distortion. Each effect type has its hallmark pedal ( eg Tubescreamer) but there are countless pedals available for each sound you are after.

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Stratrat    0

Eddie - I've been using the built-in effects in GarageBand for recording, but you can also use a multi-fx or a pedalboard direct-in to your interface.

As far as the "ultimate" pedalboard, I don't know that anybody could ever truly arrive there without spending serious thousands of dollars - there are so, so many different pedals out there, and you never really know until you try them (and "tone" is such a subjective concept that "perfect" would vary for everyone). My idea of an "ultimate" pedalboard (for my amps/guitars and the music I play) would be something like this (the ones I already have are in blue):

* Peterson Strobostomp II tuner (you think spending $200 for a tuner is insane - until you try the Peterson!!!)

* Keeley 2-knob Compressor (currently using MXR DynaComp)

* Boss DS-1 (a much maligned pedal, but I actually like it!)

* Xotic BB Preamp OD

* Hermida Zendrive

* Digitech Hardwire CR-7 Chorus (currently using Danelectro Fab)

* Voodoo Labs Sparkledrive (for clean boost, or when I occasionally want the tubescreamer sound)

* MXR Carbon Copy delay (for slapback) (currently using Danelectro Fab)

* Boss DD-7 delay w/FS-5U for tap tempo (for longer delays/tap tempo)

* Digitech JamMan looper (for playing over loops)

Only problem is, those 4 "missing" pedals above add up to about $700! :isaynothing:

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fly135    5
Do you folks use pedals when recording or only for live sound ? Fly has done a couple of recordings here and Scotty you as well, so are pedals being used ?

Then does the sound come a mic on the amp? Or do they also work when plugged in direct to the recording software?

If you have a decent mic then mic'ng your amp is the way to go. Multifx can be recorded directly into the computer. Some have USB or SPDIF for a straight digital path. And most have cabinet modeling and a an EQ preset for direct in.

For the songs that I have done.... SoundClick artist: FLY135

Green River - I used the clean channel of my Hafler T3 preamp. It's all analog. It uses tubes for the dirt channels and FET for the clean channel. It's a 1U 19" rack unit with footswitch. If this thing would fit in a pedal it would be the cat's meow.

Loop Noodle Soup - EHX Big Muff (the black Russian ver) with the Jamman looper.

Fun Delay - Korg AX3G multifx. Cheap little $50 box but has some pretty good distortion tones.

Up Around the Bend - Proco Rat2

Casi Azul - GNX3 Multifx. The bass in this tune is an Epi Dot Guitar using the GNX octave divider.

Streetwise - EHX Big Muff for one guitar track. Can't remember exactly what I used for the lead. It might have been a Nady TD-1 tube distortion pedal. The bass was played through a Korg AX3B multifx pedal.

Everything was recorded with a $10 Nady mic played through a Epi Vjr and 1x12 cab, except Fun Delay was recorded direct. One of these days I plan to buy a better mic. I really think you can get great tones out of most multifx if you tweak them. Multifx seem to do really well recording also. I find great deals on Craigslist all the time.

I also just picked up the $100 Peavey Vypyr 15W 1x8 modeling amp because I wanted small and light to carry around with no extra stuff. I am really impressed with it. It has a cheap but adequate speaker, but I had a slightly better speaker from a EPi Vjr combo that I put in it and it sounds even better. The cab is big enough for a 10", so I plan to cut the hole bigger and put one in soon. I really like the cleans. They are strong and punchy. And you dial in a bit of overdrive. The dirt sounds are a mixed bag. I need to tweak on them a bit more.

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eddiez152    129

Ah! The Peterson Strobe tuner, Spot on dead on accuracy. Stratrat

Mac, yes I have one. I really appreciate the thread, and all the wonderful info found on the subject and how all of you use the equipment. So last night I go in search for some pedals and come home with Rode NT1 and a Roland Handsonic 10. Now I revisit this thread loaded with more info from all of you and read more on my quest to hardware for the electrics.

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Stratrat    0
hey stratrat, what is the advantage of the tuner you mention?

The #1 advantage is accuracy. Many of the pedal tuners are accurate to within 1 or 2 cents - the strobe tuner is accurate to within .01 cent. I previously used a Boss TU-2 on my pedalboard, and often had to "touch up" the tuning a bit even after using the tuner.....the strobe tuner gets you right on the money every time. It also offers what they call "sweetened" tunings, where your strings are tuned a wee bit offset from straight chromatic tuning. This is intended to make chords sound, well, sweeter. The strobe tuner is very useful for intonating your guitars....the accuracy makes it a snap.

In addition to the "sweetened" presets, it has presets for drop tuning, DADGAD, capo tuning, 12-string, bass guitar, pedal steel, dobro and violin. It also works as an active DI box if you're playing direct-in. The pedal can be set up for true bypass or buffered operation according to your needs (using DIP switches), and you can power other 9V pedals off it by using a 'daisy chain' adapter.

I resisted buying one for a long time, thinking that the increased accuracy couldn't make *that* much difference, and that I was getting my intonation set just fine using what I had. I finally caved in and bought it, and definitely haven't regretted it. Using the strobe display takes a bit of getting used to, but once you have the hang of it, tuning is quicker than using the incremental lights found on most other tuners.

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Noodler    1

Eddiez,

I have a question,

With these kind of setups is there like more than one pedal used.

Have a squiz at these pedal boards! Love the funky neon one :yes: I tend to use my pedals one at a time because I can't leave them set up with the kids playing.

Budget tends to dictate what you can get. Some pedals like the Zendrive and Sparkle Drive everyone would love to own. Same with Keely-modified pedals. If I was a gazillionaire, I'd definitely get those two, a Brent Mason Hot-wired, a Vox Satchurator, a T-Rex compressor and overdrive, etc. It is a huge market and some crzy folks own 20 different type of fuzz pedals alone! It can quickly become an obsession. I think MI Audio (slickcat's Crunch Box) has the best coolness/ $ ratio. They sound incredible :yeahhh: in real life.

Stratrat, I'll take that Dynacomp off you if you don't like it! :P Better than my Marshall one.

Thanks for the info on how to hear you using some pedals fly. I am about to buy a EHX Big Muff myself. Hard to choose.

As an extra note, I don't think anyone has mentioned that lots of folks run time based effects through the fx loop of an amp if it has one.

7608.attach

7609.attach

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I appreciate all the info but...Way down in this thread (before it was hijacked by Eddie ;) Just Kidding ) I was talking about running a split out of my tube pre (1/4 and xlr out) into my multichannel amp (1/4 and xlr in's per side). I tried it over the weekend and something to do with the Hi Z of the xlr out into an amp with a built in pre pegs the gain out. If I run split into the mixer I'm fine but I'd really like to find a way to get this sound into my amp. Any Suggestion? Also any suggestion on compressor settings, I understand it's going to be noisey but what is the best way to reduce the hiss. Thanks

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Noodler    1

Robot,

Without being familiar with either your amp or your outboard preamp, it seems pretty obvious that this is what's happening:

guitar -> Preamp -> Preamp -> power amp.

In other words feeding your outboard preamp to your acoustic amplifier preamp is giving it waaaay more signal than it is going to like. Is there a way to plug your offboard pre-amp directly to the power stage of your amp? For example, "Effects Return" expects a "pre-amped" signal. The only other thing you can do is somehow reduce the signal from the offboard preamp back to guitar level, which kind of defeats the who idea.

Is the sound of your offboard preamp a lot better than your amp's one?

Here's some good info on compressors:

Analog Man Compressor Pedal Page

Basically, the more compression, the more hiss. That's because you are increasing the overall gain. So only using what you need will help ie just like if you turn up a distortion pedal high, it will get noisier. So a compressor increases overall gain, then cuts off the peaks. Does that make sense? So a separate power supply, good leads, good compressor, all help. But turn it up and you will get noise. The other problem with compressors (which I have) is that when they start compressing (when the signal dies off), you can hear it kick in. The T-Rex (Comp Nova?) and better ones don't have that so much.

Good luck.

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I kinda get it...but, it seems strange that if I run the 1/4 out of the pre to the amp's 1/4 I'm fine. It's when I run the XLR to XLR is where the gain explodes on the pre. The manual on the amp says that the xlr input is @ microphone level while the 1/4 is line level. What's the difference? I can't find much on why when I hook up the xlr out (pre) to the xlr in (amp) the needle goes all the way to the right even if the input is all the way down with no signal going in. The compressor is going to be a bit of a different issue. I'm using all this on an acoustic that only adds to my problems but I know it can be done. I don't play big open chords so I'm not real concerned about the comp killing big beautiful tone. I play very choppy, percussive type music and some lead so I'm trying to tighten up while gaining sustain and help get harmonics out. I've been messing with it more and more and even though I've got a piezo and mag sound hole pick up I think I might try modifying a sound hole cover to help with the extra feed back. I got this in my head from watching a Monte Montgomery video except I can play anything like that and he doesn't use the sound hole pup. I do appreciate you info and If you've got anymore ideas about the pre let me know. You guys are great. thanks

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