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herrKanin

Funky blues improv - Where do I start?

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Noodler    1

Crickey Captain Kirk, I'm floored! :scared:

Although that post was in the musical stratosphere, I actually do get a lot of what you've said from watching your "Noodling in A7/ A9" video. ie I've seen how much you can do all over the board with just one chord. That video is saved to my desktop. Really, really nice strat tone there BTW.

I completely struggle when the chords change, even if it is just like C, Em, Dm, G. It's hard to not just to play notes out of the chords and to not revert to the C major scale. Or even a country in A, to not just play pentatonics/major scale/only chord tones. The chords change pretty quickly and it's hard to switch mindsets with each change....and know where you want to be for the next change.

I've made progress with some chords (C,G,A) and can pick their numbers all over, but Em, Dm, would be a struggle. Closest I can get is throwing in sus4's adding b7's etc, but I wouldn't call them proper lines yet. More like "playing leads by embellishing the chords but playing them as single notes and double stops."

How long should it take to get used to switching in your brain with each chord? If you say years it's OK, guitar is a life-long thing for me. Hehe. :)

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scotty_b    16

You do find after a while though that you can superimpose two sets of arrays over each other, like when playing over a 11th chord. When I'm playing over an 11th chord, say D11, I see it as the 1-3-5 of D + the 1-3-5 of C (C/D, in other words), so I'm seeing two sets of major chord tones jogged out by two frets.

Now I'm giving it all away!

Larry Carlton has mentioned this approach to his improvising, which he calls the 'super arpeggio', which allows his to hit the extensions of a chord, and he also uses it in such a way to start to employ non-diatonic tones over chords as well.

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Noodler    1

It makes sense since chords are stacked major and minor 3rds, and extensions continue that pattern. Wouldn't have a clue how to make use of that information though....

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scotty_b    16

if you haven't already done so, buy Plane Talk, work through that, and then buy the Frank Gambale books on improvisation, and you will learn the theory behind the concepts of modal playing and chord extensions.

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Noodler    1

Yeah I've got PT, which I really should reread and spend time practicing. I already understand chord extensions, but have trouble applying PT through changing chords.

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Kirk Lorange    128

I just saw your post up above, noodler.

Don't worry about falling into scale patterns! They're all the same notes, so it's all good. It's just that if you are aware of the underlying chord and its chord tones, which takes time to ingrain, you will always be seeing the 'home notes' -- where your phrase depart from and where you return to ... to put it awkwardly.

All you need to do is to train yourself to see that whole fretboard as one long chord ... I would just keep on playing away if I were you, noodler, use everything you know to move ahead, but if you always remember that the best (by far) 'standard' or 'constant' to refer everything to is the 'chord of the moment'. It's always there, no matter what, so it's the most reliable of all.

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