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carol m

Which Mic for a Nylon String Guitar?

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thodwris    1

That sounded pretty good Carol!Nice playing by the way :winkthumb: .I am glad that you have sorted out your problem after all this time.The best of luck in your search for a mic...

All the best,

Theo

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eddiez152    129

Carol,

Are you recording into the mic with your speakers on? I am hearing a warble of in the recording, it certainly the rest is loud and clear as far as the recording goes.

I trust your wearing head phones while recording a track. As far as the input settings go, red line then back off, and if you see it light anytime in the test bring back level a little more until you can see what is working for you when your ready for the take.

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scotty_b    16

Carol

maybe have a look at the Rode M2. I think you might find one on Ebay for just a little more than your budget. They are a small diaphragm condensor, and will provide a decent sound for guitar or vocals.

They are an Australian company, based in Silverwater, so yuo can pick up a good street price on them around Sydney as well.

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carol m    64

Scotty: I did a google for Rode M2 and they are $279 rrp and you can get them for $179 the cheapest I saw. Thanks for the tip, all ideas logged for future use!

I'm a bit confused about a couple of things

Is a condenser mic considered better for vocals and instrument (I gather that picking up a wider range of frequencies is their main selling point)

About diaphragms - someone (I think Doug) thought that a bigger diaphragm is better for vocals, and a narrower one is better for instruments. I see you recommend a small diaphragm for vocal and instrument when Tekker (I think) recommended a wide one (I think for vocals).

Also, one of the mics I looked at was pushing the fact that it had 2 diaphragms. Would that be the same as having a wide one?

Don't worry if you don't know, this thread has become a bit technical

and I doubt that such fine tuning will make much difference at my level of recording! Although, at this rate I'll be moonlighting as a sound engineer by next year :winkthumb:

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carol m    64

Eddie: not sure about a warble (and I wasn't even singing) - I do wear earphones when recording, and everything else eg youtube or on this site, on the computer (plugged into my Tascam interface).

I didn't hear a warble but I'll listen again - I know you have studio grade earphones so that would explain that - I have middle of the road enclosed earphones.

If I unplug the Tascam, the 'wireless out' goes from the computer through to my speakers (not powered) but connected to the CD player which has power (obviously). I keep the Tascam plugged in all the time and usually only use the speakers for CDs, radio and the tape recorder (remember them?).

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Stratrat    0

Carol,

As I understand it, conventional wisdom is to use small diaphragm condensers for guitars (and some other instruments), large diaphragm for vocals. IIRC, it's because the small diaphragm doesn't get as "boomy" as a large diaphragm.

Dynamic mics are good when you want a "rougher" sound, or when you're going to be dealing with high sound pressure levels (volumes)....rock vocals and/or "screamer" vocalists, and mic'ing loud instruments such as drums and electric guitar amps. You'll also generally have less feedback issues with them, and they work good if you're trying to capture vocals in a noisy environment. Condensers are so sensitive that they pick up every little sound - the clock on the wall across the room, the phone ringing downstairs, someone closing the front door of the house as they come in, etc.

The mic you're looking at with a double diaphragm may be a "figure 8" configuration - it records both in front of and behind the mic, instead of just from the front like most condensers. It's useful if you want to capture direct sound as well as "room" sound (e.g., the ambient sound of your guitar in the room).

...and don't feel bad, I'm learning all this stuff right alongside you!!! I've bought a couple of books and am reading all the advice here as well as anything and everything else I can find, trying to put it all to work as I experiment with my recording setup. I keep discovering that the more I learn, the less I really know! :dunno:

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carol m    64

Thanks Mac (can I quote you on my cv when I go for that Studio Engineer job!)

Quote: "I keep discovering that the more I learn, the less I really know!"

Ain't that the truth! I realised in my twenties (I think :wheelchai ) that 'you never know what you don't know you don't know'.

And around that time I also discovered that even what you think is the most boring subject, becomes interesting once you start to learn about it. (ref: carol m Philosophy 101). :winkthumb: (no charge).

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Tekker    1

Large diaphragm mics are commonly used on acoustic instruments too, not just vocals. The Studio Projects B1 gets great reviews as an instrument mic.

I don't have the B1 (I want one though) but from what I've heard it is a work horse that sounds great on various sources from vocals, acoustic guitar, electric guitar amps, and even drums.

Check out the reviews at harmony central...

Studio Projects B1: Harmony Central User Reviews

-tkr

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scotty_b    16
Scotty: I did a google for Rode M2 and they are $279 rrp and you can get them for $179 the cheapest I saw. Thanks for the tip, all ideas logged for future use!

I'm a bit confused about a couple of things

Is a condenser mic considered better for vocals and instrument (I gather that picking up a wider range of frequencies is their main selling point)

About diaphragms - someone (I think Doug) thought that a bigger diaphragm is better for vocals, and a narrower one is better for instruments. I see you recommend a small diaphragm for vocal and instrument when Tekker (I think) recommended a wide one (I think for vocals).

Also, one of the mics I looked at was pushing the fact that it had 2 diaphragms. Would that be the same as having a wide one?

Don't worry if you don't know, this thread has become a bit technical

and I doubt that such fine tuning will make much difference at my level of recording! Although, at this rate I'll be moonlighting as a sound engineer by next year :winkthumb:

Hi Carol

In a perfect world I would use a large diaphragm mic on vocals too, though as you have specified your budget I suggested that mic. Maybe it is the Rode M3 I was thinking of then?

In my own studio I have a Rode K2 large diaphragm condensor that I primarily use for vocals, though I also have a ribbon mic that also sounds great on some vocals. Both have provided excellent results on instruments as well. Similarly I have a matched small diaphragm condensor pair that are good on vocals.

The mic is one component of the signal chain, and whilst important we must also consider the acoustic properties of the room, our gain structure through the desk we are recording into, the preamp ,quality of leads, and of course the sound source itself.

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Doug    12

That tends to be the recommendation - small diameter for instruments and large for vocals. But I don't think it's a hard and fast rule.

There are different types of patterns for the angle at which the diaphragm can pick up the sound (just to make things more confusing). There are omnis that are more or less directionless, there are cardiods that concentrate on a narrow angle in front of the mic, hyper-cardiods that have an even narrower angle, and figure eight which is like two cardiods back to back. You could use a figure eight between two musicians to capture both with one mic. And some mic's (my AT4050 for example) can switch between patterns.

Which mic had two diaphragms? Perhaps it was a stereo mic? Or maybe a figure eight.

By the way, I thought the sound from your existing mic was pretty good.

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carol m    64

Doug: I think it was a figure 8 - I'll check tomorrow to see which one it was.

I thought the mic I had did 'OK' as well, considering I didn't do any experimenting with placement, in-put volumes etc - I was so pleased that there was no interference and I could have it 6" away from the strings.

Also, it was my original bottom of the range Student Yamaha classical (right handed) with the bridge and strings reversed and no EQ or effects added to the recording.

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