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135me

need help bluegrass

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135me    0

I have ben playing for about 1 year

I just was a little bar and some old time's were playing bluegrass

I was ask to sit in and i did but i was like a fish out of water so fast

I'am looking for help in speed and lead picking .Hey i had a good time and was ask to come back and play. I play a Martin D-1 Acoustic

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allthumbs    8

Playing for just a year and sitting in with other players is pretty good. Practice that style of music. Easier to play fast and melodicly if you know what is likely to be happening in the next bar of the tune.

Learn some signiture bluegrass licks to throw in where needed.

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135me    0

Thank you allthumbs i'am working on the speed and some licks.

I get some help from one of the guy's i was jaming with Hey he's in his 70's and work me or in on time lol

Thank you allthumbs

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rwjones3    0

For bluegrass guitar, you really just need to get real good at the "boom click" pattern with good time keeping, and able to quickly switch between chords G, C, and D. (Don't forget to bring a cappo) I wouldn't worry about playing melody on the guitar. Learning to sing some tunes while playing would be better.

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Kirk Lorange    128

Hi 135me.

Bluegrass music usually follows a very set formula chord wise. From what I know about it, it's almost exclusively built around the I-IV-V chords of the key and more often than not it's very "in key" so you could first attack it by practicing the major scale for all keys, ie, if the tune is in the key of C, use the C major scale.

Once you learn a bit more about how music is structured you'll be able to keep track of each chord as it comes and goes in the progression and create lines that 'fit the chords' rather than just relying on a scale to do the job for you. If you ask those old timers about how they think of it all, I can guarantee that they'll tell you that the chords are the most important thing to keep in mind.

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Noodler    1

A pretty lady on youtube posts videos on bluegrass playing. I asked her to do one for me on bluegrass rhythm and she did! How nice is that!!! :)

This is the one I first found of her:

This is one she did for me. It's got some really nifty tricks.

I've got a crush. :wub:

This guy is also awesome:

Watch these videos a zillion times. They are condensed. eg when he says to go into a room and practice, to stomp your foot, etc. You've got to actually do it. It's taking me months, but I'm slowly getting there. I suggest downloading them. They are as good as any DVD or lesson with a teacher, so don't be put off by their brevity, it's a lot packed into a short lesson. They say a week's worth in one sentence, eg "play with all the possibilities in the key you're in", or "go into a room and practice keeping time until you can talk, shout at the Mrs, and never lose your rhythm." Each of those is a month's worth of practice.

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johnnydoxx    28

My limited experience in BG was that most songs were in the key of G, I presume the fiddles had something to do with that. So, as advised, it's good to have a capo on the second fret do the D's are easy to grab. Hardly ever did I find more than three chords, often just two. Although the anthem of the banjo player, Foggy Mountain Breakdown, seemed to have more, now that I recall.

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Lcjones    8

The next best thing to actually playing with other bluegrass players is playing along with a bluegrass album. Never underestimate the power of a CD or a vinyl record.

Kirk is righteous with the I-IV-V circle of chords. Add a minor and you have a classic bluegrass sound.

I don't know about your neck of the woods but where I am at, I'm in the heart of bluegrass country. Classic bluegrass is timeless and has no borders. It's simple. It's aggressive. It's bereft of baggage. It's clean.

Of course, the banjo and/or fiddle is what carries bluegrass music. Not the guitar. Appalachian music, i.e., bluegrass music, was born from the Celtic nation music and adapted by the migrants to the mountainous regions of Eastern United States. Bluegrass music, as we know it today did not exist until the late 1930's and '40's. Up to that point it was "mountain music". Mountain music usually included a fiddle and banjo and rarely a guitar. The guitar is a late comer to today's bluegrass music. Of course, today's bluegrass style would not exist except for Bill Monroe and Earl Scruggs.

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Noodler    1

I followed that lady's (Bonny :wow:) advice and bought a metronome. She's got such an authentic, easy kind of feel. I'm finding the best advice so far is that if you screw up, it's OK, as long as you don't lose the beat. Keep that rhythm going and people will forgive a lot!

I've got a dreadnought guitar and wow is it big! Is bluegrass really loud when played live? My guitar is loud, and they emphasise not covering the sound-hole to lose volume.

LC Jones, that was a great, interesting and informative summary. When you say Celtic, you mean like Scottish/ Irish? Have you ever been in one of those "parking lot jams"? We've got a local mob who puts on a weekend each year. I'll have to give it a go this year. It caters to all levels (slow jams, etc). I bought a 3 CD set, kind of a "Best of Bluegrass" to get an overview. Cripple Creek seems to be the tune.

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Kirk Lorange    128

What I love about authentic Bluegrass bands is the way they have one microphone center stage. When any one instrument takes a solo, the player strolls up to it and it's just on loud enough to bring him or her up in volume a tad above the rest. Very minimalist, very classy.

And, yes, the vi chord is often thrown in as 'the minor', isn't it, as in 'Foggy Mountain Breakdown'.

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eddiez152    129

Kirk,

Thats kicking it. :claping::yes: Still trying to take the smile off my face.

You know, when I watched the youtube link, my first thoughts were your one finger chord tone lesson.

Guitar sounds great, see you were doing that in a dropped D

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Kirk Lorange    128

Yes, it was a great band, johnny. Drums, bass, percussion, two guitars, banjo. He played his electric banjo most of the time. Five singers ... we opened for 'The Highwaymen' all around Australia back in 92.

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135me    0

I would like to say thank to all that posted .

Yes i have a story or two. I asked one old timer about one of the run he was using it was a G run and he show me I ask him if he would write down and he LOOKED at like me like I just lost mine mind

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Noodler    1

I know that look!!

:dunno: I don't know what it means though! Maybe he thought it was too easy? That's what I always think, anyway. Or possibly he learned everything by watching/ by ear? I know a guy who is "untutored" who says he doesn't know what he's playing, but can play like Brad Paisley. I've just got to watch him play whenever I go into his shop and remember what I can. He's happy to play for me and the ideas I get are as good as a paid lesson, I just wish I could remember more.

I'd suggest knowing you G major scale inside and out (up near the nut) for instance, and then if he's using a note not in the scale it's easy to remember. That's if you're playing in G. Then just work it out from memory and by ear by trial and error.

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